22

I have the following class hierarchy:

class A
class B extends A
class C extends A

then, there is another class which takes instances of these classes and there is a method, in which two cases of pattern-matching are possible like this:

class D (one: A, two: A) {

  def work {
    (one, two) match {
      case (o, t): (B, B) => ... blablabla
      case (o, t): (B, C) => ... blablabla
      case _ =>
    }
  }
}

However, when it should resolve the matching in favor of the second case (B, C), it tries resolving it as (B, B) and comes up with the class cast exception that C cannot be cast to B. Why? What to do? How can I come around this?

30

Your syntax isn't quite right (doesn't compile).

This works though:

object Matcher extends App {

  class A
  class B extends A
  class C extends A

  class D(one: A, two: A) {

    def work {
      (one, two) match {
        case (o: B, t: B) => println("B")
        case (o: B, t: C) => println("C")
        case _ =>
      }
    }
  }

  val d1 = new D(new B, new B)
  val d2 = new D(new B, new C)

  d1.work
  //B
  d2.work
  //C
}
0
8

The problem, as always, is erased types. (B,C) is syntactic sugar for Tuple2[B,C], which is erased to Tuple2 at runtime. The case statement verifies that (B,C) matches Tuple2, but then fails to cast it.

In your case, the easiest solution would be to match against 'one' and 'two' individually, rather than wrapping them in a tuple:

one match {
  case o : B => two match {
    case p : C => ...
    case p : B => ...
  }
  ... 
}

It's not so pretty, but it won't suffer from the same problems.

Edit: Actually, I'd go with Brian Smith's solution - matching inside the tuple rather than outside. It avoids the problem in a similar way, but looks nicer.

2

I made this code work.
Firstly I added a case to your class definition.

case class A
case class B extends A
case class C extends A

Secondly I changed the work.

class D(one: A, two: A) {
  def work {
    (one, two) match {
      case (o: B, t: B) => println("BB")
      case (o: B, t: C) => println("BC")
      case (o: C, t: C) => println("CC")
      case _ => println("AA")
    }
  }
}

Now what I got:

new D(B(),B()).work      => BB
new D(B(),C()).work      => BC
new D(C(),C()).work      => CC
new D(A(),B()).work      => AA

The case adds an apply and an unapply method.

5
  • Yeah, case classes... but they have bugs with inheritance.. I will be very happy if they fix that sometime... – noncom Aug 16 '12 at 12:35
  • 1
    This code won't compile in modern Scala, because case inheritance is prohibited since 2.9 I think. @noncom This is not a bug, this is by design – Nikita Volkov Aug 16 '12 at 21:51
  • @NikitaVolkov I copied this code from the REPL (Scala 2.9.1). It did compile. – tgr Aug 17 '12 at 4:12
  • @T.Grottker Not without warnings I'm sure. In Scala 2.10 it doesn't compile – Nikita Volkov Aug 17 '12 at 8:46
  • @NikitaVolkov no, actually I remember quite well them telling that implementing proper inheritance is very hard due to technical problems with compiler and JVM or something like that and the contemporal implementation contained bugs, i.e. "use at your own risk - it may work or it may break". Idk which way the things went next, maybe they've explicitly prohibited such inheritance.. because I have dropped Scala some years ago and went totally Clojure. – noncom Jan 31 '16 at 1:26

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