429

What is the difference between:

@Entity
public class Company {

    @OneToMany(cascade = CascadeType.ALL , fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    @JoinColumn(name = "companyIdRef", referencedColumnName = "companyId")
    private List<Branch> branches;
    ...
}

and

@Entity
public class Company {

    @OneToMany(cascade = CascadeType.ALL , fetch = FetchType.LAZY, mappedBy = "companyIdRef")
    private List<Branch> branches;
    ...
}
474

The annotation @JoinColumn indicates that this entity is the owner of the relationship (that is: the corresponding table has a column with a foreign key to the referenced table), whereas the attribute mappedBy indicates that the entity in this side is the inverse of the relationship, and the owner resides in the "other" entity. This also means that you can access the other table from the class which you've annotated with "mappedBy" (fully bidirectional relationship).

In particular, for the code in the question the correct annotations would look like this:

@Entity
public class Company {
    @OneToMany(fetch = FetchType.LAZY, mappedBy = "company")
    private List<Branch> branches;
}

@Entity
public class Branch {
    @ManyToOne(fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    @JoinColumn(name = "companyId")
    private Company company;
}
  • 3
    in both cases Branch has field with Company id. – Mykhaylo Adamovych Aug 13 '12 at 16:25
  • 3
    Company table doesn't have a column with a foreign key to the referenced table - Branch has ref to Company.. why are you saying "the corresponding table has a column with a foreign key to the referenced table" ? Could you explain some more pls. – Mykhaylo Adamovych Aug 13 '12 at 16:33
  • 11
    @MykhayloAdamovych I updated my answer with sample code. Notice that it's a mistake to use @JoinColumn in Company – Óscar López Aug 13 '12 at 16:33
  • 9
    @MykhayloAdamovych: No, that's actually not quite right. If Branch doesn't have a property which references Company, but the underlying table has a column which does, then you can use @JoinTable to map it. This is an unusual situation, because you would normally map the column in the object which corresponds to its table, but it can happen, and it is perfectly legitimate. – Tom Anderson Aug 13 '12 at 17:02
  • 3
    This is another reason not to like ORM's. The documentation is often too dodgy, and in my books, this is meandering on the too much magic territory. I've been struggling with this issue and when followed word by word for a @OneToOne, the child rows get updated with a null in their FKey column that references the parent. – Ashesh Mar 5 '16 at 17:59
181

@JoinColumn could be used on both sides of the relationship. The question was about using @JoinColumn on the @OneToMany side (rare case). And the point here is in physical information duplication (column name) along with not optimized SQL query that will produce some additional UPDATE statements.

According to documentation:

Since many to one are (almost) always the owner side of a bidirectional relationship in the JPA spec, the one to many association is annotated by @OneToMany(mappedBy=...)

@Entity
public class Troop {
    @OneToMany(mappedBy="troop")
    public Set<Soldier> getSoldiers() {
    ...
}

@Entity
public class Soldier {
    @ManyToOne
    @JoinColumn(name="troop_fk")
    public Troop getTroop() {
    ...
} 

Troop has a bidirectional one to many relationship with Soldier through the troop property. You don't have to (must not) define any physical mapping in the mappedBy side.

To map a bidirectional one to many, with the one-to-many side as the owning side, you have to remove the mappedBy element and set the many to one @JoinColumn as insertable and updatable to false. This solution is not optimized and will produce some additional UPDATE statements.

@Entity
public class Troop {
    @OneToMany
    @JoinColumn(name="troop_fk") //we need to duplicate the physical information
    public Set<Soldier> getSoldiers() {
    ...
}

@Entity
public class Soldier {
    @ManyToOne
    @JoinColumn(name="troop_fk", insertable=false, updatable=false)
    public Troop getTroop() {
    ...
}
  • 1
    I am not able to figure out how Troop can be owner in your second snippet, Soldier is still the owner, as it contains foreign key referencing to Troop. (I am using mysql, I checked with your approach). – Akhilesh Oct 30 '13 at 7:46
  • this was taken 'as is' from documentation page (bold is mine) – Mykhaylo Adamovych Nov 1 '13 at 17:43
  • 8
    In your exemple the annotation mappedBy="troop" refer to which field? – Fractaliste Mar 25 '14 at 9:16
  • 4
    @Fractaliste the annotation mappedBy="troop" refers to the property troop in the class Soldier. In the code above the property is not visible because here Mykhaylo omitted it, but you can deduce its existence by the getter getTroop(). Check the answer of Óscar López, it is very clear and you will get the point. – nicolimo86 Sep 30 '15 at 19:49
  • 1
    If you're using JPA 2.x, my answer below is a little cleaner. Though I suggest trying both routes and seeing what Hibernate does when it generates the tables. If you're on a new project, pick whichever generation you think fits your needs. If you're on a legacy database and don't want to change the structure, pick whichever matches your schema. – Snekse Mar 7 '17 at 16:36
28

The annotation mappedBy ideally should always be used in the Parent side (Company class) of the bi directional relationship, in this case it should be in Company class pointing to the member variable 'company' of the Child class (Branch class)

The annotation @JoinColumn is used to specify a mapped column for joining an entity association, this annotation can be used in any class (Parent or Child) but it should ideally be used only in one side (either in parent class or in Child class not in both) here in this case i used it in the Child side (Branch class) of the bi directional relationship indicating the foreign key in the Branch class.

below is the working example :

parent class , Company

@Entity
public class Company {


    private int companyId;
    private String companyName;
    private List<Branch> branches;

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    @Column(name="COMPANY_ID")
    public int getCompanyId() {
        return companyId;
    }

    public void setCompanyId(int companyId) {
        this.companyId = companyId;
    }

    @Column(name="COMPANY_NAME")
    public String getCompanyName() {
        return companyName;
    }

    public void setCompanyName(String companyName) {
        this.companyName = companyName;
    }

    @OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY,cascade=CascadeType.ALL,mappedBy="company")
    public List<Branch> getBranches() {
        return branches;
    }

    public void setBranches(List<Branch> branches) {
        this.branches = branches;
    }


}

child class, Branch

@Entity
public class Branch {

    private int branchId;
    private String branchName;
    private Company company;

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    @Column(name="BRANCH_ID")
    public int getBranchId() {
        return branchId;
    }

    public void setBranchId(int branchId) {
        this.branchId = branchId;
    }

    @Column(name="BRANCH_NAME")
    public String getBranchName() {
        return branchName;
    }

    public void setBranchName(String branchName) {
        this.branchName = branchName;
    }

    @ManyToOne(fetch=FetchType.LAZY)
    @JoinColumn(name="COMPANY_ID")
    public Company getCompany() {
        return company;
    }

    public void setCompany(Company company) {
        this.company = company;
    }


}
  • Thanks for "Company class pointing to the member variable 'company' of the Child class (Branch class)" – Hassan Tareq Jan 18 at 4:55
21

As I explained in this article, if you use the @OneToMany annotation with @JoinColumn, then you have a unidirectional association.

If you use the @OneToMany with the mappedBy attribute set, you have a bidirectional association, meaning you need to have a @ManyToOne association on the child side which the mappedBy references.

The unidirectional @OneToMany association does not perform very well, so you should avoid it.

You are better off using the bidirectional @OneToMany which is more efficient.

  • Simple and concise. This must be marked as the correct answer. – Shirgill Farhan Ansari Nov 18 '18 at 10:42
  • Very well explained in your Article ! – AnirbanDebnath Dec 30 '18 at 12:09
19

I'd just like to add that @JoinColumn does not always have to be related to the physical information location as this answer suggests. You can combine @JoinColumn with @OneToMany even if the parent table has no table data pointing to the child table.

How to define unidirectional OneToMany relationship in JPA

Unidirectional OneToMany, No Inverse ManyToOne, No Join Table

It seems to only be available in JPA 2.x+ though. It's useful for situations where you want the child class to just contain the ID of the parent, not a full on reference.

  • you are right, support for unidirectional OneToMany without join table is introduced in JPA2 – aurelije Dec 29 '16 at 10:38
1

I disagree with the accepted answer here by Óscar López. That answer is inaccurate!

It is NOT @JoinColumn which indicates that this entity is the owner of the relationship. Instead, it is the @ManyToOne annotation which does this (in his example).

The relationship annotations such as @ManyToOne, @OneToMany and @ManyToMany tell JPA/Hibernate to create a mapping. By default, this is done through a seperate Join Table.


@JoinColumn

The purpose of @JoinColumn is to create a join column if one does not already exist. If it does, then this annotation can be used to name the join column.


MappedBy

The purpose of the MappedBy parameter is to instruct JPA: Do NOT create another join table as the relationship is already being mapped by the opposite entity of this relationship.



Remember: MappedBy is a property of the relationship annotations whose purpose is to generate a mechanism to relate two entities which by default they do by creating a join table. MappedBy halts that process in one direction.

The entity not using MappedBy is said to be the owner of the relationship because the mechanics of the mapping are dictated within its class through the use of one of the three mapping annotations against the foreign key field. This not only specifies the nature of the mapping but also instructs the creation of a join table. Furthermore, the option to suppress the join table also exists by applying @JoinColumn annotation over the foreign key which keeps it inside the table of the owner entity instead.

So in summary: @JoinColumn either creates a new join column or renames an existing one; whilst the MappedBy parameter works collaboratively with the relationship annotations of the other (child) class in order to create a mapping either through a join table or by creating a foreign key column in the associated table of the owner entity.

To illustrate how MapppedBy works, consider the code below. If MappedBy parameter were to be deleted, then Hibernate would actually create TWO join tables! Why? Because there is a symmetry in many-to-many relationships and Hibernate has no rationale for selecting one direction over the other.

We therefore use MappedBy to tell Hibernate, we have chosen the other entity to dictate the mapping of the relationship between the two entities.

@Entity
public class Driver {
    @ManyToMany(mappedBy = "drivers")
    private List<Cars> cars;
}

@Entity
public class Cars {
    @ManyToMany
    private List<Drivers> drivers;
}

Adding @JoinColumn(name = "driverID") in the owner class (see below), will prevent the creation of a join table and instead, create a driverID foreign key column in the Cars table to construct a mapping:

@Entity
public class Driver {
    @ManyToMany(mappedBy = "drivers")
    private List<Cars> cars;
}

@Entity
public class Cars {
    @ManyToMany
    @JoinColumn(name = "driverID")
    private List<Drivers> drivers;
}

protected by Community Jun 3 '15 at 22:35

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