367

What am I doing wrong here?

I have a .social div, but on the first one I want zero padding on the top, and on the second one I want no bottom border.

I have attempted to create classes for this first and last but I think I've got it wrong somewhere:

.social {
    width: 330px;
    height: 75px;
    float: right;
    text-align: left;
    padding: 10px 0;
    border-bottom: dotted 1px #6d6d6d;
}

.social .first{padding-top:0;}

.social .last{border:0;}

And the HTML

<div class="social" class="first">
    <div class="socialIcon"><img src="images/facebook.png" alt="Facebook" /></div>
    <div class="socialText">Find me on Facebook</div>
</div>

I'm guessing it's not possible to have two different classes? If so how can I do this?

4
  • 3
    I created a simple example to demonstrate the difference between the descendent selector and the double-class selector: jsfiddle.net/jyAyX. Also, see developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/CSS/Getting_Started/Selectors.
    – AlexMA
    Commented Aug 11, 2012 at 23:58
  • Just curious if I do: <p class = "a" class = "b"></p> will both rules be applied or just b or ... I am doing a quick and dirty alpha and was about to cut and paste class statements into lots of elements that did not have classes but a few do. Just trying to work out how this would be handled. Have looked bit with no joy.
    – BeNice
    Commented Sep 12, 2016 at 13:26
  • Also related (if not even considered as duplicate of): CSS Selector that applies to elements with two classes
    – Adrian W
    Commented Jul 15, 2018 at 18:01
  • 1
    @BeNice Only the first class attribute applies; the second one will be ignored. In your example, class = "a" will apply, class = "b" will be ignored. Commented Jan 27, 2021 at 5:35

9 Answers 9

673

If you want two classes on one element, do it this way:

<div class="social first"></div>

Reference it in css like so:

.social.first {}

Example:

https://jsfiddle.net/tybro0103/covbtpaq/

6
  • 8
    Thanks, wasn't aware I could double up like that :) Good to know for the future!
    – Francesca
    Commented Aug 11, 2012 at 23:32
  • What would happen if we had just <div class="first"></div> ? Commented Jan 21, 2016 at 11:39
  • 1
    @MarcoCastanho I updated answer with link to example
    – tybro0103
    Commented Jan 21, 2016 at 15:53
  • 3
    I just wanted to add the order which you reference the CSS element will not matter so you can also reference it in css like so: .first.social {} and it will be the same as .social.first {} Commented Apr 3, 2016 at 21:18
  • 3
    it is important to note that there is no space in between 2 classes. Spent 5 minutes figuring out what I was doing wrong.
    – Pramod
    Commented May 11, 2020 at 9:52
42

You can try this:

HTML

<div class="social">
    <div class="socialIcon"><img src="images/facebook.png" alt="Facebook" /></div>
    <div class="socialText">Find me on Facebook</div>
</div>

CSS CODE

.social {
  width:330px;
  height:75px;
  float:right;
  text-align:left;
  padding:10px 0;
  border-bottom:dotted 1px #6d6d6d;
}
.social .socialIcon{
  padding-top:0;
}
.social .socialText{
  border:0;
}

To add multiple class in the same element you can use the following format:

<div class="class1 class2 class3"></div>

DEMO

32

Remember that you can apply multiple classes to an element by separating each class with a space within its class attribute. For example:

<img class="class1 class2">
19

If you have 2 classes i.e. .indent and .font, class="indent font" works.

You dont have to have a .indent.font{} in css.

You can have the classes separate in css and still call both just using the class="class1 class2" in the html. You just need a space between one or more class names.

1
  • For some reason it didn't work for me, although I also believe that it should work the way you've mentioned. Suspecting if my CSS classes being defined in two different stylesheets could be a factor. Need to investigate this.
    – RBT
    Commented Jun 14, 2021 at 4:18
10

If you only have two items, you can do this:

.social {
    width: 330px;
    height: 75px;
    float: right;
    text-align: left;
    padding: 10px 0;
    border: none;
}

.social:first-child { 
    padding-top:0;
    border-bottom: dotted 1px #6d6d6d;
}
0
7

I know this post is getting outdated, but here's what they asked. In your style sheet:

.social {
    width: 330px;
    height: 75px;
    float: right;
    text-align: left;
    padding: 10px 0;
    border-bottom: dotted 1px #6d6d6d;
}
[class~="first"] {
    padding-top:0;
}
[class~="last"] {
    border:0;
}

But it may be a bad way to use selectors. Also, if you need multiple "first" extension, you'll have to be sure to set different name, or to refine your selector.

[class="social first"] {...}

I hope this will help someone, it can be pretty handy in some situation.

For exemple, if you have a tiny piece of css that has to be linked to many different components, and you don't want to write a hundred time the same code.

div.myClass1 {font-weight:bold;}
div.myClass2 {font-style:italic;}
...
div.myClassN {text-shadow:silver 1px 1px 1px;}

div.myClass1.red {color:red;}
div.myClass2.red {color:red;}
...
div.myClassN.red {color:red;}

Becomes:

div.myClass1 {font-weight:bold;}
div.myClass2 {font-style:italic;}
...
div.myClassN {text-shadow:silver 1px 1px 1px;}

[class~=red] {color:red;}
6

If you want to apply styles only to an element which is its parents' first child, is it better to use :first-child pseudo-class

.social:first-child{
    border-bottom: dotted 1px #6d6d6d;
    padding-top: 0;
}
.social{
    border: 0;
    width: 330px;
    height: 75px;
    float: right;
    text-align: left;
    padding: 10px 0;
}

Then, the rule .social has both common styles and the last element's styles.

And .social:first-child overrides them with first element's styles.

You could also use :last-child selector, but :first-childis more supported by old browsers: see https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/CSS/:first-child#Browser_compatibility and https://developer.mozilla.org/es/docs/CSS/:last-child#Browser_compatibility.

1
5

Another option is to use Descendant selectors

HTML:

<div class="social">
<p class="first">burrito</p>
<p class="last">chimichanga</p>
</div>

Reference first one in CSS: .social .first { color: blue; }

Reference last one in CSS: .social .last { color: green; }

Jsfiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/covbtpaq/153/

1

Instead of using multiple CSS classes, to address your underlying problem you can use the :focus pseudo-selector:

input[type="text"] {
   border: 1px solid grey;
   width: 40%;
   height: 30px;
   border-radius: 0;
}
input[type="text"]:focus {
   border: 1px solid #5acdff;
}

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