18

I need to represent collection in the template and wrap every four elements in the

<li></li>

The template should be like this:

<ul>
    <li>
         <a></a>
         <a></a>
         <a></a>
         <a></a>
    </li>
    <li>
         <a></a>
         <a></a>
         <a></a>
         <a></a>
    </li>
    <li>
         <a></a>
         <a></a>
         <a></a>
         <a></a>
    </li>
</ul>

So i need to do it in the {% for %}

{% for obj in objects %}
 {#add at 1th and every 4th element li wrap somehow#}
    <a>{{object}}</a>
 {# the same closing tag li#}
{% endfor %}

5 Answers 5

62

The following should solve your problem, using built-in template tags :

<ul>
    <li>
    {% for obj in objects %}
        <a>{{ obj }}</a>

    {# if the the forloop counter is divisible by 4, close the <li> tag and open a new one #}
    {% if forloop.counter|divisibleby:4 %}
    </li>
    <li>
    {% endif %}

    {% endfor %}
    </li>
</ul>
2
  • 2
    I really dislike this procedural way of injecting closing tags when a condition is fulfilled. See response stackoverflow.com/a/11965885/636626 for a much more readable and reusable solution. Mar 2, 2016 at 11:47
  • 1
    @NilsWerner: Depends on whether the solution is applicable to the use case or not. If Hedde's solution requires you to modify a lot of existing code and/or infrastructure, it might be more feasable to still go for the "easier route" of dealing with a flat list compared to a generator object. Also, responsibility of how many items the list is grouped by has been transferred to the caller. Whether this is the desired way or not depends on the use-case. That being said, I agree that it is desirable to strive for cleaner templates and reusable solutions.
    – Manuzor
    Mar 13, 2016 at 16:04
18

You can use the divisibleby tag as mentioned before, but for template clearing purposes I usually prefer a helper function that returns a generator:

def grouped(l, n):
    for i in xrange(0, len(l), n):
        yield l[i:i+n]

example simplistic view:

from app.helpers import grouped

def foo(request):
    context['object_list'] = grouped(Bar.objects.all(), 4)
    return render_to_response('index.html', context)

example template:

{% for group in object_list %}
   <ul>
        {% for object in group %}
            <li>{{ object }}</li>
        {% endfor %}
   </ul>
{% endfor %}
3
  • Just brilliant! This is the simplest, cleanest and most readable solution by far. +1 Sep 11, 2015 at 2:33
  • Thanks this is brilliant
    – Cody
    Feb 27, 2017 at 16:58
  • @Hedde van der Heide Beautiful solution! I would suggest maybe to switch xrange with range.
    – adhg
    Nov 6, 2019 at 17:00
3

you can use divisibleby built-in filter, here is link to django documentation

so something like this would work

{% if value|divisibleby 4 %}
#your conditional code
{% endif %}
2

if you want to work it with checking first forloop and last forloop you could use this :

<ul>
{% for obj in objects %}
{% if forloop.first %}
    <li>
{% endif %}
        <a>{{obj}}</a>
{% if forloop.counter|divisibleby:4 and not forloop.first %}
    </li>
    <li>
{% endif %}
{% if forloop.last %}
    </li>
{% endif %}
{% endfor %}
</ul>
1

I personally would consider to separate the elements in the view before passing them to the template and then using nested for loops. Except this you really only have the filter or templatetag option as Vaibhav Mishra mentioned.

3
  • If those 4 objects don't actually belong together in the first place, your approach would couple the logic tighter to the visual representation. Designers and Programmers should be able to work separately, this is one of django's goals afterall.
    – Manuzor
    Aug 15, 2012 at 7:01
  • 1
    Frameworks, like Django are meant to bend to one's needs, if the need is to group objects imo, it's perfectly fine to do this within the view layer. Certainly if it makes the designer's life easier. E.g. sorting is also done outside the template layer, usually. Aug 15, 2012 at 8:18
  • @Hedde I agree with, partially. It might be possible though that you actually can't group these objects by something they have in common as fixed set of 4 (e.g. a plain list of names). The designer might just aim for a more compact representation of the data to the user. However, if the data must be grouped together at all times because they belong together (say, the array looks like [name0, surname0, address0, phone0, name1, .., nameN, ..]) then, indeed this should be done in the view layer. At least this is how I understand the separation of the view (programmer) and template (designer).
    – Manuzor
    Aug 15, 2012 at 11:30

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