325

Scenario:

trait A {
    function calc($v) {
        return $v+1;
    }
}

class MyClass {
    use A;

    function calc($v) {
        $v++;
        return A::calc($v);
    }
}

print (new MyClass())->calc(2); // should print 4

This code doesn't work, and I cannot find a way to call a trait function like it was inherited. I tried calling self::calc($v), static::calc($v), parent::calc($v), A::calc($v) and the following:

trait A {
    function calc($v) {
        return $v+1;
    }
}

class MyClass {
    use A {
        calc as traitcalc;
    }

    function calc($v) {
        $v++;
        return traitcalc($v);
    }
}

Nothing works.

Is there a way to make it work or must I override completely the trait function which is much more complex than this :)

555

Your last one was almost there:

trait A {
    function calc($v) {
        return $v+1;
    }
}

class MyClass {
    use A {
        calc as protected traitcalc;
    }

    function calc($v) {
        $v++;
        return $this->traitcalc($v);
    }
}

The trait is not a class. You can't access its members directly. It's basically just automated copy and paste...

  • 13
    just to clarify - once your class defines the same method, it automatically overrides the trait's. The trait fills in the method as @ircmaxell mentions when it's empty. – Yehosef Jun 8 '14 at 12:43
  • 2
    @PhillipWhelan would be nice if you could add more information on what does "not work as expected". Written like that it doesn't help much in understanding what kind of wrong behaviour to expect, and does not assure us that this is not a temporary mistake of you. Maybe there is some SO question about the issue you are talking about? (Eventually) Thanks. – Kamafeather Mar 29 '15 at 14:40
  • 1
    I see now that what PhillipWhelan said is fine if he would have used commas, like so: "The other methods the trait is pulling in may not work, as expected, when you do this." In other words, he is saying that the other trait methods aren't working at all. malhal clarifies this point for us in their comment. – OCDev Dec 25 '15 at 15:06
  • 2
    Just for reference: If your trait function would be static you could access the function by calling A::calc(1) – velop Mar 24 '17 at 22:26
  • 1
    As Phillip mentioned (I think), how would you do this for one method of a trait while still including all other methods of the same trait as normal? Preferrably without explicitly referencing each method. – Gannet May 1 '17 at 3:41
10

If the class implements the method directly, it will not use the traits version. Perhaps what you are thinking of is:

trait A {
    function calc($v) {
        return $v+1;
    }
}

class MyClass {
    function calc($v) {
        return $v+2;
    }
}

class MyChildClass extends MyClass{
}

class MyTraitChildClass extends MyClass{
    use A;
}

print (new MyChildClass())->calc(2); // will print 4

print (new MyTraitChildClass())->calc(2); // will print 3

Because the child classes do not implement the method directly, they will first use that of the trait if there otherwise use that of the parent class.

If you want, the trait can use method in the parent class (assuming you know the method would be there) e.g.

trait A {
    function calc($v) {
        return parent::calc($v*3);
    }
}
// .... other code from above
print (new MyTraitChildClass())->calc(2); // will print 8 (2*3 + 2)

You can also provide for ways to override, but still access the trait method as follows:

trait A {
    function trait_calc($v) {
        return $v*3;
    }
}

class MyClass {
    function calc($v) {
        return $v+2;
    }
}


class MyTraitChildClass extends MyClass{
    use A {
      A::trait_calc as calc;
    }
}


class MySecondTraitChildClass extends MyClass{
    use A {
      A::trait_calc as calc;
    }

    public function calc($v) {
      return $this->trait_calc($v)+.5;
    }
}


print (new MyTraitChildClass())->calc(2); // will print 6
echo "\n";
print (new MySecondTraitChildClass())->calc(2); // will print 6.5

You can see it work at http://sandbox.onlinephpfunctions.com/code/e53f6e8f9834aea5e038aec4766ac7e1c19cc2b5

7

An alternative approach if interested - with an extra intermediate class to use the normal OOO way. This simplifies the usage with parent::methodname

trait A {
    function calc($v) {
        return $v+1;
    }
}

// an intermediate class that just uses the trait
class IntClass {
    use A;
}

// an extended class from IntClass
class MyClass extends IntClass {
    function calc($v) {
        $v++;
        return parent::calc($v);
    }
}
  • 5
    This approach will shave any advantage you have by using traits. Like combining multiple traits in multiple classes (e.g. trait A, B in a class, trait B, C, D in another class, trait A, C in another class and so on) – Ionuț Staicu Aug 21 '15 at 5:50
  • 3
    No, using this approach you still have the advantages of having a trait. You can use this trait in IntClass, but you can also use it in many another classes if you want to. Trait will be useless, if it was used only in IntClass. In that case, it would be better to place calc() method directly in that class. – marcini Jul 13 '16 at 8:11
  • This totally wouldn't work for me. ScreenablePerson::save() exists, Candidate uses Validating trait and extends ScreenablePerson, and all three classes have save(). – Theodore R. Smith Dec 11 '18 at 23:39
0

Using another trait:

trait ATrait {
    function calc($v) {
        return $v+1;
    }
}

class A {
    use ATrait;
}

trait BTrait {
    function calc($v) {
        $v++;
        return parent::calc($v);
    }
}

class B extends A {
    use BTrait;
}

print (new B())->calc(2); // should print 4

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.