7

I have a task that I need to run asynchronously from the web page that triggered it. This task runs rather long, and as the web page could be getting a lot of these requests, I'd like celery to only run one instance of this task at a given time.

Is there any way I can do this in Celery natively? I'm tempted to create a database table that holds this state for all the tasks to communicate with, but it feels hacky.

2

You probably can create a dedicated worker for that task configured with CELERYD_CONCURRENCY=1 then all tasks on that worker will run synchronously

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1

You can use memcache/redis for that. There is an example on the celery official site - http://docs.celeryproject.org/en/latest/tutorials/task-cookbook.html

And if you prefer redis (This is a Django realization, but you can also easily modify it for your needs):

from django.core.cache import cache
from celery.utils.log import get_task_logger


logger = get_task_logger(__name__)


class SingletonTask(Task):
    def __call__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        lock = cache.lock(self.name)

        if not lock.acquire(blocking=False):
            logger.info("{} failed to lock".format(self.name))
            return

        try:
            super(SingletonTask, self).__call__(*args, **kwargs)
        except Exception as e:
            lock.release()
            raise e
        lock.release()

And then use it as a base task:

@shared_task(base=SingletonTask)
def test_task():
    from time import sleep
    sleep(10)

This realization is nonblocking. If you want next task to wait for the previous task change blocking=False to blocking=True and add timeout

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  • Where does cache.lock come from? Is that specific to a backend? I can't find it in the Django docs. – DylanYoung Jul 21 '17 at 14:30
  • 1
    Yep, it is specific to redis backend. lock is a wrapper over SETNX command that is usually used for this case. I'm using django-redis as a Redis backend for Django. – shaihulud Jul 21 '17 at 14:55
  • Cool! For those not using Redis, cache.add should work similarly (though atomicity may not be guaranteed depending on the backend). – DylanYoung Aug 8 '17 at 16:50

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