76

how to compare the string which is passed as a parameter

the following method is not working.

 String str = "saveMe"

 compareString(str)

 def compareString(String str){
    def str2 = "saveMe"
    if(str2==${str}){
      println "same"
    }else{
      println "not same"
    }
 }    

also tried

 String str = "India"

 compareString(str)

 def compareString(String str){
   def str2 = "india"
   if( str2 == str ) {
     println "same"
   }else{
     println "not same"
   }
 }    
  • 19
    India is not the same as india. The first character is different – tim_yates Aug 16 '12 at 9:39
77

This line:

if(str2==${str}){

Should be:

if( str2 == str ) {

The ${ and } will give you a parse error, as they should only be used inside Groovy Strings for templating

| improve this answer | |
  • @user1602802 It does in the groovy console. What errors are you getting? – tim_yates Aug 16 '12 at 9:37
  • 24
    @user1602802 Are you comparing India with a capital I and india with a lower-case i like in the edit to your question? India != india. They are different. – tim_yates Aug 16 '12 at 9:39
109

This should be an answer

str2.equals( str )

If you want to ignore case

str2.equalsIgnoreCase( str )

| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    Downvoting because the original question did not specify that it should ignore care. Also, groovy supports the == operator for string comparison (in contrast with Java, where == does identity comparison, not string comparison). – brianmearns Sep 24 '19 at 19:15
  • I adjusted the answer to be case sensitive – ojblass Dec 17 '19 at 16:26
  • Is there a short alias for equalsIgnoreCase in Groovy? – Simon Logic Feb 5 at 15:51
  • I think you could create a wrapper function called eIC or something similar. Depends on how much it actually bugs you. – ojblass Feb 24 at 3:25
  • 1
    Warning. .equals() does not behave the same in Groovy as it does in Java. Example here -- scroll down to 'GString and String'. Basically both items have to be of the same type of String class. Since the String class is implicit in the assignment -- GString is a Groovy language construct and String is an inline definition, something like def foo = "foo" ... "${foo}".equals("foo") will return false. – ingyhere Apr 23 at 21:41
6

If you don't want to check on upper or lowercases you can use the following method.

String str = "India" 
compareString(str) 

def compareString(String str){ 
  def str2 = "india" 
  if( str2.toUpperCase() == str.toUpperCase() ) { 
    println "same" 
  }else{ 
    println "not same" 
  } 
}

So now if you change str to "iNdIa" it'll still work, so you lower the chance that you make a typo.

| improve this answer | |
  • 41
    str2.equalsIgnoreCase( str ) is probably easier to read :-) – tim_yates Aug 16 '12 at 9:54
  • @tim_yates not only is it easier to read, it is also more correct. Case conversions such as these are prone to locale errors (Turkish I etc). – Ohad Schneider Jan 3 '17 at 16:39
1

The shortest way (will print "not same" because String comparison is case sensitive):

def compareString = {
   it == "india" ? "same" : "not same"
}    

compareString("India")
| improve this answer | |
-3

In Groovy, null == null gets a true. At runtime, you won't know what happened. In Java, == is comparing two references.

This is a cause of big confusion in basic programming, Whether it is safe to use equals. At runtime, a null.equals will give an exception. You've got a chance to know what went wrong.

Especially, you get two values from keys not exist in map(s), == makes them equal.

| improve this answer | |
-6

use def variable, when you want to compare any String. Use below code for that type of comparison.

def variable name = null

SQL query give you some return. Use function with return type def.

def functionname(def variablename){

return variable name

}

if ("$variable name" == "true"){

}

| improve this answer | |

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