193

Is there any quick way of getting Chrome to output timestamps in console.log writes (like Firefox does). Or is prepending new Date().getTime() the only option?

14 Answers 14

357

In Chrome, there is the option is Console Settings (Developer Tools -> Console -> Settings [upper-right corner] ) named "Show timestamps" which is exactly what I needed.

I've just found it. No other dirty hacks needed that destroys placeholders and erases place in the code where the messages was logged from.

Update for Chrome 68+

The "Show timestamps" setting has been moved to the Preferences pane of the "DevTools settings", found in the upper-right corner of the DevTools drawer:

enter image description here

  • 3
    As @Krzysztof Wolny pointed out, this is now built-in to Chrome 35 DevTools. (Yay!) Enable by opening developer tools (e.g. F12 or "Inspect Element"), click on the "gear" to view settings, then check the "Show timestamps" checkbox in the "Console" section. !Enable timestamps setting in devtools twitter.com/addyosmani#stream-item-tweet-485862365247053824 html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/developertools/chrome-35/… codereview.chromium.org/185713007 – iX3 Jul 7 '14 at 13:56
  • 1
    Is there a way to use a pattern for the timestamp in Chrome ? I only need the hour and minute. – Guus Jun 8 '16 at 8:59
  • 25
    On Chrome 68.0.3440.106 I had to open dev tools (F12) > click the three-dot menu in the top right > click settings > select Preferences in the left menu > check show timestamps in the Console section of the settings screen (top right) – tekiegirl Sep 4 '18 at 9:52
  • 3
    70.0.3538.110 (Official Build) (64-bit) This answer once worked for me: i.e. console "gear icon"; "Show timestamps" checkmark ... but now I don't see "Show timestamps" in Chrome 70.0.3538.110 (Official Build) (64-bit) So I tried @tekiegirl's suggestion re: Chrome 68: i.e. open dev tools (F12) > click the three-dot menu in the top right > click settings > select Preferences in the left menu > check show timestamps ... but I don't see "Preferences" in the left menu of Settings 70.0.3538.110 (Official Build) (64-bit) – The Red Pea Dec 5 '18 at 18:14
  • 1
    I posted a question on Google Product Forums, maybe some security setting is hiding "Show timestamps" From me? – The Red Pea Dec 6 '18 at 14:53
78
+50

Try this:

console.logCopy = console.log.bind(console);

console.log = function(data)
{
    var currentDate = '[' + new Date().toUTCString() + '] ';
    this.logCopy(currentDate, data);
};



Or this, in case you want a timestamp:

console.logCopy = console.log.bind(console);

console.log = function(data)
{
    var timestamp = '[' + Date.now() + '] ';
    this.logCopy(timestamp, data);
};



To log more than one thing and in a nice way (like object tree representation):

console.logCopy = console.log.bind(console);

console.log = function()
{
    if (arguments.length)
    {
        var timestamp = '[' + Date.now() + '] ';
        this.logCopy(timestamp, arguments);
    }
};



With format string (JSFiddle)

console.logCopy = console.log.bind(console);

console.log = function()
{
    // Timestamp to prepend
    var timestamp = new Date().toJSON();

    if (arguments.length)
    {
        // True array copy so we can call .splice()
        var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0);

        // If there is a format string then... it must
        // be a string
        if (typeof arguments[0] === "string")
        {
            // Prepend timestamp to the (possibly format) string
            args[0] = "%o: " + arguments[0];

            // Insert the timestamp where it has to be
            args.splice(1, 0, timestamp);

            // Log the whole array
            this.logCopy.apply(this, args);
        }
        else
        { 
            // "Normal" log
            this.logCopy(timestamp, args);
        }
    }
};


Outputs with that:

Sample output

P.S.: Tested in Chrome only.

P.P.S.: Array.prototype.slice is not perfect here for it would be logged as an array of objects rather than a series those of.

  • Rewritten the log statement to display objects in Chrome's console in a lovely manner, the previous version was simply showing "[object Object]" or sort of. – JSmyth Nov 7 '12 at 23:28
  • This only logs if there is only one thing to log. – Neal Mar 11 '13 at 16:40
  • @Neal, of course it doesn't - you have to extend it (; You can do something like this – JSmyth Mar 16 '13 at 11:35
  • This will not work in the general case where the first argument to log is a format string – dangonfast Feb 15 '14 at 17:49
  • The point is to call console.log, not console.logCopy – dangonfast Feb 15 '14 at 19:13
18

You can use dev tools profiler.

console.time('Timer name');
//do critical time stuff
console.timeEnd('Timer name');

"Timer name" must be the same. You can use multiple instances of timer with different names.

  • There's also console.timeStamp('foo') it just appears as a yellow point in the timeline. It didn't work for me when using names with spaces tho. – Vitim.us Nov 29 '16 at 22:03
  • this does not answer the question related to console.log or the logging at all – Andreas Dietrich Jun 13 '18 at 8:42
  • @AndreasDietrich why not? It does output to the console. More about it on this 2013 blogpost blog.mariusschulz.com/2013/11/22/… – JP Hellemons Aug 23 '18 at 8:45
10

I originally added this as a comment, but I wanted to add a screenshot as at least one person could not find the option (or maybe it was not available in their particular version for some reason).

On Chrome 68.0.3440.106 (and now checked in 72.0.3626.121) I had to

  • open dev tools (F12)
  • click the three-dot menu in the top right
  • click settings
  • select Preferences in the left menu
  • check show timestamps in the Console section of the settings screen

Settings > Preferences > Console > Show timestamps

7

I convert arguments to Array using Array.prototype.slice so that I can concat with another Array of what I want to add, then pass it into console.log.apply(console, /*here*/);

var log = function () {
    return console.log.apply(
        console,
        ['['+new Date().toISOString().slice(11,-5)+']'].concat(
            Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments)
        )
    );
};
log(['foo']); // [18:13:17] ["foo"]

It seems that arguments can be Array.prototype.unshifted too, but I don't know if modifying it like this is a good idea/will have other side effects

var log = function () {
    Array.prototype.unshift.call(
        arguments,
        '['+new Date().toISOString().slice(11,-5)+']'
    );
    return console.log.apply(console, arguments);
};
log(['foo']); // [18:13:39] ["foo"]
6

+new Date and Date.now() are alternate ways to get timestamps

  • Thanks, +1, but I was hoping that there might be some support for this without having to add code. – UpTheCreek Aug 17 '12 at 18:40
6

If you are using Google Chrome browser, you can use chrome console api:

  • console.time: call it at the point in your code where you want to start the timer
  • console.timeEnd: call it to stop the timer

The elapsed time between these two calls is displayed in the console.

For detail info, please see the doc link: https://developers.google.com/chrome-developer-tools/docs/console

  • To expand on this a little for those like me too lazy to go and look it up. The correct usage is: console.time("myMeasure"); [code you want to time] console.timeEnd("myMeasure"); – Samih Oct 1 '14 at 9:16
  • this does not answer the question related to console.log or the logging at all – Andreas Dietrich Jun 13 '18 at 8:43
6

From Chrome 68:

"Show timestamps" moved to settings

The Show timestamps checkbox previously in Console Settings Console Settings has moved to Settings.

enter image description here

  • 1
    @tekiegirl's answer has a screenshot showing where to find the checkbox in the DevTools Settings are ; the screenshot in this answer doesn't show me where to find the "Show timestamps" checkbox. – The Red Pea Apr 2 at 16:30
4

Try this also:

this.log = console.log.bind( console, '[' + new Date().toUTCString() + ']' );

This function puts timestamp, filename and line number as same of built-in console.log.

  • ׁThe log function created this way freezes a fixed timestamp; you'd have to re-run this every time you want an up-to-date time [= up to time Date ;-]. It is possible to make this a function but you'd have to use it like mklog()(...) instead of log(). – Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Oct 25 '14 at 18:32
3

If you want to preserve line number information (each message pointing to its .log() call, not all pointing to our wrapper), you have to use .bind(). You can prepend an extra timestamp argument via console.log.bind(console, <timestamp>) but the problem is you need to re-run this every time to get a function bound with a fresh timestamp. An awkward way to do that is a function that returns a bound function:

function logf() {
  // console.log is native function, has no .bind in some browsers.
  // TODO: fallback to wrapping if .bind doesn't exist...
  return Function.prototype.bind.call(console.log, console, yourTimeFormat());
}

which then has to be used with a double call:

logf()(object, "message...")

BUT we can make the first call implicit by installing a property with getter function:

var origLog = console.log;
// TODO: fallbacks if no `defineProperty`...
Object.defineProperty(console, "log", {
  get: function () { 
    return Function.prototype.bind.call(origLog, console, yourTimeFormat()); 
  }
});

Now you just call console.log(...) and automagically it prepends a timestamp!

> console.log(12)
71.919s 12 VM232:2
undefined
> console.log(12)
72.866s 12 VM233:2
undefined

You can even achieve this magical behavior with a simple log() instead of console.log() by doing Object.defineProperty(window, "log", ...).


See https://github.com/pimterry/loglevel for a well-done safe console wrapper using .bind(), with compatibility fallbacks.

See https://github.com/eligrey/Xccessors for compatibility fallbacks from defineProperty() to legacy __defineGetter__ API. If neither property API works, you should fallback to a wrapper function that gets a fresh timestamp every time. (In this case you lose line number info, but timestamps will still show.)


Boilerplate: Time formatting the way I like it:

var timestampMs = ((window.performance && window.performance.now) ?
                 function() { return window.performance.now(); } :
                 function() { return new Date().getTime(); });
function formatDuration(ms) { return (ms / 1000).toFixed(3) + "s"; }
var t0 = timestampMs();
function yourTimeFormat() { return formatDuration(timestampMs() - t0); }
2

This adds a "log" function to the local scope (using this) using as many arguments as you want:

this.log = function() {
    var args = [];
    args.push('[' + new Date().toUTCString() + '] ');
    //now add all the other arguments that were passed in:
    for (var _i = 0, _len = arguments.length; _i < _len; _i++) {
      arg = arguments[_i];
      args.push(arg);
    }

    //pass it all into the "real" log function
    window.console.log.apply(window.console, args); 
}

So you can use it:

this.log({test: 'log'}, 'monkey', 42);

Outputs something like this:

[Mon, 11 Mar 2013 16:47:49 GMT] Object {test: "log"} monkey 42

2

extended the very nice solution "with format string" from JSmyth to also support

  • all the other console.log variations (log,debug,info,warn,error)
  • including timestamp string flexibility param (e.g. 09:05:11.518 vs. 2018-06-13T09:05:11.518Z)
  • including fallback in case console or its functions do not exist in browsers

.

var Utl = {

consoleFallback : function() {

    if (console == undefined) {
        console = {
            log : function() {},
            debug : function() {},
            info : function() {},
            warn : function() {},
            error : function() {}
        };
    }
    if (console.debug == undefined) { // IE workaround
        console.debug = function() {
            console.info( 'DEBUG: ', arguments );
        }
    }
},


/** based on timestamp logging: from: https://stackoverflow.com/a/13278323/1915920 */
consoleWithTimestamps : function( getDateFunc = function(){ return new Date().toJSON() } ) {

    console.logCopy = console.log.bind(console)
    console.log = function() {
        var timestamp = getDateFunc()
        if (arguments.length) {
            var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0)
            if (typeof arguments[0] === "string") {
                args[0] = "%o: " + arguments[0]
                args.splice(1, 0, timestamp)
                this.logCopy.apply(this, args)
            } else this.logCopy(timestamp, args)
        }
    }
    console.debugCopy = console.debug.bind(console)
    console.debug = function() {
        var timestamp = getDateFunc()
        if (arguments.length) {
            var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0)
            if (typeof arguments[0] === "string") {
                args[0] = "%o: " + arguments[0]
                args.splice(1, 0, timestamp)
                this.debugCopy.apply(this, args)
            } else this.debugCopy(timestamp, args)
        }
    }
    console.infoCopy = console.info.bind(console)
    console.info = function() {
        var timestamp = getDateFunc()
        if (arguments.length) {
            var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0)
            if (typeof arguments[0] === "string") {
                args[0] = "%o: " + arguments[0]
                args.splice(1, 0, timestamp)
                this.infoCopy.apply(this, args)
            } else this.infoCopy(timestamp, args)
        }
    }
    console.warnCopy = console.warn.bind(console)
    console.warn = function() {
        var timestamp = getDateFunc()
        if (arguments.length) {
            var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0)
            if (typeof arguments[0] === "string") {
                args[0] = "%o: " + arguments[0]
                args.splice(1, 0, timestamp)
                this.warnCopy.apply(this, args)
            } else this.warnCopy(timestamp, args)
        }
    }
    console.errorCopy = console.error.bind(console)
    console.error = function() {
        var timestamp = getDateFunc()
        if (arguments.length) {
            var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0)
            if (typeof arguments[0] === "string") {
                args[0] = "%o: " + arguments[0]
                args.splice(1, 0, timestamp)
                this.errorCopy.apply(this, args)
            } else this.errorCopy(timestamp, args)
        }
    }
}
}  // Utl

Utl.consoleFallback()
//Utl.consoleWithTimestamps()  // defaults to e.g. '2018-06-13T09:05:11.518Z'
Utl.consoleWithTimestamps( function(){ return new Date().toJSON().replace( /^.+T(.+)Z.*$/, '$1' ) } )  // e.g. '09:05:11.518'
  • a disadvantage though is that (e.g. in FF 56.0) it does not show the source location of the log statement, but the one from the Utl.js above. so enabling (on-demand commenting in/out) of the Utl.consoleWithTimestamps(...)-override may make sense – Andreas Dietrich Jun 13 '18 at 9:27
1

I have this in most Node.JS apps. It also works in the browser.

function log() {
  const now = new Date();
  const currentDate = `[${now.toISOString()}]: `;
  const args = Array.from(arguments);
  args.unshift(currentDate);
  console.log.apply(console, args);
}
0

A refinement on the answer by JSmyth:

console.logCopy = console.log.bind(console);

console.log = function()
{
    if (arguments.length)
    {
        var timestamp = new Date().toJSON(); // The easiest way I found to get milliseconds in the timestamp
        var args = arguments;
        args[0] = timestamp + ' > ' + arguments[0];
        this.logCopy.apply(this, args);
    }
};

This:

  • shows timestamps with milliseconds
  • assumes a format string as first parameter to .log
  • This looks almost all good, except that if you console.log(document, window), i.e. without the format string assumption, then you'd get smth. like 2014-02-15T20:02:17.284Z > [object HTMLDocument] Window {…} instead of document being represented as an expandable object tree. – JSmyth Feb 15 '14 at 20:07
  • See here where I tried to find a solution to the issue you brought up (also updated my answer though prematurely). – JSmyth Feb 15 '14 at 21:13
  • @JSmyth: sure, that is why one of the requirements of my refinement is that the first argument is a format string. To make it flexible, probably a check of the first argument to be a string would be enough. – dangonfast Feb 15 '14 at 21:59

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