1

I have a text file which consists of different lines it looks like

Destination|203.190.242.69|reached|203.190.244.6
Destination|208.109.249.198|reached|212.142.1.1
Destination|94.75.253.170|reached|85.17.100.90
Destination|212.112.234.228|reached|4.69.143.210
Destination|80.146.246.42|reached|192.168.1.1
Destination|122.209.193.217|reached|59.128.3.65
Destination|66.77.197.179|reached|66.77.197.251
Destination|195.254.227.65|reached|213.21.128.141
Destination|125.208.8.253|reached|125.208.15.254

I need to save both the IPs and save them in different arrays. So there will be two arrays, one Destination and one reached. How can I do this. At the moment I have written a code to detect the IP but that does not seem to work.

while (my $line = <$in>) {
    my $traceroute;
    if ($line =~ /(^Destination)/) {
        print "DUDE\n";
        my $ip = $line =~ /(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)$/s;
        #$traceroute = $2;
        print "$ip\n";
    }
}
  • 1
    What is the algorithmic significance of printing "DUDE"? :) – DVK Aug 15 '12 at 9:27
  • 2
    Haha just to check if my program is reaching there :p – user1581917 Aug 15 '12 at 10:04
2

This should do the trick:

while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    if($line =~ /(^Destination)/){
        my($dest, $reach) = $line =~ /(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)/g;
        print "$dest $reach\n";
    }
}

__DATA__
Destination|203.190.242.69|reached|203.190.244.6
Destination|208.109.249.198|reached|212.142.1.1
Destination|94.75.253.170|reached|85.17.100.90
Destination|212.112.234.228|reached|4.69.143.210
Destination|80.146.246.42|reached|192.168.1.1
Destination|122.209.193.217|reached|59.128.3.65
Destination|66.77.197.179|reached|66.77.197.251
Destination|195.254.227.65|reached|213.21.128.141
Destination|125.208.8.253|reached|125.208.15.254

Performing a regex in scalar context, just returns the number of successful matches or 0 if it fails. Assigning the result of a RegEx to an array or a list of variables puts it in list context, in which the RegEx returns the captured values. The /g modifier matches the RegEx not only once, but as often, as it fits in the string. Read perldoc perlretut for more

  • 1
    that is not what you asked. if you need help with some other problem, then i suggest you post a new question. – tauli Aug 15 '12 at 10:17
  • So how can i put the above in an array if i just do my($dest, $reach) = $line=~ /(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)/g; and then push(@destination, $dest); push(@reached, $reach); Should this work? – user1581917 Aug 15 '12 at 10:35
  • I have written the following but it does not seem to work - any ideas while (my $line = <$in>) { if($line =~ /(^Destination)/){ my($dest, $reach) = $line =~ /(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)/g; push(@destination, $dest); push(@reached, $reach); } } } – user1581917 Aug 15 '12 at 12:34
2

Since you want to save the addresses in arrays, and none of the previous solutions explicitly does that, I'm posting another answer:

use strict;

my (@destination, @reached);
foreach my $line (<DATA>) {
    chomp $line;
    my @fields = split '\|', $line;
    push @destination, $fields[1];
    push @reached, $fields[3];
}

use Data::Dumper;
print "Destinations:\n".Dumper(@destination);
print "Reached:\n".Dumper(@reached);

__DATA__
Destination|203.190.242.69|reached|203.190.244.6
Destination|208.109.249.198|reached|212.142.1.1
Destination|94.75.253.170|reached|85.17.100.90
Destination|212.112.234.228|reached|4.69.143.210
Destination|80.146.246.42|reached|192.168.1.1
Destination|122.209.193.217|reached|59.128.3.65
Destination|66.77.197.179|reached|66.77.197.251
Destination|195.254.227.65|reached|213.21.128.141
Destination|125.208.8.253|reached|125.208.15.254
  • I'm sorry my question was like how can i compare the two IPs and see if the first three octet were similar, e.g. in the first line of data first two octets were similar – user1581917 Aug 15 '12 at 10:07
1

Split on the separator and save the items at indices 1 and 3.

perl -aF'\|' -lne 'next unless $F[0] eq "Destination"; print "$F[1]|$F[3]"' input >output

You may want a different output format and/or do something more, of course.

0
while (my $line = <$in>) {
    chomp $line;
    if ($line =~ /^Destination\|(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)\|reached\|(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)$/) {
        my ($d, $r) = ($1,$2);
        print "$d => $r\n";
    }
}
  • 1
    You need to escape the pipe character: \| – Toto Aug 15 '12 at 11:38

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