45

So my first attempt did everything out of the code behind, and now I'm trying to refactor my code to use the MVVM pattern, following the guidance of the MVVM in the box information.

I've created a viewmodel class to match my view class, and I'm moving the code out of the code behind into the viewmodel starting with the commands.

My first snag is trying to implement a 'Close' button that closes the window if the data has not been modified. I've rigged up a CloseCommand to replace the 'onClick' method and all is good except for where the code tries to run this.Close(). Obviously, since the code has been moved from a window to a normal class, 'this' isn't a window and therefore isn't closeable. However, according to MVVM, the viewmodel doesn't know about the view, so i can't call view.Close().

Can someone suggest how I can close the window from the viewmodel command?

3
  • 1
    Several options have already been discussed [stackoverflow.com/questions/4376475/… Generally the approach I would use is the CommandParameter with a relative source back to the calling Window. (As demonstrated by Simone)
    – Steve Py
    Commented Aug 14, 2012 at 5:27
  • does this solution require Expression Blend? I'm challenged on that front
    – mcalex
    Commented Aug 14, 2012 at 5:44
  • See how to use attached property to solve this here
    – dvvrd
    Commented Aug 14, 2012 at 6:04

13 Answers 13

70

I personally use a very simple approach: for every ViewModel that is related to a closeable View, I created a base ViewModel like this following example:

public abstract class CloseableViewModel
{
    public event EventHandler ClosingRequest;

    protected void OnClosingRequest()
    {
        if (this.ClosingRequest != null)
        {
            this.ClosingRequest(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }
}

Then in your ViewModel that inherits from CloseableViewModel, simply call this.OnClosingRequest(); for the Close command.

In the view:

public class YourView
{
    ...
    var vm = new ClosableViewModel();
    this.Datacontext = vm;
    vm.ClosingRequest += (sender, e) => this.Close();
}
2
  • 1
    I think this is a very nice way of doing this! Commented Aug 3, 2013 at 15:21
  • 1
    Nice solution, very handful.
    – Lucy82
    Commented Jul 14, 2020 at 10:44
29

You don't need to pass the View instance to your ViewModel layer. You can access the main window like this -

Application.Current.MainWindow.Close()

I see no issue in accessing your main window in ViewModel class as stated above. As per MVVM principle there should not be tight coupling between your View and ViewModel i.e. they should work be oblivious of others operation. Here, we are not passing anything to ViewModel from View. If you want to look for other options this might help you - Close window using MVVM

7
  • 4
    I like this, but is coupling between the viewmodel and the application allowed/approved?
    – mcalex
    Commented Aug 14, 2012 at 9:24
  • 3
    Coupling is when you pass data across layer using instance variables but here you are accessing the static property of application to get the window. For me its not a violation of any rule of MVVM.
    – Rohit Vats
    Commented Aug 14, 2012 at 9:42
  • 15
    @Rohit: You couple your viewmodel to WPF this way. (Application class) Commented Jul 8, 2014 at 11:12
  • @g.pickardou - Like I said in the above comment (if you read it) that it's completely upto the person. I see no violation of MVVM here since View and ViewModel and oblivious to each other. That's why I also give OP with a link in case this doesn't fit his needs, he can create wrapper service to achieve that OR also can achieve this using attached behaviour (which already mentioned in other great answers here).
    – Rohit Vats
    Commented Jul 8, 2014 at 12:05
  • 8
    @RohitVats this IS a violation of MVVM. Splitting Views and ViewModels brings to portability: I can realize a Console Application, a background process, a SilverLight web site, a mobile App, leaving all the ViewModels the same, changing only the Views. So, calling something like "MainWindow" on a ViewModel is totally wrong. In a background process what does it mean "close the main window"? Or in a test-case suite? And if the window to close is not the main? The best way to handle these problems without violating MVVM is to inject View instances in the ViewModels' properties through interfaces Commented Oct 3, 2016 at 15:09
26

My solution to close a window from view model while clicking a button is as follows:

In view model

public RelayCommand CloseWindow;
Constructor()
{
    CloseWindow = new RelayCommand(CloseWin);
}

public void CloseWin(object obj)
{
    Window win = obj as Window;
    win.Close();
}

In View, set as follows

<Button Command="{Binding CloseWindowCommand}" CommandParameter="{Binding ElementName=WindowNameTobeClose}" Content="Cancel" />
4
  • agreed, saves on code in the view (that might get forgotten about!) and doesn't force you to do the DataContext assignment in the view either.
    – cjb110
    Commented Dec 2, 2014 at 9:28
  • 9
    Aren't you making view-model aware of the view (Window)? Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 21:18
  • I always get a Null-Reference-Exception, as obj is null in my case? But i do CommandParameter="{Binding ElementName=myWindow}"in XAML, what can be wrong?
    – CeOnSql
    Commented Jun 24, 2016 at 9:07
  • You are not giving the window a name.
    – lorengphd
    Commented Feb 7, 2017 at 22:02
14

I do it by creating a attached property called DialogResult:

public static class DialogCloser
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty DialogResultProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached(
            "DialogResult",
            typeof(bool?),
            typeof(DialogCloser),
            new PropertyMetadata(DialogResultChanged));

    private static void DialogResultChanged(
        DependencyObject d,
        DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var window = d as Window;
        if (window != null && (bool?)e.NewValue == true) 
                window.Close();
    }

    public static void SetDialogResult(Window target, bool? value)
    {
        target.SetValue(DialogResultProperty, value);
    }
}

then write this to you XAML, in the window tag

WindowActions:DialogCloser.DialogResult="{Binding Close}"

finally in the ViewModel

    private bool _close;
    public bool Close
    {
        get { return _close; }
        set
        {
            if (_close == value)
                return;
            _close = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("Close");
        }
    }

if you change the Close to true, the window will be closed

Close = True;
1
  • Thanks, will give this a try. Where does the NotifyPropertyChanged sit and what does it look like?
    – mcalex
    Commented Aug 14, 2012 at 8:13
7

Here is the simplest and pure MVVM solution

ViewModel Code

public class ViewModel
{
    public Action CloseAction { get; set; }

    private void CloseCommandFunction()
    {
        CloseAction();
    }
}

Here is XAML View Code

public partial class DialogWindow : Window
{
    public DialogWindow()
    {
        ViewModel vm = new ViewModel();
        this.DataContext = vm;

        vm.CloseAction = Close;
    }
}
3
  • simple and effective :) Commented Nov 5, 2018 at 17:43
  • Very nice approach! Commented Nov 29, 2022 at 15:38
  • 1
    The last line can be simplified as vm.CloseAction = Close; Commented Dec 23, 2022 at 8:10
4

This solution is quick and easy. Downside is that there is some coupling between the layers.

In your viewmodel:

public class MyWindowViewModel: ViewModelBase
{


    public Command.StandardCommand CloseCommand
    {
        get
        {
            return new Command.StandardCommand(Close);
        }
    }
    public void Close()
    {
        foreach (System.Windows.Window window in System.Windows.Application.Current.Windows)
        {
            if (window.DataContext == this)
            {
                window.Close();
            }
        }
    }
}
1
  • like this approach too, but a bit worried about scalability.
    – cjb110
    Commented Dec 2, 2014 at 9:29
4

MVVM-light with a custom message notification to avoid the window to process every notificationmessage

In the viewmodel:

public class CloseDialogMessage : NotificationMessage
{
    public CloseDialogMessage(object sender) : base(sender, "") { }
}

private void OnClose()
{
    Messenger.Default.Send(new CloseDialogMessage(this));
}

Register the message in the window constructor:

Messenger.Default.Register<CloseDialogMessage>(this, nm =>
{
    Close();
});
2

This is very similar to eoldre's answer. It's functionally the same in that it looks through the same Windows collection for a window that has the view model as its datacontext; but I've used a RelayCommand and some LINQ to achieve the same result.

public RelayCommand CloseCommand
{
    get
    {
        return new RelayCommand(() => Application.Current.Windows
            .Cast<Window>()
            .Single(w => w.DataContext == this)
            .Close());
    }
}
2

using MVVM-light toolkit:

In the ViewModel:

 public void notifyWindowToClose()
{
    Messenger.Default.Send<NotificationMessage>(
        new NotificationMessage(this, "CloseWindowsBoundToMe")
    );
}

And in the View:

 Messenger.Default.Register<NotificationMessage>(this, (nm) =>
{
    if (nm.Notification == "CloseWindowsBoundToMe")
    {
        if (nm.Sender == this.DataContext)
            this.Close();
    }
});
0

This is taken from ken2k answer (thanks!), just adding the CloseCommand also to the base CloseableViewModel.

public class CloseableViewModel
{
    public CloseableViewModel()
    {
        CloseCommand = new RelayCommand(this.OnClosingRequest);
    }

    public event EventHandler ClosingRequest;

    protected void OnClosingRequest()
    {
        if (this.ClosingRequest != null)
        {
            this.ClosingRequest(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }

    public RelayCommand CloseCommand
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }
}

Your view model, inherits it

public class MyViewModel : CloseableViewModel

Then on you view

public MyView()
{
    var viewModel = new StudyDataStructureViewModel(studyId);
    this.DataContext = viewModel;

    //InitializeComponent(); ...

    viewModel.ClosingRequest += (sender, e) => this.Close();
}
0

Given a way, Please check

https://stackoverflow.com/a/30546407/3659387

Short Description

  1. Derive your ViewModel from INotifyPropertyChanged
  2. Create a observable property CloseDialog in ViewModel, Change CloseDialog property whenever you want to close the dialog.
  3. Attach a Handler in View for this property change
  4. Now you are almost done. In the event handler make DialogResult = true
0

first of all give your window a name like

x:Name="AboutViewWindow"

on my close button I've defined Command and Command Parameter like

CommandParameter="{Binding ElementName=AboutViewWindow}"
Command="{Binding CancelCommand}"

then in my view model

private ICommand _cancelCommand;        
public ICommand CancelCommand       
{
   get          
     {
        if (_cancelCommand == null)
           {
              _cancelCommand = new DelegateCommand<Window>(
                    x =>
                    {
                        x?.Close();
                    });
            }

            return _cancelCommand;          
     }      
}
0

Most MVVM-compliant solution using HanumanInstitute.MvvmDialogs

Implement ICloseable interface in your ViewModel and that's it!

No code in your view whatsoever.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.