40

Assume we have such code:

public class Observer
{
    public event EventHandler X = delegate { };
}

public class Receiver
{
    public void Method(object o) {}
}

public class Program
{
    public static void DoSomething(object a, object b, Observer observer, Receiver r)
    {
        var rCopy = r;
        EventHandler action1 = (s, e) => rCopy.Method(a);
        EventHandler action2 = (s, e) => r.Method(b);
        observer.X += action1;
        observer.X += action2;
    }

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var observer = new Observer();
        var receiver = new Receiver();
        DoSomething(new object(), new object(), observer, receiver);
    }
}

Here action1 and action2 have completely separated set of captured variables - rCopy was created especially for this. Still, compiler generates just one class to capture everything (checked generated IL). I suppose it is done for optimization reasons, but it allows very hard-to-spot memory leak bugs: if a and b captured in single class, GC is unable to collect both at least so long as any of lambdas are referenced.

Is there a way to convince compiler to produce two different capture classes? Or any reason why it cannot be done?

P.S. Somewhat more detailed, in my blog: here and here.

  • Could this be due to the implementation of C# closures? – Davin Tryon Aug 17 '12 at 16:33
  • It's a good point, but wouldn't it be cleaner to simplify DoSomething to take a single object and call it twice? Then you'd get two separate instances of the generated wrapper. – lesscode Aug 17 '12 at 16:37
  • @Wayne It is a very-very simplified case just to demonstrate the problem. In real case I ended up with writing 'closure class' (similar to compiler rewrite) by hand and this problem was solved. But the code became divided into parts and harder to read. Well, result is far from making me proud of it :) – Ivan Danilov Aug 17 '12 at 16:50
  • 2
    Here is another blog post explaining the issue. Not sure if it really helps much though. – Servy Aug 17 '12 at 16:53
  • 3
    Asked 59 minutes ago and still no Skeet answer? I'm getting worried... ;) – Dean Kuga Aug 17 '12 at 17:09
35

You have rediscovered a known shortcoming in the implementation of anonymous functions in C#. I described the problem in my blog in 2007.

Is there a way to convince compiler to produce two different capture classes?

No.

Or any reason why it cannot be done?

There is no theoretical reason why an improved algorithm for partitioning closed-over variables so that they are hoisted into different closure classes could not be devised. We have not done so for practical reasons: the algorithm is complicated, expensive to get right and expensive to test, and we have always had higher priorities. Hopefully that will change in Roslyn, but we are making no guarantees.

| improve this answer | |
27

I'm fairly sure you are seeing practical limitations in the compiler's code rewriting logic, it is not simple to do. The workaround is easy enough, create the lambda in a separate method so you get two separate instances of the hidden class:

public static void DoSomething(object a, object b, Observer observer, Receiver r) {
    var rCopy = r;
    observer.X += register(r, a);
    observer.X += register(rCopy, b);
}
private static EventHandler register(Receiver r, object obj) {
    return new EventHandler((s, e) => r.Method(obj));
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    At this point, is the Receiver copy required? couldn't you get away with just using the original Receiver in both methods, and not have an Implicit capture? – WillFM Apr 19 '13 at 18:35

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