6

Today I received a reply to one of my emails in the form of a string of hex bytes:

"686170707920333974682068617665206120676f6f64206f6e6521"

And I was thinking of the most efficient clean way to convert the string into it's ASCII equivalent. I'll add my answer to the question but I didn't feel it was as elegant as it could have been.

1
  • A good number of solutions that work. I've selected @Inaimathi as the "winner" for the answer as it's the most complete with multiple alternatives. However all the answers are worth studying if you want examples of elisp code.
    – stsquad
    Aug 24 '12 at 10:50
10

Here's an iterative solution

(defun decode-hex-string (hex-string)
  (let ((res nil))
    (dotimes (i (/ (length hex-string) 2) (apply #'concat (reverse res)))
      (let ((hex-byte (substring hex-string (* 2 i) (* 2 (+ i 1)))))
        (push (format "%c" (string-to-number hex-byte 16)) res)))))

And one using loop, if you're looking to avoid side-effect operations (you may need to (require 'cl) in order to use this one):

(defun decode-hex-string (hex-string)
  (apply #'concat 
     (loop for i from 0 to (- (/ (length hex-string) 2) 1) 
           for hex-byte = (substring hex-string (* 2 i) (* 2 (+ i 1)))
           collect (format "%c" (string-to-number hex-byte 16)))))

In general, it's best to avoid recursion in Elisp and Common Lisp; your stack is going to keel over with a big enough input, and neither language guarantees tail recursion (which you aren't using, but still). In Scheme, it's a different story.

Incidentally, Happy 39th.

2
  • Thanks for posting two alternatives. I see the age-old dilemma of using cl in elisp comes up again. I suspect the cl stuff is easier to follow.
    – stsquad
    Aug 23 '12 at 10:03
  • @stsquad - In this instance, agreed. I think the CL guys nailed general iteration with the loop DSL, and everyone seems to be either ignoring the problem, not thinking it out as far, or deciding that map is the One True Way To Iterate™© (which, to be fair, makes some sense in lazy/functional languages with a single function/variable namespace).
    – Inaimathi
    Aug 23 '12 at 13:15
4

If you use Magnar Sveen's dash.el list API (and you should), try:

(concat (--map (string-to-number (concat it) 16) (-partition 2 (string-to-list "686170707920333974682068617665206120676f6f64206f6e6521"))))

the solution uses Emacs functions string-to-number, string-to-list and concat, and dash.el functions -partition and anaphoric version of -map. What's good about concat is that it concatenates not only strings, but lists or vectors of characters too. We can rewrite this code using ->> threading macro. It takes the result of 1st argument, then applies it to 2nd, 3rd, etc arguments, just like Unix pipe.

(->> (string-to-list "686170707920333974682068617665206120676f6f64206f6e6521")
  (-partition 2)
  (--map (string-to-number (concat it) 16))
  concat)
1
  • The threading macro looks neat but I found it hard to follow until I looked at how the macro expanded.
    – stsquad
    Mar 18 '14 at 15:29
3

For those that come here searching...

Elaborating a bit on Inaimathi's answer, here's the code to replace the selected region with the decoded hexa:

(defun decode-hex-string (hex-string)
  (apply #'concat 
         (loop for i from 0 to (- (/ (length hex-string) 2) 1) 
               for hex-byte = (substring hex-string (* 2 i) (* 2 (+ i 1)))
               collect (format "%c" (string-to-number hex-byte 16)))))

(defun hex-decode-region (start end) 
  "Decode a hex string in the selected region."
  (interactive "r")
  (save-excursion
    (let* ((decoded-text 
            (decode-hex-string 
             (buffer-substring start end))))
      (delete-region start end)
      (insert decoded-text))))

  (provide 'decode-hex-string)
  (provide 'hex-decode-region)

Save that on a file and then M-x load-file. Or put on ~/emacs.d, or whatever. Then select the region with the hexa contents and M-x hex-decode-region. Enjoy!

1

Here's mine. I'm not claiming this is particularly idiomatic or elegant, either. Maybe a bit old-skool.

(defun hex-string-decode (str)
  "Decode STR of the form \"4153434949\" to corresponding \"ASCII\"."
  (let (decoded sub)
    (while (> (length str) 0)
      (setq sub (substring str 0 2)
            decoded (cons (string-to-number sub 16) decoded)
            str (substring str 2) ) )
    (when (not (zerop (length str))) (error "residue %s" str))
    (mapconcat #'char-to-string (nreverse decoded) "") ) )
3
  • I'm intrigued by the use of setq over a let form. Is this the old-skoolness you refer to?
    – stsquad
    Aug 23 '12 at 10:03
  • The setq is inside a let form.
    – tripleee
    Aug 23 '12 at 10:36
  • Sorry, I was being blind. I have seen a lot of code in the style of let statements with a lot of calculation in them. Of course they are not iterating like this.
    – stsquad
    Aug 24 '12 at 10:48
1

Building the answers provided by Inaimathi and Shrein, I also added an encode function. Here is an implementation of both encode and decode, for both string and region arguments:

;; ASCII-HEX converion
(defun my/hex-decode-string (hex-string)
  (let ((res nil))
    (dotimes (i (/ (length hex-string) 2) (apply #'concat (reverse res)))
      (let ((hex-byte (substring hex-string (* 2 i) (* 2 (+ i 1)))))
        (push (format "%c" (string-to-number hex-byte 16)) res)))))

(defun my/hex-encode-string (ascii-string)
  (let ((res nil))
    (dotimes (i (length ascii-string) (apply #'concat (reverse res)))
      (let ((ascii-char (substring ascii-string i  (+ i 1))))
        (push (format "%x" (string-to-char ascii-char)) res)))))

(defun my/hex-decode-region (start end) 
  "Decode a hex string in the selected region."
  (interactive "r")
  (save-excursion
    (let* ((decoded-text 
            (my/hex-decode-string
             (buffer-substring start end))))
      (delete-region start end)
      (insert decoded-text))))

(defun my/hex-encode-region (start end) 
  "Encode a hex string in the selected region."
  (interactive "r")
  (save-excursion
    (let* ((encoded-text 
            (my/hex-encode-string
             (buffer-substring start end))))
      (delete-region start end)
      (insert encoded-text))))
0

This was the solution I came up with which struck me as a bit ugly:

(defun decode-hex-string(string)
  "Decode a hex string into ASCII"
  (let* ((hex-byte (substring string 0 2))
     (rest (substring string 2))
     (rest-as-string (if (> (length rest) 2)
                 (decode-hex-string rest)
               "")))
    (format "%c%s" (string-to-number hex-byte 16) rest-as-string)))
2
  • 2
    O(n) recursion is a bad idea in elisp -- there's no optimisation for recursion, so you'll run out of stack space with a sufficiently long string. Better to simply iterate through the string within the single function call.
    – phils
    Aug 17 '12 at 10:57
  • Most likey, although it seemed the easiest way to write it in a functional style. I would welcome an example using a single function call.
    – stsquad
    Aug 17 '12 at 11:58
0

At first I didn't see a requirement that it must be Elisp, so I did it interactively and the code below follows my interactive procedure.

   (defun decode-hex-string (hex-string)
      (with-temp-buffer
        (insert-char 32 (/ (length hex-string) 2))
        (beginning-of-buffer)
        (hexl-mode)        
        (hexl-insert-hex-string hex-string 1)
        (hexl-mode-exit)
        (buffer-string)))

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