162

From the official documentation (source):

process.memoryUsage()

Returns an object describing the memory usage of the Node process measured in bytes.

var util = require('util');

console.log(util.inspect(process.memoryUsage()));

This will generate:

{ rss: 4935680, heapTotal: 1826816, heapUsed: 650472 }

heapTotal and heapUsed refer to V8's memory usage.

Exactly what do rss, heapTotal, and heapUsed stand for?

It might seem like a trivial question, but I've been looking and I could not find a clear answer so far.

5 Answers 5

225

In order to answer this question, one has to understand V8’s Memory Scheme first.

A running program is always represented through some space allocated in memory. This space is called Resident Set. V8 uses a scheme similar to the Java Virtual Machine and divides the memory into segments:

  • Code: the actual code being executed
  • Stack: contains all value types (primitives like integer or Boolean) with pointers referencing objects on the heap and pointers defining the control flow of the program
  • Heap: a memory segment dedicated to storing reference types like objects, strings and closures. enter image description here

Now it is easy to answer the question:

  • rss: Resident Set Size
  • heapTotal: Total Size of the Heap
  • heapUsed: Heap actually Used

Ref: http://apmblog.dynatrace.com/2015/11/04/understanding-garbage-collection-and-hunting-memory-leaks-in-node-js/

7
  • 63
    A picture can be worth 1000 words. Jul 8, 2016 at 12:39
  • 14
    @bmacnaughton This one is worth 1013 words :)
    – alex
    Mar 27, 2017 at 14:46
  • 4
    [rss, heapTotal, heapUsed] => size in megabytes? kilobytes? can you add that to your answer? are they all the same units? Mar 6, 2018 at 1:13
  • 2
    there is a new property "external" on process.memoryUsage(), anyone know about that
    – user11810894
    Jul 31, 2019 at 6:34
  • 1
    I am getting heap sizes > rss, how come? rss, 46.03MB heapTotal, 97.06MB heapUsed, 89.45MB
    – mlntdrv
    Jun 13 at 14:09
41

RSS is the resident set size, the portion of the process's memory held in RAM (as opposed to the swap space or the part held in the filesystem).

The heap is the portion of memory from which newly allocated objects will come from (think of malloc in C, or new in JavaScript).

You can read more about the heap at Wikipedia.

6
  • 4
    I don't think it's the total memory. On my machine the total memory is 8GB, but when I run a simple node process the RSS shows around 13MB, so I think it really shows how much memory is held in the RAM by this process.
    – Stefan
    Dec 2, 2013 at 8:00
  • 1
    @Stefan right, I came across some sort of bug back then, but RSS seems to be reliable to me now.
    – Mahn
    Apr 3, 2014 at 15:59
  • 4
    What's the difference between heapTotal and heapUsed?
    – tiblu
    Nov 12, 2015 at 12:03
  • 3
    @tiblu heapTotal is the total allocated heap space by the underlying V8 engine, for dynamic allocations. heapUsed is the memory used within that total space. Both are managed by V8, and are subject to grow/shrink whenever necessary.
    – elyas-bhy
    Dec 17, 2015 at 10:55
  • 4
    An image that visualises the different memory spaces: apmblog.dynatrace.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/DK_2.png
    – elyas-bhy
    Jan 6, 2016 at 17:06
17

The Node.js documentation describes it as follows:

heapTotal and heapUsed refer to V8's memory usage. external refers to the memory usage of C++ objects bound to JavaScript objects managed by V8. rss, Resident Set Size, is the amount of space occupied in the main memory device (that is a subset of the total allocated memory) for the process, which includes the heap, code segment and stack.

All mentioned values are expressed in bytes. So, if you just want to print them, you probably want to rescale them to MB:

const used = process.memoryUsage();
for (let key in used) {
  console.log(`Memory: ${key} ${Math.round(used[key] / 1024 / 1024 * 100) / 100} MB`);
}

That will give you an output like:

Memory: rss 522.06 MB
Memory: heapTotal 447.3 MB
Memory: heapUsed 291.71 MB
Memory: external 0.13 MB
2

Let's do this with an Example

The following example will show you how the increase in memory usage will actually increase the rss and heapTotal

const numeral = require('numeral');
let m = new Map();
for (let i = 0; i < 100000; i++) {
    m.set(i, i);
    if (i % 10000 === 0) { 
        const { rss, heapTotal } = process.memoryUsage();
        console.log( 'rss', numeral(rss).format('0.0 ib'), heapTotal, numeral(heapTotal).format('0.0 ib') )
    } 
}

Running The above will give you something like this:

rss 22.3 MiB 4734976 4.5 MiB
rss 24.2 MiB 6483968 6.2 MiB
rss 27.6 MiB 9580544 9.1 MiB
rss 27.6 MiB 9580544 9.1 MiB
rss 29.3 MiB 11419648 10.9 MiB
rss 29.3 MiB 11419648 10.9 MiB
rss 29.3 MiB 11419648 10.9 MiB
rss 32.8 MiB 15093760 14.4 MiB
rss 32.9 MiB 15093760 14.4 MiB
rss 32.9 MiB 15093760 14.4 MiB

This clearly shows you how using variable and continuously incrementing the space required by it increases the heapTotal and correspondingly the Resident Set Size(rss)

2

RSS is a reasonable measure for the "total memory usage of the Node.js interpreter process". You simply be able to run your program if that goes above the available RAM. Note however that it excludes some types of memory, so the actual memory consumption on a server that just runs a single process could be higher (VSZ is the worst case).

The concept of RSS is defined in the Linux kernel itself as mentioned at: What is RSS and VSZ in Linux memory management and measures the total memory usage of the process. This value can therefore be measured by external programs such as ps without knowledge of Node.js internals, e.g. as shown at: Retrieve CPU usage and memory usage of a single process on Linux?

heapTotal and heapUsed are concepts internal to the Node.js implementation. It would be good to look at the v8 source code to understand them more precisely, notably I wonder if they just obtain those values from glibc with functions such as those mentioned at: API call to get current heap size of process? of if it has its own heap management done on top of it.

For the concept of heap in general see also: What and where are the stack and heap? and What is the function of the push / pop instructions used on registers in x86 assembly? The heap is overwhelmingly likely to take the majority of memory in a JavaScript program, I don't think you will ever bother to try and look for that memory elsewhere (besides perhaps typed arrays perhaps, which show separately under process.memoryUsage()).

The following code example can be used to do simple tests which I have tried to analyze at: https://cirosantilli.com/javascript-memory-usage-benchmark But unlike languages without garbage collection like C++, it is very difficult to predict why memory usage is so overblown sometimes, especially when we have smaller numbers of objects. I'm not sure other garbage collected languages do any better though.

You have to run the program with:

node --expose-gc main.js

main.js

#!/usr/bin/env node

// CLI arguments.
let arr = false
let array_buffer = false
let dealloc = false
let klass = false
let obj = false
let n = 1000000
let objn = 0
for (let i = 2; i < process.argv.length; i++) {
  switch (process.argv[i]) {
    case 'arr':
      arr = true
    break
    case 'array-buffer':
      array_buffer = true
    break
    case 'class':
      klass = true
    break
    case 'dealloc':
      dealloc = true
    break
    case 'obj':
      obj = true
    break
    case 'n':
      i++
      n = parseInt(process.argv[i], 10)
    break
    case 'objn':
      i++
      objn = parseInt(process.argv[i], 10)
    break
    default:
      console.error(`unknown option: ${process.argv[i]}`);
    break
  }
}

class MyClass {
  constructor(a, b) {
    this.a = a
    this.b = b
  }
}

let a
if (array_buffer) {
  a = new Int32Array(new ArrayBuffer(n * 4))
  for (let i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    a[i] = i
  }
} else if (obj) {
  a = []
  for (let i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    a.push({ a: i, b: -i })
  }
} else if (objn) {
  a = []
  for (let i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    const obj = {}
    for (let j = 0; j < objn; j++) {
      obj[String.fromCharCode(65 + j)] = i
    }
    a.push(obj)
  }
} else if (klass) {
  a = []
  for (let i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    a.push({ a: i, b: -i })
  }
} else if (klass) {
  a = []
  for (let i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    a.push(new MyClass(i, -i))
  }
} else if (arr) {
  a = []
  for (let i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    a.push([i, -i])
  }
} else {
  a = []
  for (let i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    a.push(i)
  }
}

if (dealloc) {
  a = undefined
}

let j
while (true) {
  if (!dealloc) {
    j = 0
    // The collector somehow removes a if we don't reference it here.
    for (let i = 0; i < n; i++) {
      if (obj || klass) {
        j += a[i].a + a[i].b
      } else if (objn) {
        const obj = a[i]
        for (let k = 0; k < objn; k++) {
          j += obj[String.fromCharCode(65 + k)]
        }
      } else if (arr) {
        j += a[i][0] + a[i][1]
      } else {
        j += a[i]
      }
    }
    console.error(j)
  }
  global.gc()
  console.error(process.memoryUsage())
}

Some things we learn on Node 16 Ubuntu 21.10:

  • with node --expose-gc bench_mem.js n 1 we see that the minimum RSS is 30 MiB and the minimum heapUsed 3.7 MB. RSS for a C hello world on the same system is 770 kB for comparison

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.