81

In popular imperative languages, switch statements generally "fall through" to the next level once a case statement has been matched.

Example:

int a = 2;
switch(a)
{
   case 1:
      print "quick ";
   case 2: 
      print "brown ";
   case 3: 
      print "fox ";
      break;
   case 4:
      print "jumped ";
}

would print "brown fox".

However the same code in bash

A=2
case $A in
2)
  echo "QUICK"
  ;&
2)
  echo "BROWN"
  ;&
3)
  echo "FOX"
  ;&
4)
  echo "JUMPED"
  ;&
esac

only prints "BROWN"

How do I make the case statement in bash "fall through" to the remaining conditions like the first example?

(edit: Bash version 3.2.25, the ;& statement (from wiki) results in a syntax error)

running:

test.sh:

#!/bin/bash
A=2
case $A in
1)
  echo "QUICK"
  ;&
2)
  echo "BROWN"
  ;&
3)
  echo "FOX"
  ;&
esac

Gives:

./test.sh: line 6: syntax error near unexpected token ;' ./test.sh:
line 6:
;&'

1

5 Answers 5

55

The ;& and ;;& operators were introduced in bash 4.0, so if you want to stick with a five year old version of bash, you'll either have to repeat code, or use ifs.

if (( a == 1)); then echo quick; fi
if (( a > 0 && a <= 2)); then echo brown; fi 
if (( a > 0 && a <= 3)); then echo fox; fi
if (( a == 4)); then echo jumped; fi

or find some other way to achieve the actual goal.

(On a side note, don't use all uppercase variable names. You risk overwriting special shell variables or environment variables.)

13
  • Wow! Thank you, I see now my 'new' MacBookPro 2012 has a very old 2007 Bash: GNU bash, version 3.2.48(1)-release (x86_64-apple-darwin12) Dec 7, 2013 at 18:07
  • 6
    @AnneTheAgile, yes. bash 3.2 is GPLv2, bash 4.0 (and newer) is GPLv3, and Apple "doesn't like" GPLv3 (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPL_v3#Legal_Barrier_to_App_Stores). Though you can easily get a recent bash with homebrew or macports or similar, of course.
    – geirha
    Dec 9, 2013 at 10:02
  • 2
    @Will not in bash and sh, since shell variables share the namespace with environment variables and special shell variables.
    – geirha
    Jun 10, 2017 at 5:32
  • 1
    @Will, part of "avoid namespace conflicts" is staying out of the namespace that POSIX specifies for use for variables meaningful to the operating system and shell. That namespace is defined by the standard as the set of all-caps names; see pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/basedefs/…, keeping in mind that environment and shell variables share a namespace. Jul 24, 2019 at 20:04
  • 1
    @user2066657: 12 is for Bash 4, 15 for 3.2. But to the point: the reason Apple blocks 4.0 is not because it's less "enterprisey" than 3.2, it's because of GPL3. It has nothing to do with stability, maturity or security. It's not a technical decision, please stop implying so.
    – MestreLion
    Apr 21, 2021 at 7:10
55

Try this:

case $VAR in
normal)
    echo "This doesn't do fallthrough"
    ;;
fallthrough)
    echo -n "This does "
    ;&
somethingelse)
    echo "fall-through"
    ;;
esac
3
  • 2
    Thanks for the info. I'd change the "name" of the third case, though, e.g. to somethingElse.
    – fotNelton
    Oct 19, 2015 at 10:20
  • 3
    When I try this, I get syntax error near unexpected token `;' on the line with ;&. Why is this? Feb 13, 2020 at 0:52
  • 4
    @CameronHudson because you're using a version of Bash earlier than 4.0
    – Josh
    Feb 13, 2020 at 21:48
13

Using ;& is not very portable, as it requires bash (not ash, dash, or any other minimal sh) and it requires at least bash 4.0 or newer (not available on all systems, e.g. macOS 10.14.6 still only offers bash 3.2.57).

A work around that I consider much nicer to read than a lot of if's is loop and modify the case var:

#!/bin/sh

A=2
A_BAK=$A
while [ -n "$A" ]; do
    case $A in
        1)
            echo "QUICK"
            A=2
            ;;

        2)
            echo "BROWN"
            A=3
            ;;

        3)
            echo "FOX"
            A=4
            ;;

        4)
            echo "JUMPED"
            A=""
            ;;
    esac
done
A=$A_BAK

Here's a proof of concept: https://www.onlinegdb.com/0ngLPXXn8

10
  • 2
    "real sh" is what, pre-POSIX (aka 1970s-era-syntax) Bourne? Jul 24, 2019 at 20:06
  • 4
    @CharlesDuffy /bin/sh is a Bourne shell, the common base for BASH, DASH, ASH and also for the POSIX standard. Each of these shells support additional features, some unique to the shell but they are all SH compatible, unlike some other shells (csh and tcsh are not, zsh is only partially)
    – Mecki
    Jul 27, 2019 at 15:34
  • 5
    Bourne is a shell from the 1970s. POSIX sh is a specification from 1991. /bin/sh on modern systems is POSIX, not Bourne. To pick an easy-to-test-for difference, echo hello ^ cat will emit hello on Bourne, because ^ is a pipe character there; whereas in a POSIX-compliant shell, it emits hello ^ cat as output, because the ^ is parsed as an argument to echo. Jul 27, 2019 at 15:35
  • 2
    (Incidentally, the ^-as-a-pipe-character difference is the one that GNU autoconf uses to distinguish whether it's on Bourne or POSIX sh; that said, the POSIX spec generally took a lot of inspiration from early ksh, and thus codified behaviors that were originally ksh extensions). Jul 27, 2019 at 15:41
  • 4
    Definitely valid answer. Many embedded machines ship with ash and even sh in ubuntu is dash. For those shells this answer is valid. Have no idea why this is downvoted and why are we arguing whether non bash, sh is relevant...It is even quite elegant and idiomatic Dec 10, 2019 at 16:16
0

Use a sequence of case statements with pattern alternation:

#!/bin/sh

a="2"
case "$a" in
    "1")
        echo "QUICK"
        ;;
esac
case "$a" in
    "1" | "2")
        echo "BROWN"
        ;;
esac
case "$a" in
    "1" | "2" | "3")
        echo "FOX"
        ;;
esac
case "$a" in
    "4")
        echo "JUMPED"
        ;;
esac

Benefits:

  • Follows the format of the original question
  • Works with any POSIX-compliant sh, including old versions of Bash
  • Unordered string values of a such as "apple", "pear", "banana", "tree" will work
  • Control flow is straightforward without backward branches

Disadvantages:

  • More characters are needed since there are four case statements instead of just one

Note that lowercase a is better than uppercase A for non-environment variables and that $a as well as the case patterns should be quoted for the general case where a might have spaces in it. Quoting can be removed for simple cases.

-2

bash switch with fallthrough, implemented with function and flag

#! /bin/sh

switch_fallthrough() {
  [ $# = 0 ] && { echo no value >&2; return; }
  local f= # fall through
  [ "$1" = 1 ] && { echo quick; f=1; }
  [ $f ] || [ "$1" = 2 ] && { echo brown; f=1; }
  [ $f ] || [ "$1" = 3 ] && { echo fox; return; }
  [ $f ] || [ "$1" = 4 ] && echo jumped
  return 1 # error = no case did match
}

switch_fallthrough "2"
# brown
# fox
2
  • this is neither a regex nor a fallthrough, sorry
    – xeruf
    Feb 6 at 18:55
  • thx, fixed ....
    – milahu
    Feb 7 at 8:14

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