26

The following is a very simple makefile that does not seem to work properly.

TEST=ON

buildbegin:
ifeq ($(TEST),ON)        
    @echo TEST PASSED
else
    @echo TEST FAILED
endif

No matter what I set the TEST variable to, my ifeq statement passes. I always see TEST PASSED. Anyone see what I am doing wrong here?

EDIT:

ok. my example was not exactly accurate. What I actually have is this:

SHELL = /bin/sh

DEFAULT_TARGS:= all  all_debug  
DEBUG_TARGS:= all_debug
ALL_TARGS:= $(DEFAULT_TARGS) $(DEBUG_TARGS)

.PHONY: $(ALL_TARGS)
.PHONY: buildbegin

$(ALL_TARGS): buildbegin

TEST=ON

$(DEBUG_TARGS): TEST=OFF

buildbegin:
    @echo $(TEST)
ifeq ($(TEST),ON)
    @echo PASSED
else
    @echo FAILED
endif

Running either make all or make all_debug will result in "PASSED" being printed. If I echo $(TEST) before the condition, it looks as if my rules are changing the variable, but the ifeq only ever sees whatever the default value is.

3
  • Works for me - GNU Make 3.82
    – plaes
    Commented Aug 16, 2012 at 19:24
  • Works here as well - GNU 3.81
    – Thor
    Commented Aug 16, 2012 at 19:33
  • sorry. My example was flawed. I posted an edit with a real example
    – kalden
    Commented Aug 16, 2012 at 19:49

4 Answers 4

52

make evaluates conditionals when it reads a makefile (as you know it uses 2 passes), see: Conditional Parts of Makefiles. You can simply check this by using warning (which is good thing to debug makefiles):

buildbegin:
    @echo $(TEST)
$(warning now we reached ifeq TEST=$(TEST))
ifeq ($(TEST),ON)
    @echo PASSED
else
    @echo FAILED
endif

You should use shell commands instead and include them in rule:

buildbegin:
      @if [ "$(TEST)" = "ON" ]; then echo "PASSED"; else echo "FAILED"; fi
2
  • 1
    @user1604180 Welcome to SO! If this answer is the right one (and definitely, it is), you should accept it. Commented Aug 16, 2012 at 23:28
  • 1
    @kralyk thanks for pointing at this, it should be $(TEST) actually in this case, because we want this to be evaluated by make. But if you need evaluation within shell (not in this example), then yes - you should use $$TEST. But note that every line is executed in own shell process, so in this case you need to evaluate "within one make line before testing"
    – pmod
    Commented Dec 2, 2016 at 10:10
4

Here's a cleaner (I think, anyway) way to do what you want:

all:
    $(MAKE) TEST=ON buildbegin

all_debug:
    $(MAKE) TEST=OFF buildbegin

buildbegin:
    @echo $(TEST)
ifeq ($(TEST),ON)
    @echo PASSED
else
    @echo FAILED
endif
1
  • @pmod Sub-make inherits the environment of the parent Make, so there is no need to replicate variables explicitly. Commented Aug 17, 2012 at 9:04
2

Parameterise the shell command using make variables. This avoids recursive make and even the shell (make will fork the command directly and not go via a shell if the command contains no shell metacharacters (<>"&; and the like)).

Something like:

result<ON> := PASSED
result<OFF> := FAILED

buildbegin:
    @echo ${result-<${TEST}>}

The <...> is simply a convention to indicate some sort of indirection.

1

Although the question is old, I want to share a simpler way.

It is to use MAKECMDGOALSvariable that represents the list of targets.

In your case, a solution maybe:

buildbegin:
    @echo $(MAKECMDGOALS)
ifeq ($(MAKECMDGOALS),all)
    @echo PASSED
else ifeq ($(MAKECMDGOALS),debug_all)
    @echo FAILED
endif


debug_all: buildbegin

all: buildbegin

Usage: make debug_all or make all

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.