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Is there a way to alter the precision of an existing decimal column in Microsoft SQL Server?

5 Answers 5

205
ALTER TABLE Testing ALTER COLUMN TestDec decimal(16,1)

Just put decimal(precision, scale), replacing the precision and scale with your desired values.

I haven't done any testing with this with data in the table, but if you alter the precision, you would be subject to losing data if the new precision is lower.

3
  • 2
    This worked for me when increasing the precision for a decimal(18,2) to decimal(18,3).
    – Rebecca
    Commented Jul 16, 2010 at 15:33
  • If you have a 16 (total) digit number and you increase the scale, will it trounce on the higher-order digits to make room for the 2 new decimal places? Unfortunately I can't test this at the moment.
    – user420667
    Commented Apr 4, 2013 at 0:53
  • 14
    To answer my own question, I created a sqlfiddle: sqlfiddle.com/#!3/4b8cb/1/0 . The answer is that changing decimal(18,2) to decimal(18,3) will result in an error when altering the table. decimal(18,2) to decimal(19,3) though ought to work.
    – user420667
    Commented Apr 4, 2013 at 18:06
19

There may be a better way, but you can always copy the column into a new column, drop it and rename the new column back to the name of the first column.

to wit:

ALTER TABLE MyTable ADD NewColumnName DECIMAL(16, 2);
GO

UPDATE  MyTable
SET     NewColumnName = OldColumnName;
GO

ALTER TABLE CONTRACTS DROP COLUMN OldColumnName;
GO


EXEC sp_rename
    @objname = 'MyTable.NewColumnName',
    @newname = 'OldColumnName',
    @objtype = 'COLUMN'
GO

This was tested on SQL Server 2008 R2, but should work on SQL Server 2000+.

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ALTER TABLE (Your_Table_Name) MODIFY (Your_Column_Name) DATA_TYPE();

For you problem:

ALTER TABLE (Your_Table_Name) MODIFY (Your_Column_Name) DECIMAL(Precision, Scale); 
1

In my case I needed to fix a calculated column without the designer wanting to drop and create the original table, and one my column happened to be a DECIMAL(18, 2) and it refused to let me update all the records that were Null to 0.00, as there was allot of issues updating over 1 million records, and the reason I needed to update the null values to 0.00, was because there was a default set for 0.00, and it should never have ended up with a null value, but it did.

So what I had the do is quickly drop the old calculated one, and create a new calculated one, and this was the only way I could actually alter it without getting stuck with complex routines.

Hope this helps someone that eneded up in the same scenario. Now I need to figure out how that default value of 0.00 was overridden with NULL....

ALTER TABLE MyTable DROP COLUMN OldColumnName;
GO

ALTER TABLE MyTable ADD NewColumnName as AS (DecimalColumn1 * DecimalColumn1);
GO
-1

In Oracle 10G and later following statement will work.

ALTER TABLE <TABLE_NAME> MODIFY <COLUMN_NAME> <DATA_TYPE>

If the current data type is NUMBER(5,2) and you want to change it to NUMBER(10,2), following is the statement

ALTER TABLE <TABLE_NAME> MODIFY <COLUMN_NAME> NUMBER(10,2)

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