112

Basically my mate has been saying that I could make my code shorter by using a different way of checking if an int array contains an int, although he won't tell me what it is :P.

Current:

public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {
    for (final int i : array) {
        if (i == key) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Have also tried this, although it always returns false for some reason.

public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {
    return Arrays.asList(array).contains(key);
}

Could anyone help me out?

Thank you.

8
  • 8
    Your Arrays.asList(...) call takes a vararg, that is it will wrap the arbitrary number of arguments you might pass into that in a List. In your case, you're getting a list of arrays with a single element, and this list obviously does not contain the int.
    – sarcan
    Aug 18, 2012 at 16:45
  • Your comment meaning what now?
    – sarcan
    Aug 18, 2012 at 16:49
  • check Hashset based retrial mechanism answer. It is the fastest way. Aug 18, 2012 at 17:22
  • I don't see any point at making your original code shorter since your argument is a primitive array and your code is very clear and straightfoward. ArrayList implementation is doing the same.
    – Genzer
    Aug 18, 2012 at 17:38
  • I would not make your code shorter. (1) arraylist does the same thing you did. (2) - more important stuff is that the shorten code using Arrays.asList creates new object, which could be problem within some performance critical code. The first code snippet is best thing you can do. Jan 5, 2015 at 6:33

15 Answers 15

74

You could simply use ArrayUtils.contains from Apache Commons Lang library.

public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {     
    return ArrayUtils.contains(array, key);
}
4
  • 1
    As long as you are using ArrayUtils, is there any reason not to use ArrayUtils.contains
    – mejdev
    Dec 23, 2014 at 17:52
  • 2
    No reason whatsoever :)
    – Reimeus
    Dec 23, 2014 at 19:51
  • 30
    It's worth noting that ArrayUtils.contains() is part of Apache Commons Lang library. Even though that's a great lib, it is probably still not a good idea to add external dependency just to check if array contains an element :D
    – Krzysiek
    Mar 9, 2017 at 20:33
  • 2
    ArrayUtils is a thing of past. Java 8+ and Guava have pretty amazing goodies!!
    – TriCore
    May 13, 2017 at 23:41
57

Here is Java 8 solution

public static boolean contains(final int[] arr, final int key) {
    return Arrays.stream(arr).anyMatch(i -> i == key);
}
1
  • Note that this call requires API level 24
    – Mathieu
    Feb 2, 2021 at 14:43
37

It's because Arrays.asList(array) returns List<int[]>. The array argument is treated as one value you want to wrap (you get a list of arrays of ints), not as vararg.

Note that it does work with object types (not primitives):

public boolean contains(final String[] array, final String key) {
    return Arrays.asList(array).contains(key);
}

or even:

public <T>  boolean contains(final T[] array, final T key) {
    return Arrays.asList(array).contains(key);
}

But you cannot have List<int> and autoboxing is not working here.

1
  • 1
    Why autoboxing does not work, is it because it is declared as final?
    – subhashis
    Jan 25, 2016 at 10:51
21

Guava offers additional methods for primitive types. Among them a contains method which takes the same arguments as yours.

public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {
    return Ints.contains(array, key);
}

You might as well statically import the guava version.

See Guava Primitives Explained

19

A different way:

public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {  
     Arrays.sort(array);  
     return Arrays.binarySearch(array, key) >= 0;  
}  

This modifies the passed-in array. You would have the option to copy the array and work on the original array i.e. int[] sorted = array.clone();
But this is just an example of short code. The runtime is O(NlogN) while your way is O(N)

6
  • 35
    I think I'd be surprised if a contains method modified my array.
    – Zong
    Aug 18, 2012 at 16:56
  • @ZongLi:This is just an example for the OP.Updated OP if we are nitpicking
    – Cratylus
    Aug 18, 2012 at 17:01
  • 5
    From javadoc of binarySearch(): "the return value will be >= 0 if and only if the key is found." so Arrays.binarySearch(array,key)>=0 should be returned!
    – icza
    Apr 24, 2014 at 12:25
  • Supplement: The return value of binarySearch() is (-(insertion point) - 1) if key is not contained which may likely be a value other than -1.
    – icza
    Apr 24, 2014 at 12:32
  • This can't be -1 if it is intending to be true. "The insertion point is defined as the point at which the key would be inserted into the list: the index of the first element greater than the key, or list.size() if all elements in the list are less than the specified key.". Need to say >= 0. Apr 25, 2014 at 13:14
18

I know it's super late, but try Integer[] instead of int[].

1
  • This is the solution.
    – silent_27
    Mar 30, 2019 at 22:29
2

1.one-off uses

List<T> list=Arrays.asList(...)
list.contains(...)

2.use HashSet for performance consideration if you use more than once.

Set <T>set =new HashSet<T>(Arrays.asList(...));
set.contains(...)
2

You can convert your primitive int array into an arraylist of Integers using below Java 8 code,

List<Integer> arrayElementsList = Arrays.stream(yourArray).boxed().collect(Collectors.toList());

And then use contains() method to check if the list contains a particular element,

boolean containsElement = arrayElementsList.contains(key);
1

Try this:

public static void arrayContains(){
    int myArray[]={2,2,5,4,8};

    int length=myArray.length;

    int toFind = 5;
    boolean found = false;

    for(int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        if(myArray[i]==toFind) {
            found=true;
        }
    }

    System.out.println(myArray.length);
    System.out.println(found); 
}
0

this worked in java 8

public static boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key)
{
return Arrays.stream(array).anyMatch(n->n==key);
}
5
  • It should immediately return on first match, instead this will still scan all the items in array, even if it did find the match. (Consider an array of trilion items)
    – TriCore
    May 13, 2017 at 23:49
  • You are right try this public static boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) { return Arrays.stream(array).anyMatch(n->n==key); } May 15, 2017 at 5:38
  • Java 8 stream anyMatch is a short-circuit operation and will not scan all items in the array. Apr 25, 2018 at 14:11
  • @LordParsley Above code's goal is check element in array ,not scan all element of array. Apr 27, 2018 at 5:34
  • Sorry, I see the answer was edited. I was just reiterating it was correct as it will not need to scan all if it finds one part way. Apr 28, 2018 at 13:24
0

You can use java.util.Arrays class to transform the array T[?] in a List<T> object with methods like contains:

Arrays.asList(int[] array).contains(int key);
0
private static void solutions() {
    int[] A = { 1, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 };
    int[] B = { 6, 7, 20, 80, 100 };
    int[] C = { 3, 4, 15, 20, 30, 70, 80, 120 };

    List<Integer> aList = Arrays.stream(A).boxed().collect(Collectors.toList());

    List<Integer> cList = Arrays.stream(C).boxed().collect(Collectors.toList());
    String s = "";
    for (Integer a : C) {
        if (aList.contains(a) && cList.contains(a)) {
            s = s.concat(String.valueOf(a)).concat("->");
        }
    }
}
0

Java 9+

public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {
    return List.of(array).contains(key);
}
-1

Depending on how large your array of int will be, you will get much better performance if you use collections and .contains rather than iterating over the array one element at a time:

import static org.junit.Assert.assertTrue;
import java.util.HashSet;

import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.Test;

public class IntLookupTest {

int numberOfInts = 500000;
int toFind = 200000;
int[] array;

HashSet<Integer> intSet;

@Before
public void initializeArrayAndSet() {
    array = new int[numberOfInts];
    intSet = new HashSet<Integer>();
    for(int i = 0; i < numberOfInts; i++) {
        array[i] = i;
        intSet.add(i);
    }
}

@Test
public void lookupUsingCollections() {
    assertTrue(intSet.contains(toFind));
}

@Test
public void iterateArray() {
    assertTrue(contains(array, toFind));

}

public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {
    for (final int i : array) {
        if (i == key) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
}
-6

Try Integer.parseInt() to do this.....

public boolean chkInt(final int[] array){
    int key = false;

    for (Integer i : array){


          try{

                   Integer.parseInt(i);
                   key = true;
                   return key;

             }catch(NumberFormatException ex){

                   key = false;

                   return key;

              }


     }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.