38

I'm trying to calculate the total, mean and median of an array thats populated by input received by a textfield. I've managed to work out the total and the mean, I just can't get the median to work. I think the array needs to be sorted before I can do this, but I'm not sure how to do this. Is this the problem, or is there another one that I didn't find? Here is my code:

import java.applet.Applet;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;

public class whileloopq extends Applet implements ActionListener
{
    Label label;
    TextField input;
    int num;
    int index;
    int[] numArray = new int[20];
    int sum;
    int total;
    double avg;
    int median;



    public void init ()
    {
        label = new Label("Enter numbers");
        input = new TextField(5);
        add(label);
        add(input);
        input.addActionListener(this);
        index = 0;
    }

    public void actionPerformed (ActionEvent ev)
    {
        int num = Integer.parseInt(input.getText());
        numArray[index] = num;
        index++;
        if (index == 20)
        input.setEnabled(false);
            input.setText("");
        sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < numArray.length; i++)
        {
            sum += numArray[i];
        }
        total = sum;
        avg = total / index;

        median = numArray[numArray.length/2];



        repaint();

    }



    public void paint (Graphics graf)
    {



        graf.drawString("Total   = " + Integer.toString(total), 25, 85);
        graf.drawString("Average = " + Double.toString(avg), 25, 100);
        graf.drawString("Median = " + Integer.toString(median), 25, 115);



    }
}

15 Answers 15

65

The Arrays class in Java has a static sort function, which you can invoke with Arrays.sort(numArray).

Arrays.sort(numArray);
double median;
if (numArray.length % 2 == 0)
    median = ((double)numArray[numArray.length/2] + (double)numArray[numArray.length/2 - 1])/2;
else
    median = (double) numArray[numArray.length/2];
  • 6
    I think the else clause should be: median = (double) numArray[(numArray.length - 1)/2]; – FBB Jun 25 '16 at 19:42
  • 8
    @FBB they give the same result. We enter the else clause when the length is odd, so it's 2*k + 1 for some integer k. Half of it is k + 0.5, but when it's turned into integer (because its an array index), it's turned to just k. – ivant Feb 28 '17 at 12:53
  • 2
    And what if array contains only one elment? Your code will crash with out of bound exception. – Eldar Agalarov Nov 12 '18 at 13:58
  • @EldarAgalarov why should it crash with out of bound exception if the array contains only one element? A length of one is odd, so it goes into the else case, where it tries to access the element at numArray.length/2. Since numArray.length is one, it calculates the index as 1/2 which gives 0. And 0 is a valid index for an array of length one. – Thomas Kläger Feb 10 at 20:03
35

Sorting the array is unnecessary and inefficient. There's a variation of the QuickSort (QuickSelect) algorithm which has an average run time of O(n); if you sort first, you're down to O(n log n). It actually finds the nth smallest item in a list; for a median, you just use n = half the list length. Let's call it quickNth (list, n).

The concept is that to find the nth smallest, choose a 'pivot' value. (Exactly how you choose it isn't critical; if you know the data will be thoroughly random, you can take the first item on the list.)

Split the original list into three smaller lists:

  • One with values smaller than the pivot.
  • One with values equal to the pivot.
  • And one with values greater than the pivot.

You then have three cases:

  1. The "smaller" list has >= n items. In that case, you know that the nth smallest is in that list. Return quickNth(smaller, n).
  2. The smaller list has < n items, but the sum of the lengths of the smaller and equal lists have >= n items. In this case, the nth is equal to any item in the "equal" list; you're done.
  3. n is greater than the sum of the lengths of the smaller and equal lists. In that case, you can essentially skip over those two, and adjust n accordingly. Return quickNth(greater, n - length(smaller) - length(equal)).

Done.

If you're not sure that the data is thoroughly random, you need to be more sophisticated about choosing the pivot. Taking the median of the first value in the list, the last value in the list, and the one midway between the two works pretty well.

If you're very unlucky with your choice of pivots, and you always choose the smallest or highest value as your pivot, this takes O(n^2) time; that's bad. But, it's also very unlikely if you choose your pivot with a decent algorithm.

Sample QuickSelect code

  • 1
    Good answerm but a link to an implementation would have made it better. – Snicolas Mar 4 '17 at 17:45
  • 2
    Excellent idea. I've edited the original to link to some sample code I wrote, using ArrayLists rather than arrays. – Bruce Feist Mar 5 '17 at 16:25
9

If you want to use any external library here is Apache commons math library using you can calculate the Median.
For more methods and use take look at the API documentation

import org.apache.commons.math3.*;
.....
......
........
//calculate median
public double getMedian(double[] values){
 Median median = new Median();
 double medianValue = median.evaluate(values);
 return medianValue;
}
.......

Update

Calculate in program

Generally, median is calculated using the following two formulas given here

If n is odd then Median (M) = value of ((n + 1)/2)th item term.
If n is even then Median (M) = value of [((n)/2)th item term + ((n)/2 + 1)th item term ]/2

In your program you have numArray, first you need to sort array using Arrays#sort

Arrays.sort(numArray);
int middle = numArray.length/2;
int medianValue = 0; //declare variable 
if (numArray.length%2 == 1) 
    medianValue = numArray[middle];
else
   medianValue = (numArray[middle-1] + numArray[middle]) / 2;
  • I would change a line. median = numArray[middle-1] + Math.abs(numArray[middle-1] - numArray[middle] )/2; for two middle add up to more than int max cases – Unu Dec 8 '13 at 4:26
4
Arrays.sort(numArray);
int middle = ((numArray.length) / 2);
if(numArray.length % 2 == 0){
 int medianA = numArray[middle];
 int medianB = numArray[middle-1];
 median = (medianA + medianB) / 2;
} else{
 median = numArray[middle + 1];
}

EDIT: I initially had medianB setting to middle+1 in the even length arrays, this was wrong due to arrays starting count at 0. I have updated it to use middle-1 which is correct and should work properly for an array with an even length.

  • Nope, that is not correct: for an input like [5, 6, 7, 10], your code snippet computes the median to be (7+10)/2 while it should be (6+7)/2. – Hbf May 19 '13 at 16:15
  • @Hbf you were right, I saw the issue with the calculation with an even array and fixed it. Changing middle+1 to middle-1 in the "even" logic should fix the logic properly. – Walls May 20 '13 at 13:13
  • 1
    errmmm... when using this in Java for Android, your even calculation is still not quite correct. For example: numArray is 1,2,3,4,7,7 and your code would return "3.0", whereas it should be "3.5". To address this, add "d" after the "2" so that your line reads: median = (medianA + medianB) / 2d; This ensures the values is not floored to 3.0 BTW, this would also be fine: median = ((double)(medianA + medianB) / 2); – user1207504 Jul 25 '13 at 8:58
  • missing the case where length == 1 too – user1382306 Mar 17 '14 at 19:21
3

You can find good explanation at https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=23&v=VmogG01IjYc

The idea it to use 2 Heaps viz one max heap and mean heap.

class Heap {
private Queue<Integer> low = new PriorityQueue<>(Comparator.reverseOrder());
private Queue<Integer> high = new PriorityQueue<>();

public void add(int number) {
    Queue<Integer> target = low.size() <= high.size() ? low : high;
    target.add(number);
    balance();
}

private void balance() {
    while(!low.isEmpty() && !high.isEmpty() && low.peek() > high.peek()) {
        Integer lowHead= low.poll();
        Integer highHead = high.poll();
        low.add(highHead);
        high.add(lowHead);
    }
}

public double median() {
    if(low.isEmpty() && high.isEmpty()) {
        throw new IllegalStateException("Heap is empty");
    } else {
        return low.size() == high.size() ? (low.peek() + high.peek()) / 2.0 : low.peek();
    }
}

}

2

Try sorting the array first. Then after it's sorted, if the array has an even amount of elements the mean of the middle two is the median, if it has a odd number, the middle element is the median.

2

Use Arrays.sort and then take the middle element (in case the number n of elements in the array is odd) or take the average of the two middle elements (in case n is even).

  public static long median(long[] l)
  {
    Arrays.sort(l);
    int middle = l.length / 2;
    if (l.length % 2 == 0)
    {
      long left = l[middle - 1];
      long right = l[middle];
      return (left + right) / 2;
    }
    else
    {
      return l[middle];
    }
  }

Here are some examples:

  @Test
  public void evenTest()
  {
    long[] l = {
        5, 6, 1, 3, 2
    };
    Assert.assertEquals((3 + 4) / 2, median(l));
  }

  @Test
  public oddTest()
  {
    long[] l = {
        5, 1, 3, 2, 4
    };
    Assert.assertEquals(3, median(l));
  }

And in case your input is a Collection, you might use Google Guava to do something like this:

public static long median(Collection<Long> numbers)
{
  return median(Longs.toArray(numbers)); // requires import com.google.common.primitives.Longs;
}
2

I was looking at the same statistics problems. The approach you are thinking it is good and it will work. (Answer to the sorting has been given)

But in case you are interested in algorithm performance, I think there are a couple of algorithms that have better performance than just sorting the array, one (QuickSelect) is indicated by @bruce-feist's answer and is very well explained.

[Java implementation: https://discuss.leetcode.com/topic/14611/java-quick-select ]

But there is a variation of this algorithm named median of medians, you can find a good explanation on this link: http://austinrochford.com/posts/2013-10-28-median-of-medians.html

Java implementation of this: - https://stackoverflow.com/a/27719796/957979

2
Arrays.sort(numArray);
return (numArray[size/2] + numArray[(size-1)/2]) / 2;
1

I faced a similar problem yesterday. I wrote a method with Java generics in order to calculate the median value of every collection of Numbers; you can apply my method to collections of Doubles, Integers, Floats and returns a double. Please consider that my method creates another collection in order to not alter the original one. I provide also a test, have fun. ;-)

public static <T extends Number & Comparable<T>> double median(Collection<T> numbers){
    if(numbers.isEmpty()){
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Cannot compute median on empty collection of numbers");
    }
    List<T> numbersList = new ArrayList<>(numbers);
    Collections.sort(numbersList);
    int middle = numbersList.size()/2;
    if(numbersList.size() % 2 == 0){
        return 0.5 * (numbersList.get(middle).doubleValue() + numbersList.get(middle-1).doubleValue());
    } else {
        return numbersList.get(middle).doubleValue();
    }

}

JUnit test code snippet:

/**
 * Test of median method, of class Utils.
 */
@Test
public void testMedian() {
    System.out.println("median");
    Double expResult = 3.0;
    Double result = Utils.median(Arrays.asList(3.0,2.0,1.0,9.0,13.0));
    assertEquals(expResult, result);
    expResult = 3.5;
    result = Utils.median(Arrays.asList(3.0,2.0,1.0,9.0,4.0,13.0));
    assertEquals(expResult, result);
}

Usage example (consider the class name is Utils):

List<Integer> intValues = ... //omitted init
Set<Float> floatValues = ... //omitted init
.....
double intListMedian = Utils.median(intValues);
double floatSetMedian = Utils.median(floatValues);

Note: my method works on collections, you can convert arrays of numbers to list of numbers as pointed here

1

And nobody paying attention when list contains only one element (list.size == 1). All your answers will crash with index out of bound exception, because integer division returns zero (1 / 2 = 0). Correct answer (in Kotlin):

MEDIAN("MEDIAN") {

        override fun calculate(values: List<BigDecimal>): BigDecimal? {
            if (values.size == 1) {
                return values.first()
            }
            if (values.size > 1) {
                val valuesSorted = values.sorted()
                val mid = valuesSorted.size / 2
                return if (valuesSorted.size % 2 != 0) {
                    valuesSorted[mid]
                } else {
                    AVERAGE.calculate(listOf(valuesSorted[mid - 1], valuesSorted[mid]))
                }
            }
            return null
        }
    },
1

As @Bruce-Feist mentions, for a large number of elements, I'd avoid any solution involving sort if performance is something you are concerned about. A different approach than those suggested in the other answers is Hoare's algorithm to find the k-th smallest of element of n items. This algorithm runs in O(n).

public int findKthSmallest(int[] array, int k)
{
    if (array.length < 10)
    {
        Arrays.sort(array);
        return array[k];
    }
    int start = 0;
    int end = array.length - 1;
    int x, temp;
    int i, j;
    while (start < end)
    {
        x = array[k];
        i = start;
        j = end;
        do
        {
            while (array[i] < x)
                i++;
            while (x < array[j])
                j--;
            if (i <= j)
            {
                temp = array[i];
                array[i] = array[j];
                array[j] = temp;
                i++;
                j--;
            }
        } while (i <= j);
        if (j < k)
            start = i;
        if (k < i)
            end = j;
    }
    return array[k];
}

And to find the median:

public int median(int[] array)
{
    int length = array.length;
    if ((length & 1) == 0) // even
        return (findKthSmallest(array, array.length / 2) + findKthSmallest(array, array.length / 2 + 1)) / 2;
    else // odd
        return findKthSmallest(array, array.length / 2);
}
0

Check out the Arrays.sort methods:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Arrays.html

You should also really abstract finding the median into its own method, and just return the value to the calling method. This will make testing your code much easier.

0
public int[] data={31, 29, 47, 48, 23, 30, 21
        , 40, 23, 39, 47, 47, 42, 44, 23, 26, 44, 32, 20, 40};

public double median()
    {
        Arrays.sort(this.data);
        double result=0;
        int size=this.data.length;


        if(size%2==1)
        {
            result=data[((size-1)/2)+1];
            System.out.println(" uneven size : "+result);
        }
        else
        { 
            int middle_pair_first_index =(size-1)/2;
            result=(data[middle_pair_first_index+1]+data[middle_pair_first_index])/2;
            System.out.println(" Even size : "+result);
        }

        return result;
    }
0

Fast & Low Memory Live Median Calculator

It is based on the answer of @Abhijit Gaikwad and the youtube video mentioned in his answer.

We don't need to store all the values in memory to calculate the median. We just need two values and two Counts. Assuming data is in ascending order:

  • Maximum of Lower Half Of Our Data
  • Minimum of Upper Half of Our Data
  • Size of Lower Half Of Our Data
  • Size of Upper Half of Our Data

Here are the key points:

  • The smaller elements go in the lower half and vice versa
  • When the elements are odd the Maximum of LowerHalf is returned
  • When the elements are even the average of both is taken.

Here is an implementation with Generics. One has to implement an average method based on ones data structure.

LiveMedianCalculator

abstract class LiveMedianCalculator<T extends Comparable<T>> {

    private T maxOfLowerHalf;
    private T lowestOfUpperHalf;

    private int lowerHalfCount;
    private int upperHalfCount;

    public void add(T e) {
        if (lowerHalfCount <= upperHalfCount) {

            if (maxOfLowerHalf == null) {
                maxOfLowerHalf = e;
            }
            else if (maxOfLowerHalf.compareTo(e) < 0) { // pick large one
                maxOfLowerHalf = e;
            }
            lowerHalfCount++;
        }
        else {
            if (lowestOfUpperHalf == null) {
                lowestOfUpperHalf = e;
            }
            else if (lowestOfUpperHalf.compareTo(e) > 0) { // pick small one
                lowestOfUpperHalf = e;
            }
            upperHalfCount++;
        }

        //swap if lower > upper
        if (lowestOfUpperHalf != null && maxOfLowerHalf.compareTo(lowestOfUpperHalf) > 0) {
            T x = maxOfLowerHalf;
            maxOfLowerHalf = lowestOfUpperHalf;
            lowestOfUpperHalf = x;
        }
    }

    public T median() {
        if (lowerHalfCount == upperHalfCount) {
            return average(maxOfLowerHalf, lowestOfUpperHalf);
        }
        else {
            return maxOfLowerHalf;
        }
    }

    public abstract T average(T e1, T e2);
}

Usage

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        LiveMedianCalculator<Double> doubleMedianCalc = new LiveMedianCalculator<Double>() {
            @Override
            public Double average(Double e1, Double e2) {
                return (e1 + e2) / 2.0d;
            }
        };

        Stream.of(9.0d, 1.0d, 1.5d, 5.0d, 2.3d)
                .forEach(doubleMedianCalc::add);

        System.out.println(doubleMedianCalc.median()); // 2.3

        doubleMedianCalc.add(2.2d);

        System.out.println(doubleMedianCalc.median()); // 2.25


        LiveMedianCalculator<MyData> customMedianCalc = new LiveMedianCalculator<MyData>() {
            @Override
            public MyData average(MyData e1, MyData e2) {
                return MyData.average(e1, e2);
            }
        };

        Stream.of(9.0d, 1.0d, 1.5d, 5.0d, 2.3d)
                .map(e -> new MyData(e, e.toString()))
                .forEach(customMedianCalc::add);

        System.out.println(customMedianCalc.median()); // 2.3

        customMedianCalc.add(new MyData(2.2d, "2.2"));

        System.out.println(customMedianCalc.median()); // 2.25


    }

Custom Data Type

class MyData implements Comparable<MyData> {

    Double x;
    String a;

    public MyData(Double x, String a) {
        this.x = x;
        this.a = a;
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(MyData o) {
        return x != null ? x.compareTo(o.x) : -1;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "MyData{" +
                "x=" + x +
                ", a='" + a + '\'' +
                '}';
    }

    public static MyData average(MyData e1, MyData e2) {
        return new MyData((e1.x + e2.x) / 2, e1.a + "+" + e2.a);
    }
}

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