20

Having a class like this:

class A {
public:
    bool hasGrandChild() const;

private:
    bool hasChild() const;
    vector<A> children_;
};

Why is it not possible to use a private method hasChild() in a lambda expression defined in the method hasGrandChild() like this?

bool A::hasGrandChild() const {
    return any_of(children_.begin(), children_.end(), [](A const &a) {
        return a.hasChild();
    });
}

Compiler issues an error that the method hasChild() is private within the context. Is there any workaround?

Edit: It seems that the code as I posted it originally works. I thought that it is equivalent, but the code that does not work on GCC is more like this:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

class Foo;

class BaseA {
protected:
    bool hasChild() const { return !children_.empty(); }
    std::vector<Foo> children_;
};

class BaseB {
protected:
    bool hasChild() const { return false; }
};

class Foo : public BaseA, public BaseB {
public:
  bool hasGrandChild() const {
    return std::any_of(children_.begin(), children_.end(), [](Foo const &foo) {
        return foo.BaseA::hasChild();
      });
  }  
};

int main()
{
  Foo foo;
  foo.hasGrandChild();
  return 0;
}

Seems that there is a problem with fully qualified names as this does not work, but this works.

  • 1
    The closure type has no relation to your class A, so naturally it can't access A's non-public members. Nor can it ever, since its type name is unknowable, so you can't even make it a friend. – Kerrek SB Aug 13 '12 at 12:09
  • 2
    Is it just me or does this work on gcc? ideone.com/333qw – pmr Aug 13 '12 at 12:15
  • @pmr: Yes it seems to work in older GCC, but does not work in newer one. – Juraj Blaho Aug 13 '12 at 12:28
  • @JurajBlaho It works on 4.7.1. By newer you mean 4.8? – pmr Aug 13 '12 at 12:29
  • It just does not work for me in 4.6.2. Maybe it was a bug there. I should update. – Juraj Blaho Aug 13 '12 at 12:30
29

It seems to be just a GCC bug in a special case when the lambda tries to access a protected member from parent class using fully qualified name. This does not work:

class Base {
protected:
    bool hasChild() const { return !childs_.empty(); }
    std::vector<Foo> childs_;
};

class Foo : public Base {
public:
  bool hasGrandChild() const {
    return std::any_of(childs_.begin(), childs_.end(), [](Foo const &foo) {
      return foo.Base::hasChild();
    });
  }  
};

, but this works:

class Foo : public Base {
public:
  bool hasGrandChild() const {
    return std::any_of(childs_.begin(), childs_.end(), [](Foo const &foo) {
      return foo.hasChild();
    });
  }  
};

According to C++11, 5.1.2/3:

The type of the lambda-expression (which is also the type of the closure object) is a unique, unnamed non-union class type — called the closure type — whose properties are described below. This class type is not an aggregate (8.5.1). The closure type is declared in the smallest block scope, class scope, or namespace scope that contains the corresponding lambda-expression.

And then C++11, 11.7/1:

A nested class is a member and as such has the same access rights as any other member.

So the mentioned function-local lambda should have the same access rights as any other member of the class. Therefore it should be able to call a protected method from a parent class.

  • 1
    Great explanation of why it should work. (And why most of the other answers here are wrong.) +1 – etherice Aug 20 '13 at 13:06
9

The standard (C++11, §5.1.2/3) states that

The type of the lambda-expression (which is also the type of the closure object) is a unique, unnamed non-union class type — called the closure type.

Since it's a unique class type that is not a friend of A, it doesn't have access to A's private members.

What the compiler does here is create a class type that has appropriate members to store any captured variables, an appropriate operator() etc -- which is exactly what you would write yourself if you wanted to emulate lambdas in C++03. This type would certainly not have access to private members, which might make it easier to visualize why the limitation exists and why there is no workaround.

Update regarding possible workarounds:

It would be better to say "there are no workarounds using a lambda", because in general workarounds do exist although they require that you forgo the convenient lambda syntax. For example, you could:

  1. Write a local class type that explicitly captures this along with any other locals it requires (inspired by Björn Pollex's comment below).
  2. Write a private method instead of a lambda and pass that as the callback (e.g. using std::bind for convenience). If you want to capture locals in addition to this you can use more std::bind at the call site to do so.
  • 2
    It works with a local struct though (ideone.com/AvsBE). Can you explain the difference? – Björn Pollex Aug 13 '12 at 12:13
  • @BjörnPollex: That's a local struct, which is why it has access to the private members of its containing type (quoting the book: The local class is in the scope of the enclosing scope, and has the same access to names outside the function as does the enclosing function.). You could say that it's a functional workaround though. – Jon Aug 13 '12 at 12:15
  • @Jon: That doesn't explain why the compiler doesn't simply make the closure type a friend of the class it's a member of. If it can capture this implicitly, thus effectively acting like a member function, it should be able to reach other private members. – Nicol Bolas Aug 13 '12 at 12:20
  • @NicolBolas: There's no technical reason it couldn't be made a friend by default, but it doesn't sound like a good idea to me. If you need access to private members there are more verbose workarounds that do not break encapsulation (will update the answer soon). – Jon Aug 13 '12 at 12:25
  • 3
    Did the version of the draft you referred to not include the following, or did you leave it out of the answer for a reason? whose properties are described below. This class type is not an aggregate (8.5.1). The closure type is declared in the smallest block scope, class scope, or namespace scope that contains the corresponding lambda-expression. I find it really relevant, especially in connection with §11.7 on nested classes as also mentioned by Juraj. – Tommy Andersen Feb 19 '15 at 10:24
3

Workaround:

typedef  bool (A::*MemFn)(void) const;

bool A::hasGrandChild() const {
    MemFn f = &A::hasChild;
    return any_of(childs_.begin(), childs_.end(), [=](A const &a) {
            return (a.*f)();
    });
}
  • 1
    Wait. Why the the heck wouldn't you just do any_of(begin, end, std::mem_fn(&A::hasChild)) than? Besides the minor performance penalty. – pmr Aug 13 '12 at 13:27
  • @pmr - This is mainly to illustrate how to access private member functions in lambda expressions. – Henrik Aug 13 '12 at 13:30
  • @pmr: Performance penalty? I wouldn't expect one; it's quite obvious to a reasonable compiler that f doesn't change. – MSalters Aug 14 '12 at 7:13
  • @MSalters I wouldn't have expected that too. I experienced and measured a small performance penalty when using mem_fn. But maybe I'm wrong. – pmr Aug 14 '12 at 7:40
3

You can capture this explicitly and make it a "member lambda" that has access to private members.

For example, consider the following sample:

#include <iostream>
class A {
private:
    void f() { std::cout << "Private"; }
public:
    void g() { 
        [this] { 
            f(); 
            // doesn't need qualification 
        }(); 
    }
};
class B {
private:
    void f() { std::cout << "Private"; }
public:
    void g() { [] { f(); }(); } // compiler error
};
int main() {
    A a;
    a.g();
}
0

It isn't possible because the lambda is not a part of the class. It's the same as making an out-of-class function, and calling it instead of creating a lambda. Of course it doesn't have access to private members.

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