73

JavaScript code I'm starting with:

function doSomething(url) {  
   $.ajax({
      type: "GET",  
      url: url,  
      dataType: "xml",  
      success: rssToTarget  
   });  
}    

Pattern I would like to use:

//where elem is the target that should receive new items via DOM (appendChild)
function doSomething(url, elem) {
   $.ajax({
      type: "GET",
      url: url,
      dataType: "xml",
      success: rssToTarget(elem)
   });
}  

I don't think I can get the callback to work this way, right? What is the proper pattern? I don't want to use global variables necessarily to temporarily hold the elem or elem name.

  • stackoverflow.com/questions/2602981/… use invokedata – Roman Rhrn Nesterov Mar 27 '12 at 6:10
  • For future reference: You need to store the callback function (rssToTarget) within the success property of the object literal you are passing to $.ajax(), so jQuery can call that function once the AJAX request is completed. By adding (elem) to the end of the function name, you are mistakenly invoking rssToTarget and storing its return value within success. In JS, adding parentheses at the end of a function name will invoke it. – BrunoFacca Feb 24 '17 at 18:00
95

Like this...

function doSomething(url, elem) {
  $.ajax({
     type: "GET",
     url: url,
     dataType: "xml",
     success: function(xml) {
       rssToTarget(xml, elem);
     }
  });
}

Answer to your comment: Does use of anonymous functions affect performance?

  • 3
    aha +1. Do you pay any performance price for creating anon functions everywhere? – BuddyJoe Jul 28 '09 at 13:42
  • 2
    And I guess it would really be.... success: function(xml) { rssToTarget(xml, elem); } – BuddyJoe Jul 28 '09 at 13:43
  • If you concur can you update the answer? Thanks Josh – BuddyJoe Jul 28 '09 at 13:46
  • 1
    I've updated the answer – Josh Stodola Jul 28 '09 at 14:15
  • if you wrap your $.ajax call in a loop, this approach will create new function (function(xml) { ... }) for every loop, consuming more memory. – stack247 Aug 19 '15 at 21:57
30

The pattern you'd like to use could work if you create a closure inside your rssToTarget function:

function rssToTarget(element) {
  return function (xmlData) {
    // work with element and the data returned from the server
  }
}

function doSomething(url, elem) {
    $.ajax({ type: "GET",
         url: url,
         dataType: "xml",
         success: rssToTarget(elem)
       });
}

When rssToTarget(elem) is executed, the element parameter is stored in the closure, and the callback function is returned, waiting to be executed.

  • -1 You cant set success to a function that returns a function. – Josh Stodola Jul 28 '09 at 14:11
  • I forgot to add " but requires a parameter" – Josh Stodola Jul 28 '09 at 14:12
  • 3
    of course you can return a function check the code running! jsbin.com/anepo/edit – CMS Jul 28 '09 at 14:19
  • 3
    The returned anonymous function has an input parameter... JavaScript functional capabilities allows you to do that and more with functions... – CMS Jul 28 '09 at 14:25
  • 1
    This answer more faithfully reproduces what the OP wanted to achieve than the accepted answer does. – sage88 Apr 17 '14 at 6:02

protected by Will Dec 10 '10 at 14:02

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