11

I've written a program where the user can enter any number of values into a vector and it's supposed to return the quartiles, but I keep getting a "vector subscript out of range" error :

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iomanip>
#include <ios>
#include <vector>

int main () {
    using namespace std;

    cout << "Enter a list of numbers: ";

    vector<double> quantile;
    double x;
    //invariant: homework contains all the homework grades so far
    while (cin >> x)
        quantile.push_back(x);

    //check that the student entered some homework grades
    //typedef vector<double>::size_type vec_sz;
    int size = quantile.size();

    if (size == 0) {
        cout << endl << "You must enter your numbers . "
                        "Please try again." << endl;
        return 1;
    }

    sort(quantile.begin(), quantile.end());

    int mid = size/2;
    double median;
    median = size % 2 == 0 ? (quantile[mid] + quantile[mid-1])/2 : quantile[mid];

    vector<double> first;
    vector<double> third;

    for (int i = 0; i!=mid; ++i)
    {
        first[i] = quantile[i];

    }

        for (int i = mid; i!= size; ++i)
    {
        third[i] = quantile[i];
    }
        double fst;
        double trd;

        int side_length = 0;

        if (size % 2 == 0) 
        {
            side_length = size/2;
        }
        else {
            side_length = (size-1)/2;
        }

        fst = (size/2) % 2 == 0 ? (first[side_length/2]/2 + first[(side_length-1)/2])/2 : first[side_length/2];
        trd = (size/2) % 2 == 0 ? (third[side_length/2]/2 + third[(side_length-1)/2])/2 : third[side_length/2];

    streamsize prec = cout.precision();
    cout << "The quartiles are" <<  setprecision(3) << "1st"
        << fst << "2nd" << median << "3rd" << trd << setprecision(prec) << endl;

    return 0;   

}
5
  • 2
    Your whole size check is better off like if (!quantile.empty()) – chris Aug 15 '12 at 5:33
  • 1
    Your first and third vectors are also empty when being subscripted. – chris Aug 15 '12 at 5:34
  • 1
    You should 'push_back' to add to the (first and third) vectors, not use operator[] – sje397 Aug 15 '12 at 5:37
  • 2
    Why use first and third at all? Can't you just read the relevant element from the original container directly? – Kerrek SB Aug 15 '12 at 5:38
  • Since you have C++ in the tags, I removed it from the title. – Burkhard Aug 15 '12 at 5:45
23

Instead of doing std::sort(quantile.begin(), quantile.end()) a somewhat cheaper way would be

auto const Q1 = quantile.size() / 4;
auto const Q2 = quantile.size() / 2;
auto const Q3 = Q1 + Q2;

std::nth_element(quantile.begin(),          quantile.begin() + Q1, quantile.end());
std::nth_element(quantile.begin() + Q1 + 1, quantile.begin() + Q2, quantile.end());
std::nth_element(quantile.begin() + Q2 + 1, quantile.begin() + Q3, quantile.end());

This would not sort the complete array, but only do a "between groups" sort of the 4 quartile. This saves on the "within groups" sort that a full std::sort would do.

If your quantile array is not large, it's a small optimization. But the scaling behavior of std::nth_element is O(N) however, rather than O(N log N) of a std::sort.

11

Here is Quantile function which is MATLAB's equivalent with linear interpolation:

#include <algorithm>
#include <cmath>
#include <vector>

template<typename T>
static inline double Lerp(T v0, T v1, T t)
{
    return (1 - t)*v0 + t*v1;
}

template<typename T>
static inline std::vector<T> Quantile(const std::vector<T>& inData, const std::vector<T>& probs)
{
    if (inData.empty())
    {
        return std::vector<T>();
    }

    if (1 == inData.size())
    {
        return std::vector<T>(1, inData[0]);
    }

    std::vector<T> data = inData;
    std::sort(data.begin(), data.end());
    std::vector<T> quantiles;

    for (size_t i = 0; i < probs.size(); ++i)
    {
        T poi = Lerp<T>(-0.5, data.size() - 0.5, probs[i]);

        size_t left = std::max(int64_t(std::floor(poi)), int64_t(0));
        size_t right = std::min(int64_t(std::ceil(poi)), int64_t(data.size() - 1));

        T datLeft = data.at(left);
        T datRight = data.at(right);

        T quantile = Lerp<T>(datLeft, datRight, poi - left);

        quantiles.push_back(quantile);
    }

    return quantiles;
}

Find quartiles:

std::vector<double> in = { 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 };
auto quartiles = Quantile<double>(in, { 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 });
4
  • This works brilliantly, and has been battle tested in our codebase. However, it can be made to crash with an "index out of range" error if the input quantile is outside the range 0.0 to 1.0. To fix: within the loop, change size_t left to int64_t left, same with right, then add caps at the other end of the index range: left = std::min(left,static_cast<int64_t>(data.size())-1); right = std::max(right, static_cast<int64_t>(0));. @Yury If there are no disagreements, I could add another answer with the updated code, or we could just edit the code above to fix this corner case. – Contango Oct 29 '20 at 9:59
  • @Contangoit MATLAB/Octave returns -Inf or Inf on these cases which signals as incorrect inputs. My C++ function throwing exception (not just crashing) which is normal although I would prefer to add more info for the user about incorrect input range to the exception. If you wish you may add another answer. – Yury Oct 30 '20 at 11:52
  • @Contango and NumPy throwing an exception "ValueError: Quantiles must be in the range [0, 1]". Just tested – Yury Oct 30 '20 at 11:57
  • Thank you for the feedback. Your code is really very nice and works well, but I have to say that if the code was compiled without checks on out-of-range indexes, then this would silently corrupt memory outside the bounds of the array. Probably better to add specific bounds checking up front. – Contango Oct 30 '20 at 16:23
2

You need to preallocate first and third vectors before you set the contents.

vector<double> first(mid);
vector<double> third(size-mid);

or use push_back instead of assignments to first[i] and third[i]

1

This C++ template function calculates quartile for you. It assumes x to be sorted.

#include <assert.h>

template <typename T1, typename T2> typename T1::value_type quant(const T1 &x, T2 q)
{
    assert(q >= 0.0 && q <= 1.0);
    
    const auto n  = x.size();
    const auto id = (n - 1) * q;
    const auto lo = floor(id);
    const auto hi = ceil(id);
    const auto qs = x[lo];
    const auto h  = (id - lo);
    
    return (1.0 - h) * qs + h * x[hi];
}

To use it do:

std::vector<float> x{1,1,2,2,3,4,5,6};
std::cout << quant(x, 0.25) << std::endl;
std::cout << quant(x, 0.50) << std::endl;
std::cout << quant(x, 0.75) << std::endl;
2
  • This solution assumes the input array x is sorted right? – Samuel Li Sep 9 '19 at 21:42
  • 2
    well, the question doesn't say that the given array is sorted. If you make such an assumption in a solution, state so. Even better, include the sorting step in the solution. – Samuel Li Sep 11 '19 at 4:08
0

If only one element in vector, this instruction is out of range:

quantile[mid-1]

"i" starting from mid so third[0] is out of range

for (int i = mid; i!= size; ++i)
{
    third[i] = quantile[i];
}
0

Here is one error:

vector<double> first;
vector<double> third;

for (int i = 0; i!=mid; ++i)
{
    first[i] = quantile[i];
}

The vector first doesn't have any contents, but you try to access the contents. Same problem with third and its loop. Do you mean to use push_back instead?

0

Implementation for weighted quantiles

This implements a weight functionality for the quantile function with linear interpolation in between the gridpoints.

#include <vector>
#include <numeric>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <assert.h>

// https://stackoverflow.com/a/12399290/7128154
template <typename T>
std::vector<size_t> sorted_index(const std::vector<T> &v) {

  std::vector<size_t> idx(v.size());
  iota(idx.begin(), idx.end(), 0);

  stable_sort(idx.begin(), idx.end(),
       [&v](size_t i1, size_t i2) {return v[i1] < v[i2];});

  return idx;
}
// https://stackoverflow.com/a/1267878/7128154
template< typename order_iterator, typename value_iterator >
void reorder( order_iterator order_begin, order_iterator order_end, value_iterator v )  {
    typedef typename std::iterator_traits< value_iterator >::value_type value_t;
    typedef typename std::iterator_traits< order_iterator >::value_type index_t;
    typedef typename std::iterator_traits< order_iterator >::difference_type diff_t;

    diff_t remaining = order_end - 1 - order_begin;
    for ( index_t s = index_t(), d; remaining > 0; ++ s ) {
        for ( d = order_begin[s]; d > s; d = order_begin[d] ) ;
        if ( d == s ) {
            -- remaining;
            value_t temp = v[s];
            while ( d = order_begin[d], d != s ) {
                swap( temp, v[d] );
                -- remaining;
            }
            v[s] = temp;
        }
    }
}

// https://stackoverflow.com/a/1267878/7128154
template< typename order_iterator, typename value_iterator >
void reorder_destructive( order_iterator order_begin, order_iterator order_end, value_iterator v )  {
    typedef typename std::iterator_traits< value_iterator >::value_type value_t;
    typedef typename std::iterator_traits< order_iterator >::value_type index_t;
    typedef typename std::iterator_traits< order_iterator >::difference_type diff_t;

    diff_t remaining = order_end - 1 - order_begin;
    for ( index_t s = index_t(); remaining > 0; ++ s ) {
        index_t d = order_begin[s];
        if ( d == (diff_t) -1 ) continue;
        -- remaining;
        value_t temp = v[s];
        for ( index_t d2; d != s; d = d2 ) {
            std::swap( temp, v[d] );
            std::swap( order_begin[d], d2 = (diff_t) -1 );
            -- remaining;
        }
        v[s] = temp;
    }
}



// https://stackoverflow.com/a/29677616/7128154
// https://stackoverflow.com/a/37708864/7128154
template <typename T>
double quantile(double q, std::vector<T> values, std::vector<double> weights = std::vector<double>())
{
    assert( 0. <= q && q <= 1. && "expecting quantile in range [0; 1]");
    if (weights.empty())
    {
        weights = std::vector<double>(values.size(), 1.);
    }
    else
    {
        assert (values.size() == weights.size()  && "values and weights missfit in quantiles");
        std::vector<size_t> inds = sorted_index(values);
        reorder_destructive(inds.begin(), inds.end(), weights.begin());
    }

    stable_sort(values.begin(), values.end());
    // values and weights are sorted now

    std::vector<double> quantiles (weights.size());
    quantiles[0] = weights[0];
    for (int ii = 1; ii < quantiles.size(); ii++)
    {
        quantiles[ii] = quantiles[ii-1] + weights[ii];
    }
    double norm = std::accumulate(weights.begin(), weights.end(), 0.0);
    int ind = 0;
    double qCurrent = 0;
    for (; ind < quantiles.size(); ind++)
    {
        qCurrent = (quantiles[ind] - weights[ind] / 2. ) / norm;
        quantiles[ind] = qCurrent;
        if (qCurrent > q)
        {
            if (ind == 0) {return values[0];}
            double rat = (q - quantiles[ind-1]) / (quantiles[ind] - quantiles[ind-1]);
            return values[ind-1] + (values[ind] - values[ind-1]) * rat;
        }
    }
    return values[values.size()-1];

}

template <typename T>
double quantile(double q, std::vector<T> values, std::vector<int> weights)
{
    std::vector<double> weights_double (weights.begin(), weights.end());
    return quantile(q, values, weights_double);
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> vals {5, 15, 25, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75, 85, 95};
    std::cout << "quantile(0, vals)=" << quantile(0, vals) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "quantile(.73, vals)=" << quantile(.73, vals) << std::endl;

    std::vector<int> vals2 {1, 2, 3};
    std::vector<double> ws2 {1, 2, 3};
    std::cout << "quantile(.13, vals2, ws2)=" << quantile(.13, vals2, ws2) << std::endl;
}

Output

quantile(0, vals)=5
quantile(.73, vals)=73
quantile(.13, vals2, ws2)=1.18667

About weighted quantiles

While in the unweighted case, the input values form an equidistant distribution

values: [1, 2, 3] -> positions: [1/6, 3/6, 5/6]

in the weighted case, the distance is modified.

values: [1, 2, 3], weights: [1, 2, 1] -> positions: [1/8, 4/8, 7/8]

This is not equivalent to a repetition of values for the unweighted case

values: [1, 2, 2, 3] -> positions: [1/8, 3/8, 5/8, 7/8],

as a plateau is formed in between the repeated values. This means:

quantile(q=3/8, values=[1, 2, 2, 3]) = 2

but

quantile(q=3/8, values=[1, 2, 3], weights=[1, 2, 1]) = 1.67

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