23

Suppose I have a class A:

public class A {
    public A(){....}
    public void method1() {...}
};

And an instance of that class:

A anA = new A();

Is there any way to override the method1() only for anA? This question arises when I write a small painting program in which I have to extend the JPanel class several times just to make minor changes to the different panels that have slightly different characteristics.

46

You can do the following:

A anA = new A() {
    public void method1() {
        ...
    }
};

This is the same as:

private static class myA extends A {
    public void method1() {
        ...
    }
}

A anA = new myA();

Only with the exception that in this case myA can be reused. That's not possible with anonymous classes.

  • 14
    True, however technically this is creating an anonymous class that extends the class A. – Stephen C Aug 13 '12 at 6:37
  • @StephenC Indeed. I have updated the answer. Thanks for pointing out. – jensgram Aug 13 '12 at 6:38
  • @jensgram This might be late but thank you very much. – カオナシ Mar 16 '13 at 23:25
13

You can create a an new anonymous class on the fly, as long as you are using the no-arg constructor of your class A:

A anA = new A() {

  @Override
  public void method1() {
    ...
  }
};

Note that what you want to do is very close to what is known as a lambda, which should come along the next release 8 of Java SE.

3

I like to do this kind of thing with a delegate, or "strategy pattern".

public interface ADelegate {
   public void method1();
}

public class A {
    public A(){....}
    public ADelegate delegate;
    public final void method1() { delegate.method1(); }
};

A anA = new A();
anA.delegate = new ADelegate() {
   public void method1() { ... }
};

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