This is a self Q&A of a handy piece of code I came up with.

Currently, there isn't an easy way to embed an SVG image and then have access to the SVG elements via CSS. There are various methods of using JS SVG frameworks, but they are overly complicated if all you are doing is making a simple icon with a rollover state.

So here is what I came up with, which I think is by far the easiest way to use SVG files on a website. It takes its concept from the early text-to-image replacement methods, but as far as I am aware has never been done for SVGs.

This is the question:

How do I embed an SVG and change its color in CSS without using a JS-SVG framework?

  • 1
    Unfortunately the img tag doesn't work with svg files in IE, so keep in mind that. IE recognize embed tags. Anyway, nice job! – user1973469 Apr 26 '13 at 17:50
  • 2
    For svg, you should use the "fill" css property. For images it's appropriate to use "filter". "Filter" does in fact work for both but it is unnecessary to do all of that work for a vector graphic. – Samy Bencherif Sep 15 '16 at 3:58

17 Answers 17

up vote 510 down vote accepted

Firstly, use an IMG tag in your HTML to embed an SVG graphic. I used Adobe Illustrator to make the graphic.

<img id="facebook-logo" class="svg social-link" src="/images/logo-facebook.svg"/>

This is just like how you'd embed a normal image. Note that you need to set the IMG to have a class of svg. The 'social-link' class is just for examples sake. The ID is not required, but is useful.

Then use this jQuery code (in a separate file or inline in the HEAD).

    /*
     * Replace all SVG images with inline SVG
     */
        jQuery('img.svg').each(function(){
            var $img = jQuery(this);
            var imgID = $img.attr('id');
            var imgClass = $img.attr('class');
            var imgURL = $img.attr('src');

            jQuery.get(imgURL, function(data) {
                // Get the SVG tag, ignore the rest
                var $svg = jQuery(data).find('svg');

                // Add replaced image's ID to the new SVG
                if(typeof imgID !== 'undefined') {
                    $svg = $svg.attr('id', imgID);
                }
                // Add replaced image's classes to the new SVG
                if(typeof imgClass !== 'undefined') {
                    $svg = $svg.attr('class', imgClass+' replaced-svg');
                }

                // Remove any invalid XML tags as per http://validator.w3.org
                $svg = $svg.removeAttr('xmlns:a');

                // Replace image with new SVG
                $img.replaceWith($svg);

            }, 'xml');

        });

What the above code does is look for all IMG's with the class 'svg' and replace it with the inline SVG from the linked file. The massive advantage is that it allows you to use CSS to change the color of the SVG now, like so:

svg:hover path {
    fill: red;
}

The jQuery code I wrote also ports across the original images ID and classes. So this CSS works too:

#facebook-logo:hover path {
    fill: red;
}

Or:

.social-link:hover path {
    fill: red;
}

You can see an example of it working here: http://labs.funkhausdesign.com/examples/img-svg/img-to-svg.html

We have a more complicated version that includes caching here: https://github.com/funkhaus/style-guide/blob/master/template/js/site.js#L32-L90

  • 6
    It may sometimes not work in Safari (for e.g.), to ensure returned data is readable, remplace the }); of $.get with }, 'xml'); – Joan Jul 24 '13 at 10:28
  • 27
    You could probably even replace the selector with img[src$=".svg"] and eliminate the need for the svg class. – Casey Chu Aug 4 '13 at 23:40
  • 2
    @LeonGaban I don't think there is a way to target the fill of a background image. It would be super helpful if you could though! – Drew Baker Oct 29 '13 at 16:47
  • 3
    A bit late, @LeonGaban, but a better way to do it probably would be to remove the fill attribute altogether, and rely on a CSS file to add a fill to the parent svg. $('#ico_company path').removeAttr('fill'). Then you could do #ico_company { fill: #ccc } in your CSS file – bioball May 16 '14 at 18:56
  • 4
    I wish browsers would solve this issue. Editing svg with css is a common use case – light24bulbs Dec 25 '14 at 19:07

Style

svg path {
    fill: #000;
}

Script

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('img[src$=".svg"]').each(function() {
        var $img = jQuery(this);
        var imgURL = $img.attr('src');
        var attributes = $img.prop("attributes");

        $.get(imgURL, function(data) {
            // Get the SVG tag, ignore the rest
            var $svg = jQuery(data).find('svg');

            // Remove any invalid XML tags
            $svg = $svg.removeAttr('xmlns:a');

            // Loop through IMG attributes and apply on SVG
            $.each(attributes, function() {
                $svg.attr(this.name, this.value);
            });

            // Replace IMG with SVG
            $img.replaceWith($svg);
        }, 'xml');
    });
});
  • 3
    This is a good optimization! – Drew Baker Feb 23 '16 at 23:30
  • 5
    For some reason this answer worked whereas the accepted one didn't. – samvermette Aug 14 '16 at 21:32
  • 1
    If you don't have a width attr, it just creates one with a wrong number. width="170.667" in my case – stallingOne May 29 '17 at 10:10
  • 2
    This isnt perfect since it loses the previous img dimensions. – RichieHH Jun 17 '17 at 11:35
  • Hello suppose i have different svg with differnet color each. Using this method, all my svg colors become the same as the first svg that is being looped. Any idea how can I maneuver around this so each color stays the same as before? – tnkh Nov 24 '17 at 10:16

If you can include files (PHP include or include via your CMS of choice) in your page, you can add the SVG code and include it into your page. This works the same as pasting the SVG source into the page, but makes the page markup cleaner.

The benefit is that you can target parts of your SVG via CSS for hover -- no javascript required.

http://codepen.io/chriscoyier/pen/evcBu

You just have to use a CSS rule like this:

#pathidorclass:hover { fill: #303 !important; }

Note that the !important bit is necessary to override the fill color.

  • 3
    For those using AngularJS: <div ng-include="'svg.svg'"></div> – Mikel Feb 24 '16 at 16:22
  • Not a very elegant solution storing svg data in a database though. Not wrong, but pumping out xml/html/svg DOM data from an API or CMS rather than using templates or other assets just feels wrong. – ChristoKiwi Aug 17 '17 at 5:00
  • Thank you for this contribution ... The most advanced sites today nest svg data to allow for all kinds of activity, without this answer I would not have guessed that ! – webMan Oct 23 '17 at 7:14
  • Additionally, if your SVG has transparent areas, these won't count as hovering and you may experience "flashy hover". To fix that, just add a wrapper element (an <a>, if it's convenient) and then add that to the CSS rule. #pathidorclass:hover, .wrapperclass:hover #pathidorclass { fill: green; } Or even just eliminate the original hover of the SVG path since you are targeting it via the wrapper element now anyway. – Neil Monroe Feb 14 at 16:21

Alternatively you could use CSS mask, granted browser support isn't good but you could use a fallback

.frame {
    background: blue;
    -webkit-mask: url(image.svg) center / contain no-repeat;
}
  • 11
    MDN specifies that -webkit-mask should not be used on any production website. – vaindil Mar 7 '16 at 22:20
  • 1
    Doesnt work in firefox. – Jyotirmoy Pan May 6 '16 at 20:22
  • 1
    doesn't color the svg – vishal Mar 15 '17 at 13:03

You can now use the CSS filter property in most modern browsers (including Edge, but not IE11). It works on SVG images as well as other elements. You can use hue-rotate or invert to modify colors, although they don't let you modify different colors independently. I use the following CSS class to show a "disabled" version of an icon (where the original is an SVG picture with saturated color):

.disabled {
    opacity: 0.4;
    filter: grayscale(100%);
    -webkit-filter: grayscale(100%);
}

This makes it light grey in most browsers. In IE (and probably Opera Mini, which I haven't tested) it is noticeably faded by the opacity property, which still looks pretty good, although it's not grey.

Here's an example with four different CSS classes for the Twemoji bell icon: original (yellow), the above "disabled" class, hue-rotate (green), and invert (blue).

.twa-bell {
  background-image: url("https://twemoji.maxcdn.com/svg/1f514.svg");
  display: inline-block;
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
  background-position: center center;
  height: 3em;
  width: 3em;
  margin: 0 0.15em 0 0.3em;
  vertical-align: -0.3em;
  background-size: 3em 3em;
}
.grey-out {
  opacity: 0.4;
  filter: grayscale(100%);
  -webkit-filter: grayscale(100%);
}
.hue-rotate {
  filter: hue-rotate(90deg);
  -webkit-filter: hue-rotate(90deg);
}
.invert {
  filter: invert(100%);
  -webkit-filter: invert(100%);
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>

<head>
</head>

<body>
  <span class="twa-bell"></span>
  <span class="twa-bell grey-out"></span>
  <span class="twa-bell hue-rotate"></span>
  <span class="twa-bell invert"></span>
</body>

</html>

  • Just noticed that invert is good solution if you don't want to create icon fonts. I used this jQuery code to change icon in my website's header according to css color property (notice that I am using white png icons): if ($('.w3-top img').css("color") == "rgb(0, 0, 0)") { $('.w3-top img').css("filter", "invert(100%)"); $('.w3-top img').css("-webkit-filter", "invert(100%)"); }; – SpookClover Apr 15 '17 at 11:23
  • .invert worked fine for me with black svg. thanks – Meloman Jul 4 '17 at 8:59
  • This one is exactly what I want. Thanks! – Nicolas S.Xu May 17 at 18:52
  • Great approach. Edited my SVG xml to add the target icon color then used an .icon-disabled class to gray it out. – SushiGuy Jun 16 at 0:20

@Drew Baker gave a great solution to solve the problem. The code works properly. However, those who uses AngularJs may find lots of dependency on jQuery. Consequently, I thought it is a good idea to paste for AngularJS users, a code following @Drew Baker's solution.

AngularJs way of the same code

1. Html: use the bellow tag in you html file:

<svg-image src="/icons/my.svg" class="any-class-you-wish"></svg-image>

2. Directive: this will be the directive that you will need to recognise the tag:

'use strict';
angular.module('myApp')
  .directive('svgImage', ['$http', function($http) {
    return {
      restrict: 'E',
      link: function(scope, element) {
        var imgURL = element.attr('src');
        // if you want to use ng-include, then
        // instead of the above line write the bellow:
        // var imgURL = element.attr('ng-include');
        var request = $http.get(
          imgURL,
          {'Content-Type': 'application/xml'}
        );

        scope.manipulateImgNode = function(data, elem){
          var $svg = angular.element(data)[4];
          var imgClass = elem.attr('class');
          if(typeof(imgClass) !== 'undefined') {
            var classes = imgClass.split(' ');
            for(var i = 0; i < classes.length; ++i){
              $svg.classList.add(classes[i]);
            }
          }
          $svg.removeAttribute('xmlns:a');
          return $svg;
        };

        request.success(function(data){
          element.replaceWith(scope.manipulateImgNode(data, element));
        });
      }
    };
  }]);

3. CSS:

.any-class-you-wish{
    border: 1px solid red;
    height: 300px;
    width:  120px
}

4. Unit-test with karma-jasmine:

'use strict';

describe('Directive: svgImage', function() {

  var $rootScope, $compile, element, scope, $httpBackend, apiUrl, data;

  beforeEach(function() {
    module('myApp');

    inject(function($injector) {
      $rootScope = $injector.get('$rootScope');
      $compile = $injector.get('$compile');
      $httpBackend = $injector.get('$httpBackend');
      apiUrl = $injector.get('apiUrl');
    });

    scope = $rootScope.$new();
    element = angular.element('<svg-image src="/icons/icon-man.svg" class="svg"></svg-image>');
    element = $compile(element)(scope);

    spyOn(scope, 'manipulateImgNode').andCallThrough();
    $httpBackend.whenGET(apiUrl + 'me').respond(200, {});

    data = '<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>' +
      '<!-- Generator: Adobe Illustrator 17.0.0, SVG Export Plug-In . SVG Version: 6.00 Build 0)  -->' +
      '<!DOCTYPE svg PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD SVG 1.1//EN" "http://www.w3.org/Graphics/SVG/1.1/DTD/svg11.dtd">' +
      '<!-- Obj -->' +
      '<!-- Obj -->' +
      '<svg version="1.1" id="Capa_1" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" x="0px" y="0px"' +
      'width="64px" height="64px" viewBox="0 0 64 64" enable-background="new 0 0 64 64" xml:space="preserve">' +
        '<g>' +
          '<path fill="#F4A902" d=""/>' +
          '<path fill="#F4A902" d=""/>' +
        '</g>' +
      '</svg>';
    $httpBackend.expectGET('/icons/icon-man.svg').respond(200, data);
  });

  afterEach(function() {
    $httpBackend.verifyNoOutstandingExpectation();
    $httpBackend.verifyNoOutstandingRequest();
  });

  it('should call manipulateImgNode atleast once', function () {
    $httpBackend.flush();
    expect(scope.manipulateImgNode.callCount).toBe(1);
  });

  it('should return correct result', function () {
    $httpBackend.flush();
    var result = scope.manipulateImgNode(data, element);
    expect(result).toBeDefined();
  });

  it('should define classes', function () {
    $httpBackend.flush();
    var result = scope.manipulateImgNode(data, element);
    var classList = ["svg"];
    expect(result.classList[0]).toBe(classList[0]);
  });
});
  • 1
    your solution does not work, could be <div ng-include="/icons/my.svg" class="any-class-you-wish"></div> – Guillaume Vincent Feb 22 '15 at 11:18
  • @guillaumevincent if you want to use it with ng-include then just change this line var imgURL = element.attr('src'); to var imgURL = element.attr('ng-include'); – Max Feb 23 '15 at 8:15
  • This is a very handy solution, but be careful in overusing it as it can hit performance pretty hard - I.E. a set of 5 sharing icons repeated on an article listing or something like that. – greedz Mar 11 '15 at 15:24
  • 1
    There is a problem with your code in IE. You can use just if (typeof(imgClass) !== 'undefined') { $svg.setAttribute("class", imgClass); } instead of split and for loop. – Robert Bokori Jun 18 '15 at 21:02
  • 2
    Awesome work! But for certain image you need to grab the first element of the svg (angular.element(data)[0];) and to make it work with IE use if ($svg.getAttribute('class')) { $svg.setAttribute('class', $svg.getAttribute('class') + ' ' + imgClass); } else { $svg.setAttribute('class', imgClass); }. Also you might want to add cache: true to the options of $http.get otherwise your page might become very slow. – leo Mar 7 '16 at 13:32

I realize you're wanting to accomplish this with CSS, but just a reminder in case it's a small, simple image - you can always pop it open in Notepad++ and change the path/whateverelement's fill:

<path style="fill:#010002;" d="M394.854,205.444c9.218-15.461,19.102-30.181,14.258-49.527
    ...
    C412.843,226.163,402.511,211.451,394.854,205.444z"/>

It could save a ton of ugly script. Sorry if it's off-base, but sometimes the simple solutions can be overlooked.

...even swapping multiple svg images might be smaller in size than some of the code snippets for this question.

  • awesome!!! - exactly what i was looking for: easy, plain, neat and works like a charm! – DJCrashdummy May 2 at 10:21

I wrote a directive to solve this issue with AngularJS. It is available here - ngReusableSvg.

It replaces the SVG element after it's been rendered, and places it inside a div element, making its CSS easily changeable. This helps using the same SVG file in different places using different sizes/colors.

The usage is simple:

<object oa-reusable-svg
        data="my_icon.svg"
        type="image/svg+xml"
        class="svg-class"
        height="30"  // given to prevent UI glitches at switch time
        width="30">
</object>

After that, you can easily have:

.svg-class svg {
    fill: red; // whichever color you want
}
  • Nice one, exactly what I was looking for! – IonicBurger May 16 '16 at 22:11
  • @DjangoBurger Glad it helped :) – Omri Aharon May 17 '16 at 6:56
  • Hi, thanks for providing this solution. I've tried it and it yields: <div ng-click="eventHandler()" ng-class="classEventHandler()" style="height:30px; width:30px;float:left;" class="svg-class" id="my-svg" height="30" width="30">[[object SVGSVGElement]]</div> In the html it then just puts [[object SVGSVGElement]]. Do you know what's the problem? Another question, does it have a large impact on performance or can I use it on many svg's on a page? And lastly, it's still on angular 1.3 (the bower). – bersling Jun 5 '16 at 11:18
  • Which version of angular are you using? Haven't encountered your issue.. maybe it's something with the SVG? Performance-wise the switch is relatively heavy, I've used it myself on like 10 and it was fine.. I guess that depends on amount/size, so trial and experiment with it. What's the problem with the bower? Are you using a different version and there's a conflict? – Omri Aharon Jun 5 '16 at 12:16

Here's a version for knockout.js based on the accepted answer:

Important: It does actually require jQuery too for the replacing, but I thought it may be useful to some.

ko.bindingHandlers.svgConvert =
    {
        'init': function ()
        {
            return { 'controlsDescendantBindings': true };
        },

        'update': function (element, valueAccessor, allBindings, viewModel, bindingContext)
        {
            var $img = $(element);
            var imgID = $img.attr('id');
            var imgClass = $img.attr('class');
            var imgURL = $img.attr('src');

            $.get(imgURL, function (data)
            {
                // Get the SVG tag, ignore the rest
                var $svg = $(data).find('svg');

                // Add replaced image's ID to the new SVG
                if (typeof imgID !== 'undefined')
                {
                    $svg = $svg.attr('id', imgID);
                }
                // Add replaced image's classes to the new SVG
                if (typeof imgClass !== 'undefined')
                {
                    $svg = $svg.attr('class', imgClass + ' replaced-svg');
                }

                // Remove any invalid XML tags as per http://validator.w3.org
                $svg = $svg.removeAttr('xmlns:a');

                // Replace image with new SVG
                $img.replaceWith($svg);

            }, 'xml');

        }
    };

Then just apply data-bind="svgConvert: true" to your img tag.

This solution completely replaces the img tag with a SVG and any additional bindings would not be respected.

  • 2
    This is great! If you want to take it to the next level, we have an updated version that includes caching, so the same SVG isn't requested twice. github.com/funkhaus/style-guide/blob/master/template/js/… – Drew Baker Oct 1 '16 at 18:52
  • I was a bit worried about that but didn't have time to look into it myself. Just needed something quick – Simon_Weaver Oct 1 '16 at 23:28
  • 1
    @DrewBaker actually I was more concerned that the img tag would request the file and then the get would request it again. I considered changing the src to a data-src attribute on the img tag, but concluded that modern browsers are probably smart enough to cache the file anyway – Simon_Weaver Oct 1 '16 at 23:30

Here's a no framework code, only pure js :

document.querySelectorAll('img.svg').forEach(function(element) {
            var imgID = element.getAttribute('id')
            var imgClass = element.getAttribute('class')
            var imgURL = element.getAttribute('src')

            xhr = new XMLHttpRequest()
            xhr.onreadystatechange = function() {
                if(xhr.readyState == 4 && xhr.status == 200) {
                    var svg = xhr.responseXML.getElementsByTagName('svg')[0];

                    if(imgID != null) {
                         svg.setAttribute('id', imgID);
                    }

                    if(imgClass != null) {
                         svg.setAttribute('class', imgClass + ' replaced-svg');
                    }

                    svg.removeAttribute('xmlns:a')

                    if(!svg.hasAttribute('viewBox') && svg.hasAttribute('height') && svg.hasAttribute('width')) {
                        svg.setAttribute('viewBox', '0 0 ' + svg.getAttribute('height') + ' ' + svg.getAttribute('width'))
                    }
                    element.parentElement.replaceChild(svg, element)
                }
            }
            xhr.open('GET', imgURL, true)
            xhr.send(null)
        })

There is an open source library called SVGInject that uses the onload attribute to trigger the injection. You can find the GitHub project at https://github.com/iconfu/svg-inject

Here is a minimal example using SVGInject:

<html>
  <head>
    <script src="svg-inject.min.js"></script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <img src="image.svg" onload="SVGInject(this)" />
  </body>
</html>

After the image is loaded the onload="SVGInject(this) will trigger the injection and the <img> element will be replaced by the contents of the SVG file provided in the src attribute.

It solves several issues with SVG injection:

  1. SVGs can be hidden until injection has finished. This is important if a style is already applied during load time, which would otherwise cause a brief "unstyled content flash".

  2. The <img> elements inject themselved automatically. If you add SVGs dynamically, you don't have to worry about calling the injection function again.

  3. A random string is added to each ID in the SVG to avoid having the same ID multiple times in the document if an SVG is injected more than once.

SVGInject is plain Javascript and works with all browsers that support SVG.

Disclaimer: I am the co-author of SVGInject

If we have a greater number of such svg images we can also take the help of font-files.
Sites like https://glyphter.com/ can get us a font file from our svgs.


E.g.

@font-face {
    font-family: 'iconFont';
    src: url('iconFont.eot');
}
#target{
    color: white;
    font-size:96px;
    font-family:iconFont;
}
  • 5
    I personally hate the "images as a font" technique. It makes it hard to add/edit images, adds a lot of nonsensical markup. Font's should be fonts, images should be images etc. – Drew Baker Jul 7 '15 at 21:47
  • Agreed. You also need to remember/lookup the images assigned to characters. but for the specific case where images are used as icons/button/bullets, act more as text than media, font-files can also be an alternative – Abhishek Borar Jul 9 '15 at 3:17
  • even github don't use font anymore for icon github.com/blog/2112-delivering-octicons-with-svg – gagarine Jun 25 '17 at 18:25

Since SVG is basically code, you need just contents. I used PHP to obtain content, but you can use whatever you want.

<?php
$content    = file_get_contents($pathToSVG);
?>

Then, I've printed content "as is" inside a div container

<div class="fill-class"><?php echo $content;?></div>

To finnaly set rule to container's SVG childs on CSS

.fill-class > svg { 
    fill: orange;
}

I got this results with a material icon SVG:

  1. Mozilla Firefox 59.0.2 (64-bit) Linux

enter image description here

  1. Google Chrome66.0.3359.181 (Build oficial) (64 bits) Linux

enter image description here

  1. Opera 53.0.2907.37 Linux

enter image description here

The selected solution is fine if you want jQuery to process all svg elements in your DOM and your DOM is of reasonable size. But if your DOM is large and you decide to load parts of your DOM dynamically, it really makes no sense to have to rescan the entire DOM just to update svg elements. Instead, use a jQuery plugin to do this:

/**
 * A jQuery plugin that loads an svg file and replaces the jQuery object with its contents.
 *
 * The path to the svg file is specified in the src attribute (which normally does not exist for an svg element).
 *
 * The width, height and class attributes in the loaded svg will be replaced by those that exist in the jQuery object's
 * underlying html. Note: All other attributes in the original element are lost including the style attribute. Place
 * any styles in a style class instead.
 */
(function ($) {
    $.fn.svgLoader = function () {
        var src = $(this).attr("src");
        var width = this.attr("width");
        var height = this.attr("height");
        var cls = this.attr("class");
        var ctx = $(this);

        // Get the svg file and replace the <svg> element.
        $.ajax({
            url: src,
            cache: false
        }).done(function (html) {
            let svg = $(html);
            svg.attr("width", width);
            svg.attr("height", height);
            svg.attr("class", cls);
            var newHtml = $('<a></a>').append(svg.clone()).html();
            ctx.replaceWith(newHtml);
        });

        return this;
    };

}(jQuery));

In your html, specify an svg element as follows:

<svg src="images/someSvgFile.svg" height="45" width="45" class="mySVGClass"/>

And apply the plugin:

$(".mySVGClass").svgLoader();

You can use data-image for that. using data-image(data-URI) you can access SVG like inline.

Here is rollover effect using pure CSS and SVG.

I know it messy but you can do this way.

 .action-btn {
    background-size: 20px 20px;
    background-position: center center;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    border-width: 1px;
    border-style: solid;
    border-radius: 30px;
    height: 40px;
    width: 60px;
    display: inline-block;
 }

.delete {
     background-image: url("data:image/svg+xml;charset=UTF-8,%3csvg version='1.1' id='Capa_1' fill='#FB404B' xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2000/svg' xmlns:xlink='http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink' x='0px' y='0px' width='482.428px' height='482.429px' viewBox='0 0 482.428 482.429' style='enable-background:new 0 0 482.428 482.429;' xml:space='preserve'%3e%3cg%3e%3cg%3e%3cpath d='M381.163,57.799h-75.094C302.323,25.316,274.686,0,241.214,0c-33.471,0-61.104,25.315-64.85,57.799h-75.098 c-30.39,0-55.111,24.728-55.111,55.117v2.828c0,23.223,14.46,43.1,34.83,51.199v260.369c0,30.39,24.724,55.117,55.112,55.117 h210.236c30.389,0,55.111-24.729,55.111-55.117V166.944c20.369-8.1,34.83-27.977,34.83-51.199v-2.828 C436.274,82.527,411.551,57.799,381.163,57.799z M241.214,26.139c19.037,0,34.927,13.645,38.443,31.66h-76.879 C206.293,39.783,222.184,26.139,241.214,26.139z M375.305,427.312c0,15.978-13,28.979-28.973,28.979H136.096 c-15.973,0-28.973-13.002-28.973-28.979V170.861h268.182V427.312z M410.135,115.744c0,15.978-13,28.979-28.973,28.979H101.266 c-15.973,0-28.973-13.001-28.973-28.979v-2.828c0-15.978,13-28.979,28.973-28.979h279.897c15.973,0,28.973,13.001,28.973,28.979 V115.744z'/%3e%3cpath d='M171.144,422.863c7.218,0,13.069-5.853,13.069-13.068V262.641c0-7.216-5.852-13.07-13.069-13.07 c-7.217,0-13.069,5.854-13.069,13.07v147.154C158.074,417.012,163.926,422.863,171.144,422.863z'/%3e%3cpath d='M241.214,422.863c7.218,0,13.07-5.853,13.07-13.068V262.641c0-7.216-5.854-13.07-13.07-13.07 c-7.217,0-13.069,5.854-13.069,13.07v147.154C228.145,417.012,233.996,422.863,241.214,422.863z'/%3e%3cpath d='M311.284,422.863c7.217,0,13.068-5.853,13.068-13.068V262.641c0-7.216-5.852-13.07-13.068-13.07 c-7.219,0-13.07,5.854-13.07,13.07v147.154C298.213,417.012,304.067,422.863,311.284,422.863z'/%3e%3c/g%3e%3c/g%3e%3c/svg%3e ");
     border-color:#FB404B;
     
 }
 
 .delete:hover {
     background-image: url("data:image/svg+xml;charset=UTF-8,%3csvg version='1.1' id='Capa_1' fill='#fff' xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2000/svg' xmlns:xlink='http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink' x='0px' y='0px' width='482.428px' height='482.429px' viewBox='0 0 482.428 482.429' style='enable-background:new 0 0 482.428 482.429;' xml:space='preserve'%3e%3cg%3e%3cg%3e%3cpath d='M381.163,57.799h-75.094C302.323,25.316,274.686,0,241.214,0c-33.471,0-61.104,25.315-64.85,57.799h-75.098 c-30.39,0-55.111,24.728-55.111,55.117v2.828c0,23.223,14.46,43.1,34.83,51.199v260.369c0,30.39,24.724,55.117,55.112,55.117 h210.236c30.389,0,55.111-24.729,55.111-55.117V166.944c20.369-8.1,34.83-27.977,34.83-51.199v-2.828 C436.274,82.527,411.551,57.799,381.163,57.799z M241.214,26.139c19.037,0,34.927,13.645,38.443,31.66h-76.879 C206.293,39.783,222.184,26.139,241.214,26.139z M375.305,427.312c0,15.978-13,28.979-28.973,28.979H136.096 c-15.973,0-28.973-13.002-28.973-28.979V170.861h268.182V427.312z M410.135,115.744c0,15.978-13,28.979-28.973,28.979H101.266 c-15.973,0-28.973-13.001-28.973-28.979v-2.828c0-15.978,13-28.979,28.973-28.979h279.897c15.973,0,28.973,13.001,28.973,28.979 V115.744z'/%3e%3cpath d='M171.144,422.863c7.218,0,13.069-5.853,13.069-13.068V262.641c0-7.216-5.852-13.07-13.069-13.07 c-7.217,0-13.069,5.854-13.069,13.07v147.154C158.074,417.012,163.926,422.863,171.144,422.863z'/%3e%3cpath d='M241.214,422.863c7.218,0,13.07-5.853,13.07-13.068V262.641c0-7.216-5.854-13.07-13.07-13.07 c-7.217,0-13.069,5.854-13.069,13.07v147.154C228.145,417.012,233.996,422.863,241.214,422.863z'/%3e%3cpath d='M311.284,422.863c7.217,0,13.068-5.853,13.068-13.068V262.641c0-7.216-5.852-13.07-13.068-13.07 c-7.219,0-13.07,5.854-13.07,13.07v147.154C298.213,417.012,304.067,422.863,311.284,422.863z'/%3e%3c/g%3e%3c/g%3e%3c/svg%3e ");        
     background-color: #FB404B;
    }
<a class="action-btn delete">&nbsp;</a>

You can convert your svg to data url here

  1. https://codepen.io/elliz/full/ygvgay
  2. https://websemantics.uk/tools/svg-to-background-image-conversion/
  • This wouldn't work for complex SVGs where you only want certain paths/polygons/etc.. to change on hover right? – Drew Baker May 7 at 19:35
  • No you can..but it very complex – patelarpan May 8 at 2:24
  • It just solutions for icon – patelarpan May 8 at 2:25
  • If some work with icon. Then it great. Bootstrap 4 also use this technic – patelarpan May 8 at 2:26

for :hover event animations we can left the styles inside svg file, like a

<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">
<defs>
  <style>
  rect {
    fill:rgb(165,225,75);
    stroke:none;
    transition: 550ms ease-in-out;
    transform-origin:125px 125px;
  }
  rect:hover {
    fill:rgb(75,165,225);
    transform:rotate(360deg);
  }
  </style>
</defs>
  <rect x='50' y='50' width='150' height='150'/>
</svg>

check this on svgshare

If this is a static change, then open the SVG file in Adobe Illustrator (or any suitable SVG editor) change the color and save it.

  • That doesn't seem to meet the requirements in the question, which require the colour to be changed by CSS. It's also already been suggested as a solution in one of the other answers. – Robert Longson Apr 22 at 10:35

protected by Community May 15 '13 at 14:07

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