35

i have a two list

List<Sent> SentList;
List<Messages> MsgList;

both have the same property called MsgID;

MsgList            SentList  

MsgID Content      MsgID Content Stauts
1       aaa        1       aaa     0
2       bbb        3       ccc     0
3       ccc        
4       ddd
5       eee

i want to compare the MsgID in Msglist with the sentlist and need items which are not in the sent list using linq

Result 

MsgID Content
2       bbb
4       ddd
5       eee
1
  • 3
    Don't forget to mark as correct the answer that helped you with your problem =) – Andre Calil Aug 16 '12 at 16:43

10 Answers 10

47

You could do something like:

HashSet<int> sentIDs = new HashSet<int>(SentList.Select(s => s.MsgID));

var results = MsgList.Where(m => !sentIDs.Contains(m.MsgID));

This will return all messages in MsgList which don't have a matching ID in SentList.

3
  • 2
    This is probably the best approach – lc. Aug 14 '12 at 17:39
  • What if you need to compare more than one property? (Id and version number for example? – NickG Oct 18 '18 at 13:03
  • @NickG then you create a class for it implementing IEqualityComparer<T> and make a HashSet<className> instead. – Mark Cilia Vincenti Jul 22 '19 at 13:30
23

The naive approach:

MsgList.Where(x => !SentList.Any(y => y.MsgID == x.MsgID))

Be aware this will take up to m*n operations as it compares every MsgID in SentList to each in MsgList ("up to" because it will short-circuit when it does happen to match).

3
  • 5
    If you're going to downvote, you could at least do me the common courtesy of explaining why. – lc. Aug 14 '12 at 17:57
  • 1
    How about: MsgList.Where(x => SentList.All(y => y.MsgID == x.MsgID)) – zumalifeguard May 16 '17 at 2:45
  • @zumalifeguard I presume you mean != and if so yes it's a logically equivalent expression which should take the same amount of time. – lc. May 17 '17 at 16:28
16

Well, you already have good answers, but they're most Lambda. A more LINQ approach would be like

var NotSentMessages =
                from msg in MsgList
                where !SentList.Any(x => x.MsgID == msg.MsgID)
                select msg;
5
  • 1
    var NotSentMessages = from msg in MsgList where !SentList.Any(x => x.MsgID == msg.MsgID && x.content == msg.content) select msg; This is better for comparision of multiple properties (combined keys) – Andrew Day Sep 27 '16 at 9:46
  • @AndrewDay yeah but OP said he wanted to check equal IDs, so there's no need to match strings here. – Andre Calil Sep 27 '16 at 14:05
  • - so your code is better code because its extendable. But thats a bad comment???? – Andrew Day Sep 27 '16 at 14:52
  • @AndrewDay not at all man, I'm just explaining why I only matched IDs. :) – Andre Calil Sep 27 '16 at 16:13
  • @AndreCalil Calil: LINQ supports two syntaxes... "Query syntax and method syntax are semantically identical..." from docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/programming-guide/… – AlanK Jun 21 '19 at 6:40
8

You can do something like

var notSent = MsgSent.Except(MsgList, MsgIdEqualityComparer);

You will need to provide a custom equality comparer as outlined on MSDN

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb336390.aspx

Simply have that equality comparer base equality only on MsgID property of each respective type. Since the equality comparer compares two instances of the same type, you would need to define an interface or common base type that both Sent and Messages implement that has a MsgID property.

0
7

You can do like this,this is the quickest process

Var result = MsgList.Except(MsgList.Where(o => SentList.Select(s => s.MsgID).ToList().Contains(o.MsgID))).ToList();

This will give you expected output.

2

Try,

  public class Sent
{
    public int MsgID;
    public string Content;
    public int Status;

}

public class Messages
{
    public int MsgID;
    public string Content;
}

  List<Sent> SentList = new List<Sent>() { new Sent() { MsgID = 1, Content = "aaa", Status = 0 }, new Sent() { MsgID = 3, Content = "ccc", Status = 0 } };
            List<Messages> MsgList = new List<Messages>() { new Messages() { MsgID = 1, Content = "aaa" }, new Messages() { MsgID = 2, Content = "bbb" }, new Messages() { MsgID = 3, Content = "ccc" }, new Messages() { MsgID = 4, Content = "ddd" }, new Messages() { MsgID = 5, Content = "eee" }};

            int [] sentMsgIDs = SentList.Select(v => v.MsgID).ToArray();
            List<Messages> result1 = MsgList.Where(o => !sentMsgIDs.Contains(o.MsgID)).ToList<Messages>();

Hope it should help.

0

As an extension method

public static IEnumerable<TSource> AreNotEqual<TSource, TKey, TTarget>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> sourceKeySelector, IEnumerable<TTarget> target, Func<TTarget, TKey> targetKeySelector) 
{
    var targetValues = new HashSet<TKey>(target.Select(targetKeySelector));

    return source.Where(sourceValue => targetValues.Contains(sourceKeySelector(sourceValue)) == false);
}

eg.

public class Customer
{
    public int CustomerId { get; set; }
}

public class OtherCustomer
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}


var customers = new List<Customer>()
{
    new Customer() { CustomerId = 1 },
    new Customer() { CustomerId = 2 }
};

var others = new List<OtherCustomer>()
{
    new OtherCustomer() { Id = 2 },
    new OtherCustomer() { Id = 3 }
};

var result = customers.AreNotEqual(customer => customer.CustomerId, others, other => other.Id).ToList();

Debug.Assert(result.Count == 1);
Debug.Assert(result[0].CustomerId == 1);
2
  • Is ti possible to use multiple properties for the selectors? – Rebecca Jun 17 '20 at 16:05
  • @Rebecca I think this would work :) var result = customers .AreNotEqual(customer => (customer.CustomerId, customer.CustomerName), others, other => (other.Id, other.Name)) .ToList(); – Matt Searles Jun 20 '20 at 9:51
0
List<Person> persons1 = new List<Person>
           {
                    new Person {Id = 1, Name = "Person 1"},
                    new Person {Id = 2, Name = "Person 2"},
                    new Person {Id = 3, Name = "Person 3"},
                    new Person {Id = 4, Name = "Person 4"}
           };


        List<Person> persons2 = new List<Person>
           {
                    new Person {Id = 1, Name = "Person 1"},
                    new Person {Id = 2, Name = "Person 2"},
                    new Person {Id = 3, Name = "Person 3"},
                    new Person {Id = 4, Name = "Person 4"},
                    new Person {Id = 5, Name = "Person 5"},
                    new Person {Id = 6, Name = "Person 6"},
                    new Person {Id = 7, Name = "Person 7"}
           };
        var output = (from ps1 in persons1
                      from ps2 in persons2
                      where ps1.Id == ps2.Id
                      select ps2.Name).ToList();

Person class

public class Person
{        
    public int Id { get; set; }       

    public string Name { get; set; }
}
0

If u wanna Select items of List from 2nd list:

MainList.Where(p => 2ndlist.Contains(p.columns from MainList )).ToList();

-1
List<Car> cars = new List<Car>() {  new Car() { Name = "Ford", Year = 1892, Website = "www.ford.us" }, 
                                    new Car() { Name = "Jaguar", Year = 1892, Website = "www.jaguar.co.uk" }, 
                                    new Car() { Name = "Honda", Year = 1892, Website = "www.honda.jp"} };

List<Factory> factories = new List<Factory>() {     new Factory() { Name = "Ferrari", Website = "www.ferrari.it" }, 
                                                    new Factory() { Name = "Jaguar", Website = "www.jaguar.co.uk" }, 
                                                    new Factory() { Name = "BMW", Website = "www.bmw.de"} };

foreach (Car car in cars.Where(c => !factories.Any(f => f.Name == c.Name))) {
    lblDebug.Text += car.Name;
}
1
  • Ah, exactly the same solution as lc. posted. But, well, here you have it with a full and tested example. – Tys Aug 14 '12 at 17:45

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