480

How do I download a file with Node.js without using third-party libraries?

I don't need anything special. I only want to download a file from a given URL, and then save it to a given directory.

  • 5
    "download a file with node.js" - do you mean upload to the server? or retrieve a file from a remote server using your server? or serve a file to a client for download from your node.js server? – Joseph Aug 14 '12 at 2:23
  • 79
    "I only want to download a file from a given url, and then save it to a given directory," it seems pretty clear. :) – Michelle Tilley Aug 14 '12 at 2:26
  • 42
    Joseph is making an incorrect assertion that all node processes are server processes – lededje Dec 8 '13 at 14:36
  • 1
    @lededje What prevents a server process from downloading a file and saving it to a directory on a server? It is prefectly doable. – Gherman Feb 21 at 8:51

28 Answers 28

642

You can create an HTTP GET request and pipe its response into a writable file stream:

const http = require('http');
const fs = require('fs');

const file = fs.createWriteStream("file.jpg");
const request = http.get("http://i3.ytimg.com/vi/J---aiyznGQ/mqdefault.jpg", function(response) {
  response.pipe(file);
});

If you want to support gathering information on the command line--like specifying a target file or directory, or URL--check out something like Commander.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    I got the following console output when I ran this script: node.js:201 throw e; // process.nextTick error, or 'error' event on first tick ^ Error: connect ECONNREFUSED at errnoException (net.js:646:11) at Object.afterConnect [as oncomplete] (net.js:637:18) . – Anderson Green Jan 1 '13 at 6:15
  • 9
    Does this code close the file properly when the script ends or would it lose data? – philk May 20 '15 at 19:29
  • 2
    @quantumpotato Take a look at the response you're getting back from your request – Michelle Tilley May 8 '18 at 18:30
  • 7
    This depends upon the req url type if you are requesting https you must use https otherwise it will throw error. – Krishnadas PC Sep 19 '18 at 13:20
  • 1
    This code does not properly close the fs write. It is not noticable on very small files but it is definitely obvious on larger downloads. – Ethan Keiley Sep 1 at 14:46
535

Don't forget to handle errors! The following code is based on Augusto Roman's answer.

var http = require('http');
var fs = require('fs');

var download = function(url, dest, cb) {
  var file = fs.createWriteStream(dest);
  var request = http.get(url, function(response) {
    response.pipe(file);
    file.on('finish', function() {
      file.close(cb);  // close() is async, call cb after close completes.
    });
  }).on('error', function(err) { // Handle errors
    fs.unlink(dest); // Delete the file async. (But we don't check the result)
    if (cb) cb(err.message);
  });
};
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    @vince-yuan is download() itself pipeable? – rasx May 13 '15 at 20:53
  • @theGrayFox Because the code in this answer is way longer than the accepted one. :) – pootow Sep 28 '15 at 2:33
  • 2
    @Abdul Sounds like you are very new to node.js/javascript. Take a look at this tutorial: tutorialspoint.com/nodejs/nodejs_callbacks_concept.htm It's not complex. – Vince Yuan Mar 7 '16 at 0:59
  • 1
    @Abdul maybe it would be good if you share with the rest of the class what you have figured out ? – Curtwagner1984 Oct 25 '16 at 8:54
  • 5
    Is there a way to see the speed of the download? Like can track how many mb/s? Thanks! – Tino Caer Apr 19 '17 at 18:24
155

As Michelle Tilley said, but with the appropriate control flow:

var http = require('http');
var fs = require('fs');

var download = function(url, dest, cb) {
  var file = fs.createWriteStream(dest);
  http.get(url, function(response) {
    response.pipe(file);
    file.on('finish', function() {
      file.close(cb);
    });
  });
}

Without waiting for the finish event, naive scripts may end up with an incomplete file.

Edit: Thanks to @Augusto Roman for pointing out that cb should be passed to file.close, not called explicitly.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    the callback is confusing me. if I now invoke download(), how would I do it? What would I place as the cb argument? I have the download('someURI', '/some/destination', cb) but don't understand what to put in the cb – Abdul Mar 6 '16 at 22:43
  • 1
    @Abdul You specify the callback with a function only if you need to do something when the file has been successfully fetched. – CatalinBerta May 17 '16 at 10:57
67

Speaking of handling errors, it's even better listening to request errors too. I'd even validate by checking response code. Here it's considered success only for 200 response code, but other codes might be good.

const fs = require('fs');
const http = require('http');

const download = (url, dest, cb) => {
    const file = fs.createWriteStream(dest);

    const request = http.get(url, (response) => {
        // check if response is success
        if (response.statusCode !== 200) {
            return cb('Response status was ' + response.statusCode);
        }

        response.pipe(file);
    });

    // close() is async, call cb after close completes
    file.on('finish', () => file.close(cb));

    // check for request error too
    request.on('error', (err) => {
        fs.unlink(dest);
        return cb(err.message);
    });

    file.on('error', (err) => { // Handle errors
        fs.unlink(dest); // Delete the file async. (But we don't check the result) 
        return cb(err.message);
    });
};

Despite the relative simplicity of this code, I would advise to use the request module as it handles many more protocols (hello HTTPS!) which aren't natively supported by http.

That would be done like so:

const fs = require('fs');
const request = require('request');

const download = (url, dest, cb) => {
    const file = fs.createWriteStream(dest);
    const sendReq = request.get(url);

    // verify response code
    sendReq.on('response', (response) => {
        if (response.statusCode !== 200) {
            return cb('Response status was ' + response.statusCode);
        }

        sendReq.pipe(file);
    });

    // close() is async, call cb after close completes
    file.on('finish', () => file.close(cb));

    // check for request errors
    sendReq.on('error', (err) => {
        fs.unlink(dest);
        return cb(err.message);
    });

    file.on('error', (err) => { // Handle errors
        fs.unlink(dest); // Delete the file async. (But we don't check the result)
        return cb(err.message);
    });
};
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    The request module just works straight for HTTPs. Cool! – Thiago C. S Ventura Jun 30 '16 at 16:07
  • @ventura yep, btw, there's also the native https module that now can handle secure connections. – Buzut Jul 1 '16 at 17:40
  • It's more error prone without a doubt. Anyway, in any case where using request module is an option, I'd advise it as it's way higher level and thus, easier and efficient. – Buzut Jul 2 '16 at 7:23
  • 2
    @Alex, nope, this is an error message and there's a return. So if response.statusCode !== 200 the cb on finish will never be called. – Buzut Feb 6 '17 at 23:53
  • 1
    Thank you for showing example using request module. – Pete Alvin Jul 4 '18 at 9:20
48

gfxmonk's answer has a very tight data race between the callback and the file.close() completing. file.close() actually takes a callback that is called when the close has completed. Otherwise, immediate uses of the file may fail (very rarely!).

A complete solution is:

var http = require('http');
var fs = require('fs');

var download = function(url, dest, cb) {
  var file = fs.createWriteStream(dest);
  var request = http.get(url, function(response) {
    response.pipe(file);
    file.on('finish', function() {
      file.close(cb);  // close() is async, call cb after close completes.
    });
  });
}

Without waiting for the finish event, naive scripts may end up with an incomplete file. Without scheduling the cb callback via close, you may get a race between accessing the file and the file actually being ready.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    What for are you storing request into a variable? – polkovnikov.ph Sep 8 '14 at 17:12
  • he "stores" it into a variable so it does not become a global variable by default. – philk Jul 29 '15 at 11:27
  • @philk how do you know a global variable is created if var request = is removed? – ma11hew28 Oct 29 '18 at 13:24
  • You are right, there is no need to save the request, its not used anyway. That's what you mean? – philk Oct 31 '18 at 14:26
19

Maybe node.js has changed, but it seems there are some problems with the other solutions (using node v8.1.2):

  1. You don't need to call file.close() in the finish event. Per default the fs.createWriteStream is set to autoClose: https://nodejs.org/api/fs.html#fs_fs_createwritestream_path_options
  2. file.close() should be called on error. Maybe this is not needed when the file is deleted (unlink()), but normally it is: https://nodejs.org/api/stream.html#stream_readable_pipe_destination_options
  3. Temp file is not deleted on statusCode !== 200
  4. fs.unlink() without a callback is deprecated (outputs warning)
  5. If dest file exists; it is overridden

Below is a modified solution (using ES6 and promises) which handles these problems.

const http = require("http");
const fs = require("fs");

function download(url, dest) {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        const file = fs.createWriteStream(dest, { flags: "wx" });

        const request = http.get(url, response => {
            if (response.statusCode === 200) {
                response.pipe(file);
            } else {
                file.close();
                fs.unlink(dest, () => {}); // Delete temp file
                reject(`Server responded with ${response.statusCode}: ${response.statusMessage}`);
            }
        });

        request.on("error", err => {
            file.close();
            fs.unlink(dest, () => {}); // Delete temp file
            reject(err.message);
        });

        file.on("finish", () => {
            resolve();
        });

        file.on("error", err => {
            file.close();

            if (err.code === "EEXIST") {
                reject("File already exists");
            } else {
                fs.unlink(dest, () => {}); // Delete temp file
                reject(err.message);
            }
        });
    });
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Two comments on this: 1) it should probably reject Error objects, not strings, 2) fs.unlink will quietly swallow errors which might not necessarily be what you want to do – Richard Nienaber May 22 '18 at 10:29
  • 1
    This works great! And if your URLs use HTTPS, just substitute const https = require("https"); for const http = require("http"); – Russ Jun 14 '19 at 22:50
15

Solution with timeout, prevent memory leak :

The following code is based on Brandon Tilley's answer :

var http = require('http'),
    fs = require('fs');

var request = http.get("http://example12345.com/yourfile.html", function(response) {
    if (response.statusCode === 200) {
        var file = fs.createWriteStream("copy.html");
        response.pipe(file);
    }
    // Add timeout.
    request.setTimeout(12000, function () {
        request.abort();
    });
});

Don't make file when you get an error, and prefere to use timeout to close your request after X secondes.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    this is only a file, has no protocol or server to download from... http.get("http://example.com/yourfile.html",function(){}) – mjz19910 May 1 '18 at 4:06
  • Is there a memory leak in this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/22793628/242933? – ma11hew28 Oct 29 '18 at 13:30
  • You can add timeout like I did in http.get. The memory leak is only if the file take too long to be downloaded. – A-312 Nov 2 '18 at 8:11
14

for those who came in search of es6-style promise based way, I guess it would be something like:

var http = require('http');
var fs = require('fs');

function pDownload(url, dest){
  var file = fs.createWriteStream(dest);
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    var responseSent = false; // flag to make sure that response is sent only once.
    http.get(url, response => {
      response.pipe(file);
      file.on('finish', () =>{
        file.close(() => {
          if(responseSent)  return;
          responseSent = true;
          resolve();
        });
      });
    }).on('error', err => {
        if(responseSent)  return;
        responseSent = true;
        reject(err);
    });
  });
}

//example
pDownload(url, fileLocation)
  .then( ()=> console.log('downloaded file no issues...'))
  .catch( e => console.error('error while downloading', e));
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    responseSet flag caused, for some reason which I hadn't had the time to investigate, my file to be downloaded incompletely. No errors popped up but the .txt file I was populating had half of the rows that needed to be there. Removing the logic for the flag fixed it. Just wanted to point that out if someone had the issues with the approach. Still, +1 – Milan Velebit Oct 5 '18 at 13:46
6

Vince Yuan's code is great but it seems to be something wrong.

function download(url, dest, callback) {
    var file = fs.createWriteStream(dest);
    var request = http.get(url, function (response) {
        response.pipe(file);
        file.on('finish', function () {
            file.close(callback); // close() is async, call callback after close completes.
        });
        file.on('error', function (err) {
            fs.unlink(dest); // Delete the file async. (But we don't check the result)
            if (callback)
                callback(err.message);
        });
    });
}
| improve this answer | |
  • can we specify the destination folder? – user11327631 Aug 23 '19 at 9:32
6

I prefer request() because you can use both http and https with it.

request('http://i3.ytimg.com/vi/J---aiyznGQ/mqdefault.jpg')
  .pipe(fs.createWriteStream('cat.jpg'))
| improve this answer | |
5
const download = (url, path) => new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
http.get(url, response => {
    const statusCode = response.statusCode;

    if (statusCode !== 200) {
        return reject('Download error!');
    }

    const writeStream = fs.createWriteStream(path);
    response.pipe(writeStream);

    writeStream.on('error', () => reject('Error writing to file!'));
    writeStream.on('finish', () => writeStream.close(resolve));
});}).catch(err => console.error(err));
| improve this answer | |
5

Hi,I think you can use child_process module and curl command.

const cp = require('child_process');

let download = async function(uri, filename){
    let command = `curl -o ${filename}  '${uri}'`;
    let result = cp.execSync(command);
};


async function test() {
    await download('http://zhangwenning.top/20181221001417.png', './20181221001417.png')
}

test()

In addition,when you want download large、multiple files,you can use cluster module to use more cpu cores.

| improve this answer | |
5

✅So if you use pipeline, it would close all other streams and make sure that there are no memory leaks.

Working example:

const http = require('http');
const { pipeline } = require('stream');
const fs = require('fs');

const file = fs.createWriteStream('./file.jpg');

http.get('http://via.placeholder.com/150/92c952', response => {
  pipeline(
    response,
    file,
    err => {
      if (err)
        console.error('Pipeline failed.', err);
      else
        console.log('Pipeline succeeded.');
    }
  );
});

From my answer to "What's the difference between .pipe and .pipeline on streams".

| improve this answer | |
4

You can use https://github.com/douzi8/ajax-request#download

request.download('http://res.m.ctrip.com/html5/Content/images/57.png', 
  function(err, res, body) {}
);
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    It is returning garbage character if file name is other than ascii like if filename is in japanese. – Deepak Goel Feb 21 '15 at 5:44
  • 4
    Do you think ajax-request is not a third party library? – Murat Çorlu Aug 23 '18 at 12:22
4

Download using promise, which resolve a readable stream. put extra logic to handle the redirect.

var http = require('http');
var promise = require('bluebird');
var url = require('url');
var fs = require('fs');
var assert = require('assert');

function download(option) {
    assert(option);
    if (typeof option == 'string') {
        option = url.parse(option);
    }

    return new promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        var req = http.request(option, function(res) {
            if (res.statusCode == 200) {
                resolve(res);
            } else {
                if (res.statusCode === 301 && res.headers.location) {
                    resolve(download(res.headers.location));
                } else {
                    reject(res.statusCode);
                }
            }
        })
        .on('error', function(e) {
            reject(e);
        })
        .end();
    });
}

download('http://localhost:8080/redirect')
.then(function(stream) {
    try {

        var writeStream = fs.createWriteStream('holyhigh.jpg');
        stream.pipe(writeStream);

    } catch(e) {
        console.error(e);
    }
});
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    302 is also HTTP status code for URL redirect, so you should use this [301,302].indexOf(res.statusCode) !== -1 in the if statement – sidanmor Nov 27 '16 at 16:36
  • The questions was specific to not include third party modes :) – David Gatti Dec 26 '16 at 12:21
3

If you are using express use res.download() method. otherwise fs module use.

app.get('/read-android', function(req, res) {
   var file = "/home/sony/Documents/docs/Android.apk";
    res.download(file) 
}); 

(or)

   function readApp(req,res) {
      var file = req.fileName,
          filePath = "/home/sony/Documents/docs/";
      fs.exists(filePath, function(exists){
          if (exists) {     
            res.writeHead(200, {
              "Content-Type": "application/octet-stream",
              "Content-Disposition" : "attachment; filename=" + file});
            fs.createReadStream(filePath + file).pipe(res);
          } else {
            res.writeHead(400, {"Content-Type": "text/plain"});
            res.end("ERROR File does NOT Exists.ipa");
          }
        });  
    }
| improve this answer | |
3

Based on the other answers above and some subtle issues, here is my attempt.

  1. Only create the fs.createWriteStream if you get a 200 OK status code. This reduces the amount of fs.unlink commands required to tidy up temporary file handles.
  2. Even on a 200 OK we can still possibly reject due to an EEXIST file already exists.
  3. Recursively call download if you get a 301 Moved Permanently or 302 Found (Moved Temporarily) redirect following the link location provided in the header.
  4. The issue with some of the other answers recursively calling download was that they called resolve(download) instead of download(...).then(() => resolve()) so the Promise would return before the download actually finished. This way the nested chain of promises resolve in the correct order.
  5. It might seem cool to clean up the temp file asynchronously, but I chose to reject only after that completed too so I know that everything start to finish is done when this promise resolves or rejects.
const https = require('https');
const fs = require('fs');

/**
 * Download a resource from `url` to `dest`.
 * @param {string} url - Valid URL to attempt download of resource
 * @param {string} dest - Valid path to save the file.
 * @returns {Promise<void>} - Returns asynchronously when successfully completed download
 */
function download(url, dest) {
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    const request = https.get(url, response => {
      if (response.statusCode === 200) {
 
        const file = fs.createWriteStream(dest, { flags: 'wx' });
        file.on('finish', () => resolve());
        file.on('error', err => {
          file.close();
          if (err.code === 'EEXIST') reject('File already exists');
          else fs.unlink(dest, () => reject(err.message)); // Delete temp file
        });
        response.pipe(file);
      } else if (response.statusCode === 302 || response.statusCode === 301) {
        //Recursively follow redirects, only a 200 will resolve.
        download(response.headers.location, dest).then(() => resolve());
      } else {
        reject(`Server responded with ${response.statusCode}: ${response.statusMessage}`);
      }
    });

    request.on('error', err => {
      reject(err.message);
    });
  });
}
| improve this answer | |
2

Path : img type : jpg random uniqid

    function resim(url) {

    var http = require("http");
    var fs = require("fs");
    var sayi = Math.floor(Math.random()*10000000000);
    var uzanti = ".jpg";
    var file = fs.createWriteStream("img/"+sayi+uzanti);
    var request = http.get(url, function(response) {
  response.pipe(file);
});

        return sayi+uzanti;
}
| improve this answer | |
2

download.js (i.e. /project/utils/download.js)

const fs = require('fs');
const request = require('request');

const download = (uri, filename, callback) => {
    request.head(uri, (err, res, body) => {
        console.log('content-type:', res.headers['content-type']);
        console.log('content-length:', res.headers['content-length']);

        request(uri).pipe(fs.createWriteStream(filename)).on('close', callback);
    });
};

module.exports = { download };


app.js

... 
// part of imports
const { download } = require('./utils/download');

...
// add this function wherever
download('https://imageurl.com', 'imagename.jpg', () => {
  console.log('done')
});
| improve this answer | |
1

Writing my own solution since the existing didn't fit my requirements.

What this covers:

  • HTTPS download (switch package to http for HTTP downloads)
  • Promise based function
  • Handle forwarded path (status 302)
  • Browser header - required on a few CDNs
  • Filename from URL (as well as hardcoded)
  • Error handling

It's typed, it's safer. Feel free to drop the types if you're working with plain JS (no Flow, no TS) or convert to a .d.ts file

index.js

import httpsDownload from httpsDownload;
httpsDownload('https://example.com/file.zip', './');

httpsDownload.[js|ts]

import https from "https";
import fs from "fs";
import path from "path";

function download(
  url: string,
  folder?: string,
  filename?: string
): Promise<void> {
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    const req = https
      .request(url, { headers: { "User-Agent": "javascript" } }, (response) => {
        if (response.statusCode === 302 && response.headers.location != null) {
          download(
            buildNextUrl(url, response.headers.location),
            folder,
            filename
          )
            .then(resolve)
            .catch(reject);
          return;
        }

        const file = fs.createWriteStream(
          buildDestinationPath(url, folder, filename)
        );
        response.pipe(file);
        file.on("finish", () => {
          file.close();
          resolve();
        });
      })
      .on("error", reject);
    req.end();
  });
}

function buildNextUrl(current: string, next: string) {
  const isNextUrlAbsolute = RegExp("^(?:[a-z]+:)?//").test(next);
  if (isNextUrlAbsolute) {
    return next;
  } else {
    const currentURL = new URL(current);
    const fullHost = `${currentURL.protocol}//${currentURL.hostname}${
      currentURL.port ? ":" + currentURL.port : ""
    }`;
    return `${fullHost}${next}`;
  }
}

function buildDestinationPath(url: string, folder?: string, filename?: string) {
  return path.join(folder ?? "./", filename ?? generateFilenameFromPath(url));
}

function generateFilenameFromPath(url: string): string {
  const urlParts = url.split("/");
  return urlParts[urlParts.length - 1] ?? "";
}

export default download;
| improve this answer | |
0

Without library it could be buggy just to point out. Here are a few:

Here my suggestion:

  • Call system tool like wget or curl
  • use some tool like node-wget-promise which also very simple to use. var wget = require('node-wget-promise'); wget('http://nodejs.org/images/logo.svg');
| improve this answer | |
0
function download(url, dest, cb) {

  var request = http.get(url, function (response) {

    const settings = {
      flags: 'w',
      encoding: 'utf8',
      fd: null,
      mode: 0o666,
      autoClose: true
    };

    // response.pipe(fs.createWriteStream(dest, settings));
    var file = fs.createWriteStream(dest, settings);
    response.pipe(file);

    file.on('finish', function () {
      let okMsg = {
        text: `File downloaded successfully`
      }
      cb(okMsg);
      file.end(); 
    });
  }).on('error', function (err) { // Handle errors
    fs.unlink(dest); // Delete the file async. (But we don't check the result)
    let errorMsg = {
      text: `Error in file downloadin: ${err.message}`
    }
    if (cb) cb(errorMsg);
  });
};
| improve this answer | |
0

You can try using res.redirect to the https file download url, and then it will be downloading the file.

Like: res.redirect('https//static.file.com/file.txt');

| improve this answer | |
0
var fs = require('fs'),
    request = require('request');

var download = function(uri, filename, callback){
    request.head(uri, function(err, res, body){
    console.log('content-type:', res.headers['content-type']);
    console.log('content-length:', res.headers['content-length']);
    request(uri).pipe(fs.createWriteStream(filename)).on('close', callback);

    }); 
};   

download('https://www.cryptocompare.com/media/19684/doge.png', 'icons/taskks12.png', function(){
    console.log('done');
});
| improve this answer | |
0

Here's yet another way to handle it without 3rd party dependency and also searching for redirects:

        var download = function(url, dest, cb) {
            var file = fs.createWriteStream(dest);
            https.get(url, function(response) {
                if ([301,302].indexOf(response.statusCode) !== -1) {
                    body = [];
                    download(response.headers.location, dest, cb);
                  }
              response.pipe(file);
              file.on('finish', function() {
                file.close(cb);  // close() is async, call cb after close completes.
              });
            });
          }

| improve this answer | |
0

I suggest you to use res.download same as follow:

app.get('/download', function(req, res){
  const file = `${__dirname}/folder/abc.csv`;
  res.download(file); // Set disposition and send it.
});
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-3

We can use the download node module and its very simple, please refer below https://www.npmjs.com/package/download

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  • 2
    The question is asking how to do it "without using third-party libraries". – ma11hew28 Oct 29 '18 at 13:38
-4
var requestModule=require("request");

requestModule(filePath).pipe(fs.createWriteStream('abc.zip'));
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  • 7
    Code dumps are generally not useful and may be downvoted or deleted. It would be worth editing to at least explain what the code is doing for future visitors. – Bugs Jun 1 '17 at 9:30

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