73

I'm working with an alert window (Telerik WPF) that is normally displayed asynchronously ( code continues running while it is open) and I want to make it synchronous by using async/await.

I have this working with TaskCompletionSource but that class is generic and returns an object like Task<bool> when all I want is a plain Task with no return value.

public Task<bool> ShowAlert(object message, string windowTitle)
{
    var dialogParameters = new DialogParameters { Content = message };

    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
    dialogParameters.Closed += (s, e) => tcs.TrySetResult(true);

    RadWindow.Alert(dialogParameters);

    return tcs.Task;
}

The code that calls that method is

await MessageBoxService.ShowAlert("The alert text.")

How can I return a non-generic Task that functions similarly which I can await until the dialogParameters.Closed event fires? I understand that I could just ignore the bool that is being returned in this code. I am looking for a different solution than that.

97

The method can be changed to:

public Task ShowAlert(object message, string windowTitle)

Task<bool> inherits from Task so you can return Task<bool> while only exposing Task to the caller

Edit:

I found a Microsoft document, http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=19957, by Stephen Toub titled 'The Task-based Asynchronous pattern' and it has the following excerpt that recommends this same pattern.

There is no non-generic counterpart to TaskCompletionSource<TResult>. However, Task<TResult> derives from Task, and thus the generic TaskCompletionSource<TResult> can be used for I/O-bound methods that simply return a Task by utilizing a source with a dummy TResult (Boolean is a good default choice, and if a developer is concerned about a consumer of the Task downcasting it to a Task<TResult>, a private TResult type may be used)

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  • 29
    If only void was accepted as a type parameter you wouldn't need to do these contortions. – MgSam Mar 13 '14 at 15:32
  • 4
    The benefit of object over bool (as in Stephen's answer) is that bool might imply there is a meaning. – Matthijs Wessels Nov 2 '14 at 15:56
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    Consider TaskCompletionSource<System.Reactive.Unit> to make this clearer to the reader. – RichB Dec 18 '14 at 10:35
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    @RichB Interesting. I've not seen that class before which makes me wonder, is it really clearer if I and the next guy don't know what it means? <wink> Good suggestion though. – Kevin Kalitowski Dec 18 '14 at 15:53
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    Scala: scala-lang.org/api/current/index.html#scala.Unit F#: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd483472.aspx Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_type I think it's clearer than a superfluous bool or object even if it causes the reader to read the above docs. – RichB Dec 18 '14 at 19:54
52

If you don't want to leak information, the common approach is to use TaskCompletionSource<object> and complete with a result of null. Then just return it as a Task.

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  • Unfortunately u can't make SetCancel/SetException without knowing generic type parameter T. Seems a big design mistake. – Grigory Jul 3 '14 at 22:41
  • @Grigory: are you shure? As of today, I can use SetException without any problems. – Sebastian Sep 3 '15 at 9:10
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    @Sebastian: The non-generic Task.FromException was added in .NET 4.6. – Stephen Cleary Sep 3 '15 at 12:46
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    Agreed. This seems like a big design mistake. – Christian Findlay Aug 22 '16 at 4:43
5

.NET 5 has a non-generic TaskCompletionSource.

It was added in this pull request: https://github.com/dotnet/runtime/pull/37452/files#diff-4a72dcb26e2d643c337baef9f64312f3

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3

Nito.AsyncEx implements a non-generic TaskCompletionSource class, credit to Mr @StephenCleary above.

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  • I just downloaded this repo and grabbed the TaskCompletionSource class from there. It makes sense, but it's still the same issue. Even though it does return a Task, you can't mark your methods with the async keyword so you can't even use the await keyword. – Christian Findlay Aug 22 '16 at 4:49
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    @MelbourneDeveloper you're talking about something different than the original poster. TaskCompletionSource is used to provide an async interface for sync code with events and such. You can await a TaskCompletionSource.Task fine so not sure what the problem is? – georgiosd Aug 30 '16 at 12:13
  • FYI, the non-generic version of TaskCompletionSource was removed in v5 of the AsyncEx library: github.com/StephenCleary/AsyncEx/issues/176 – mark.monteiro Oct 13 at 15:09
1

From @Kevin Kalitowski

I found a Microsoft document, http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=19957, by Stephen Toub titled 'The Task-based Asynchronous pattern'

There is an example in this document which I think deals with the issue as Kevin points out. This is the example:

public static Task Delay(int millisecondsTimeout)
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
    new Timer(self =>
    {
        ((IDisposable)self).Dispose();
        tcs.TrySetResult(true);
    }).Change(millisecondsTimeout, -1);
    return tcs.Task;
}

At first I thought it was not good because you can't directly add the "async" modifier to the method without a compilation message. But, if you change the method slightly, the method will compile with async/await:

public async static Task Delay(int millisecondsTimeout)
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
    new Timer(self =>
    {
        ((IDisposable)self).Dispose();
        tcs.TrySetResult(true);
    }).Change(millisecondsTimeout, -1);
    await tcs.Task;
}

Edit: at first I thought I'd gotten over the hump. But, when I ran the equivalent code in my app, this code just makes the app hang when it gets to await tcs.Task;. So, I still believe that this is a serious design flaw in the async/await c# syntax.

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  • Your code sample works for me. Can't really post code in a comment but I did the following and awaited GoAsync(): private static async Task GoAsync() { Console.WriteLine($"Starting await at: {DateTime.Now.ToLongTimeString()}"); await Delay(3000); Console.WriteLine($"Got past await at: {DateTime.Now.ToLongTimeString()}"); } – Kevin Kalitowski Aug 23 '16 at 12:55
  • My guess is your app hangs due to a deadlock: both the Timer and await "run" on the same thread, thus the Timer never gets a chance to set the result and await can never complete. Try await tcs.Task.ConfigureAwait(false) instead. – enzi Apr 28 '17 at 13:10
  • Check out the RunContinuationsAsynchronously option. – Theodor Zoulias Jul 3 at 18:40

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