In chapter 17 of JLS, it introduce a concept: happens-before consistent.

A set of actions A is happens-before consistent if for all reads r in A, where W(r) is the write action seen by r, it is not the case that either hb(r, W(r)) or that there exists a write w in A such that w.v = r.v and hb(W(r), w) and hb(w, r)"

In my understanding, it equals to following words: ..., it is the case that neither ... nor ...

So my first two questions are:

  • is my understanding right?
  • what does "w.v = r.v" mean?

It also gives an Example: 17.4.5-1

Thread 1 Thread 2

B = 1; A = 2; 

r2 = A; r1 = B; 

In first execution order:

1: B = 1;

3: A = 2;

2: r2 = A;  // sees initial write of 0

4: r1 = B;  // sees initial write of 0

The order itself has already told us that two threads are executed alternately, so my third question is: what does left number mean?

In my understanding, the reason of both r2 and r1 can see initial write of 0 is both A and B are not volatile field. So my fourth quesiton is: whether my understanding is right?

In second execution order:

1: r2 = A;  // sees write of A = 2

3: r1 = B;  // sees write of B = 1

2: B = 1;

4: A = 2;

According to definition of happens-before consistency, it is not difficult to understand this execution order is happens-before consistent(if my first understanding is correct). So my fifth and sixth questions are: does it exist this situation (reads see writes that occur later) in real world? If it does, could you give me a real example?

  • I need a clarification on the example... If for both threads the assignment is before the read, there is at least one value changed before they reach the reading. How can both threads see 0? – treaz Apr 27 '13 at 9:16
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Each thread can be on a different core with its own cache. This means that one thread can write to a value storing in a register, or its local cache, and this value is not visible to another thread for some time. (milli-seconds is not uncommon)

A more extreme example is that the reading thread's code is optimised with the assumption that since it never changes the value, it doesn't need to read it from memory. In this case the optimised code never sees the change performed by another thread.

In both cases, the use of volatile ensures that reads and write occur in a consistent order and both threads see the same value. This is sometimes described as always reading from main memory, though it doesn't have to be the case because the caches can talk to each other directly. (So the performance hit is much smaller than you might expect)

  • Thanks a lot about your answer. – newman Aug 16 '12 at 8:57
  • Thanks a lot about your answer. May I consider that all my two understanding are correct? And still two questions: what does "w.v = r.v" mean? what does left number mean? Thanks again. – newman Aug 16 '12 at 9:09
  • According to my understanding, I find that if a program is correctly synchronized then it still allows data race existed in program. So what is your opinion about this opinion? – newman Aug 16 '12 at 14:54
  • I have start a new question: Does a correctly synchronized program still allow data race?(Part I) to continue this discussion. You are welcome to join new question. – newman Aug 17 '12 at 13:30
  • synchronized ensures all memory at the entry and exit of a the block occurs in a predictable order, even things you didn§t access in the block. synchronized components allow different race conditions e.g. a Vector or Collections.syncrhonizedList accessed multiple times can have race condition between a read and a write to that collection. – Peter Lawrey Aug 17 '12 at 19:34

The Java Memory Model defines a partial ordering of all your actions of your program which is called happens-before.
To guarantee that a thread Y is able to see the side-effects of action X (irrelevant if X occurred in different thread or not) a happens-before relationship is defined between X and Y.
If such a relationship is not present the JVM may re-order the operations of the program.
Now, if a variable is shared and accessed by many threads, and written by (at least) one thread if the reads and writes are not ordered by the happens before relationship, then you have a data race.
In a correct program there are no data races.
Example is 2 threads A and B synchronized on lock X.
Thread A acquires lock (now Thread B is blocked) and does the write operations and then releases lock X. Now Thread B acquires lock X and since all the actions of Thread A were done before releasing the lock X, they are ordered before the actions of Thread B which acquired the lock X after thread A (and also visible to Thread B).
Note that this occurs on actions synchronized on the same lock. There is no happens before relationship among threads synchronized on different locks

  • Thanks a lot about your answer. May I consider that all my two understanding are correct? And still two questions: what does "w.v = r.v" mean? what does left number mean? Thanks again. – newman Aug 16 '12 at 9:11
  • 1
    @newman:r.v means: read of a variable v and and w.v means: write to variable v.It is explained in the same paragraph: We say that a read r of a variable v is allowed to observe a write w to v if, in the happens-before partial order of the execution trace – Cratylus Aug 16 '12 at 9:50
  • @newman You might be interested in this discussion which shows how you can use that paragraph to prove a concurrent code correct (i.e. free of data race). – assylias Aug 16 '12 at 10:25
  • Thanks a lot for all your reply. I have understood what means w.v and r.v, but what means w.v = r.v, in other words, what does "=" mean? I think it does not mean "equals" because "equals" is "==". So would you please explain one step more. – newman Aug 16 '12 at 14:14
  • @newman It means that the read and the write are about the same variable - it does not say anything about the value of the variable written / seen by w / r. – assylias Aug 16 '12 at 14:58

In substance that is correct. The main thing to take out of this is: unless you use some form of synchronization, there is no guarantee that a read that comes after a write in your program order sees the effect of that write, as the statements might have been reodered.

does it exist this situation (reads see writes that occur later) in real world? If it does, could you give me a real example?

From a wall clock's perspective, obviously, a read can't see the effect of a write that has not happened yet.

From a program order's perspective, because statements can be reordered if there isn't a proper synchronization (happens before relationship), a read that comes before a write in your program, could see the effect of that write during execution because it has been executed after the write by the JVM.

  • Thanks a lot about your answer. May I consider that all my two understanding are correct? And still two questions: what does "w.v = r.v" mean? what does left number mean? Thanks again. – newman Aug 16 '12 at 9:10
  • According to my understanding, I find that if a program is correctly synchronized then it still allows data race existed in program. So what is your opinion about this opinion? – newman Aug 16 '12 at 14:55
  • @newman I am not sure => I prefer to keep it simple and avoid data races. – assylias Aug 16 '12 at 15:05
  • Thanks a lot. I will continue this topic tomorrow. See you next day. – newman Aug 16 '12 at 15:40
  • There are two conclusions from JLS: C1:If a program has no data races, then all executions of the program will appear to be sequentially consistent. C2:If a program is correctly synchronized, then all executions of the program will appear to be sequentially consistent. If another direction of C1 is true,then we get following conclusion: C3:If a program is correctly synchronized,then this problem has no data race. But unfortunately,there is not such a direction in JLS, so I get the that conclusion: – newman Aug 17 '12 at 12:42

It means if there is no synchronization mechanism in place, you may see the impact counter intuitively.

volatile int A = 0;
volatile int B = 0;
1: B = 1;
2: r2 = A; // r2 guarantees the value 1
3: A = 2;         
4: r1 = B; // r1 guarantees the value 2

This is because volatile variables guarantees happens before relation. If A, and B are not volatile system can reorder the evaluation of variables and it may become counter intuitive.

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