144

How do I delete duplicates from a list without fooling around with a set? Is there something like list.distinct()? or list.unique()?

void main() {
  print("Hello, World!");

  List<String> list = ['abc',"abc",'def'];
  list.forEach((f) => print("this is list $f"));

  Set<String> set = new Set<String>.from(list);
  print("this is #0 ${list[0]}");
  set.forEach((f) => print("set: $f"));

  List<String> l2= new List<String>.from(set);
  l2.forEach((f) => print("This is new $f"));
}
Hello, World!
this is list abc
this is list abc
this is list def
this is #0 abc
set: abc
set: def
This is new abc
This is new def

Set seems to be way faster!! But it loses the order of the items :/

19 Answers 19

393

Use toSet and then toList

  var ids = [1, 4, 4, 4, 5, 6, 6];
  var distinctIds = ids.toSet().toList();

Result: [1, 4, 5, 6]

Or with spread operators:

var distinctIds = [...{...ids}];
10
  • 18
    Now this is the Dart way (short and powerful)! THank you.
    – xpeldev
    Feb 15, 2019 at 20:19
  • 4
    this is beautiful code-efficiency wise. Is it performance efficient as well? I will use this in a long for loop to avoid adding same elements.
    – aytunch
    Apr 10, 2019 at 21:43
  • 9
    Just keep in mind tho from the original docs 'The order of the elements in the set is not guaranteed to be the same' Jul 8, 2019 at 15:11
  • 1
    What doesn't work? var ids = ["abc", "def", "def"]; var distinctIds = ids.toSet().toList(); seems to remove the duplicate "def"
    – atreeon
    Jul 15, 2019 at 11:45
  • 3
    @AleksTi it does work for strings too and regarding the second point: well this is the point of the whole operation.
    – user6455909
    Apr 16, 2020 at 3:05
138

I didn't find any of the provided answers very helpful. Here is what I generally do:

final ids = Set();
myList.retainWhere((x) => ids.add(x.id));

Of course you can use any attribute which uniquely identifies your objects. It doesn't have to be an id field.

Benefits over other approaches:

  • Preserves the original order of the list
  • Works for rich objects not just primitives/hashable types
  • Doesn't have to copy the entire list to a set and back to a list

Update 09/12/21
You can also declare an extension method once for lists:

extension Unique<E, Id> on List<E> {
  List<E> unique([Id Function(E element)? id, bool inplace = true]) {
    final ids = Set();
    var list = inplace ? this : List<E>.from(this);
    list.retainWhere((x) => ids.add(id != null ? id(x) : x as Id));
    return list;
  }
}

This extension method does the same as my original answer. Usage:

// Use a lambda to map an object to its unique identifier.
myRichObjectList.unique((x) => x.id);
// Don't use a lambda for primitive/hashable types.
hashableValueList.unique();
8
  • 4
    That's only answer that works fine for List of Objects Thanks man Sep 3, 2020 at 20:38
  • Works for me when I needed to remove Map in List which has a specific value.
    – shinyatk
    Oct 2, 2020 at 9:48
  • Brilliant! Didn't know remove has that kind of utility. Thanks! Oct 6, 2020 at 8:59
  • 1
    Brilliant solution! I knew there had to be a way to use Sets to achieve this effect.
    – Ray Li
    Oct 12, 2020 at 22:59
  • 3
    This is the kind of solution I was looking for, thanks. However, I'm a bit puzzled: why use .remove() instead of .add()? It seems it would avoid to iterate the list twice: final ids = Set(); myList.retainWhere((x) => ids.add(x.id)).
    – Delgan
    Mar 20, 2021 at 12:57
45

Set works okay, but it doesn't preserve the order. Here's another way using LinkedHashSet:

import "dart:collection";

void main() {
  List<String> arr = ["a", "a", "b", "c", "b", "d"];
  List<String> result = LinkedHashSet<String>.from(arr).toList();
  print(result); // => ["a", "b", "c", "d"]
}

https://api.dart.dev/stable/2.4.0/dart-collection/LinkedHashSet/LinkedHashSet.from.html

1
  • 5
    Sets default implementation is a LinkedHashSet, so this changes nothing
    – PixelToast
    Nov 23, 2020 at 11:12
32

Try the following:

List<String> duplicates = ["a", "c", "a"];

duplicates = duplicates.toSet().toList();

Check this code on Dartpad.

3
  • this is pure solution with 3rd support
    – TeeTracker
    Jul 13, 2020 at 10:26
  • 2
    @TeeTracker: What do you mean by "3rd support"? Apr 22, 2021 at 23:40
  • Great - short and readable.
    – Kenneth N
    Apr 28 at 12:02
21

If you want to keep ordering or are dealing with more complex objects than primitive types, store seen ids to the Set and filter away those ones that are already in the set.

final list = ['a', 'a', 'b'];
final seen = Set<String>();
final unique = list.where((str) => seen.add(str)).toList();

print(unique); // => ['a', 'b']
4
  • Very nice uniqueness maker if one deals with more complex lists. Thank you very much !
    – iKK
    Jan 6, 2020 at 7:48
  • This is the only one that worked when having a list of objects and needing unique by id. Thank you Jan 31, 2021 at 23:20
  • Wouldn't be 'forEach' better than 'where'? 'where' is used for filtering (and should return bool):
    – Piotr Temp
    Mar 26, 2021 at 11:18
  • This is the simplest, cleanest looking to me. Also, from the documentation, where returns a new lazy iterable... : Iterable<String> where(bool Function(String) test) Returns a new lazy Iterable with all elements that satisfy the predicate test.
    – RobbB
    Dec 29, 2021 at 2:43
15

//This easy way works fine

List<String> myArray = [];
myArray = ['x', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'o', 'x', 'y', 'y', 'r', 'a'];

myArray = myArray.toSet().toList();

print(myArray);

// result => myArray =['x','w','y','o','r', 'a']

14

I am adding this to atreeon's answer. For anyone that want use this with Object:

class MyObject{
  int id;

  MyObject(this.id);


  @override
  bool operator ==(Object other) {
    return other != null && other is MyObject && hashCode == other.hashCode;
  }


  @override
  int get hashCode => id;
}

main(){
   List<MyObject> list = [MyObject(1),MyObject(2),MyObject(1)];

   // The new list will be [MyObject(1),MyObject(2)]
   List<MyObject> newList = list.toSet().toList();
}
0
11

Using Dart 2.3+, you can use the spread operators to do this:

final ids = [1, 4, 4, 4, 5, 6, 6];
final distinctIds = [...{...ids}];

Whether this is more or less readable than ids.toSet().toList() I'll let the reader decide :)

9

For distinct list of objects you can use Equatable package.

Example:

// ignore: must_be_immutable
class User extends Equatable {
  int id;
  String name;

  User({this.id, this.name});

  @override
  List<Object> get props => [id];
}

List<User> items = [
  User(
    id: 1,
    name: "Omid",
  ),
  User(
    id: 2,
    name: "Raha",
  ),
  User(
    id: 1,
    name: "Omid",
  ),
  User(
    id: 2,
    name: "Raha",
  ),
];

print(items.toSet().toList());

Output:

[User(1), User(2)]
6

Here it is, a working solution:

var sampleList = ['1', '2', '3', '3', '4', '4'];
//print('original: $sampleList');
sampleList = Set.of(sampleList).toList();
//print('processed: $sampleList');

Output:

original: [1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4]
processed: [1, 2, 3, 4]
0
6

Using the fast_immutable_collections package:

[1, 2, 3, 2].distinct();

Or

[1, 2, 3, 2].removeDuplicates().toList();

Note: While distinct() returns a new list, removeDuplicates() does it lazily by returning an Iterable. This means it is much more efficient when you are doing some extra processing. For example, suppose you have a list with a million items, and you want to remove duplicates and get the first five:

// This will process five items:
List<String> newList = list.removeDuplicates().take(5).toList();

// This will process a million items:
List<String> newList = list.distinct().sublist(0, 5);

// This will also process a million items:
List<String> newList = [...{...list}].sublist(0, 5);

Both methods also accept a by parameter. For example:

// Returns ["a", "yk", "xyz"]
["a", "yk", "xyz", "b", "xm"].removeDuplicates(by: (item) => item.length);

If you don't want to include a package into your project but needs the lazy code, here it is a simplified removeDuplicates():

Iterable<T> removeDuplicates<T>(Iterable<T> iterable) sync* {
  Set<T> items = {};
  for (T item in iterable) {
    if (!items.contains(item)) yield item;
    items.add(item);
  }
}

Note: I am one of the authors of the fast_immutable_collections package.

5
void uniqifyList(List<Dynamic> list) {
  for (int i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
    Dynamic o = list[i];
    int index;
    // Remove duplicates
    do {
      index = list.indexOf(o, i+1);
      if (index != -1) {
        list.removeRange(index, 1);
      }
    } while (index != -1);
  }
}

void main() {
  List<String> list = ['abc', "abc", 'def'];
  print('$list');
  uniqifyList(list);
  print('$list');
}

Gives output:

[abc, abc, def]
[abc, def]
5

Remove duplicates from a list of objects:

class Stock {
  String? documentID; //key
  Make? make;
  Model? model;
  String? year;

  Stock({
    this.documentID,
    this.make,
    this.model,
    this.year,
  });
}

List of stock, from where we want to remove duplicate stocks

List<Stock> stockList = [stock1, stock2, stock3];

Remove duplicates

final ids = stockList.map((e) => e.documentID).toSet();
stockList.retainWhere((x) => ids.remove(x.documentID));
1

As for me, one of the best practices is sort the array, and then deduplicate it. The idea is stolen from low-level languages. So, first make the sort by your own, and then deduplicate equal values that are going after each other.

// Easy example
void dedup<T>(List<T> list, {removeLast: true}) {
  int shift = removeLast ? 1 : 0;
  T compareItem;
  for (int i = list.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    if (compareItem == (compareItem = list[i])) {
      list.removeAt(i + shift);
    }
  }
}

// Harder example
void dedupBy<T, I>(List<T> list, I Function(T) compare, {removeLast: true}) {
  int shift = removeLast ? 1 : 0;
  I compareItem;
  for (int i = list.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    if (compareItem == (compareItem = compare(list[i]))) {
      list.removeAt(i + shift);
    }
  }
}


void main() {
  List<List<int>> list = [[1], [1], [2, 1], [2, 2]];
  print('$list');
  dedupBy(list, (innerList) => innerList[0]);
  print('$list');

  print('\n removeLast: false');

  List<List<int>> list2 = [[1], [1], [2, 1], [2, 2]];
  print('$list2');
  dedupBy(list2, (innerList) => innerList[0], removeLast: false);
  print('$list2');
}

Output:

[[1], [1], [2, 1], [2, 2]]
[[1], [2, 1]]

removeLast: false
[[1], [1], [2, 1], [2, 2]]
[[1], [2, 2]]
1

This is another way...

final reducedList = [];

list.reduce((value, element) {
    if (value != element) 
        reducedList.add(value);
    return element;
});

reducedList.add(list.last);

print(reducedList);
0
List<Model> bigList = [];
List<ModelNew> newList = [];  

for (var element in bigList) {
      var list = newList.where((i) => i.type == element.type).toList();
      if(list.isEmpty){
       newList.add(element);
      }
    }
2
  • 1
    There are 17 existing answers to this question, including a top-voted, accepted answer with over three hundred votes. Are you certain your solution hasn't already been given? If not, why do you believe your approach improves upon the existing proposals, which have been validated by the community? Offering an explanation is always useful on Stack Overflow, but it's especially important where the question has been resolved to the satisfaction of both the OP and the community. Help readers out by explaining what your answer does different and when it might be preferred. Mar 7 at 0:15
  • Please read "How to Answer". It helps more if you supply an explanation why this is the preferred solution and explain how it works. We want to educate, not just provide code. Mar 11 at 5:54
-1

This is my solution

    List<T> removeDuplicates<T>(List<T> list, IsEqual isEqual) {
      List<T> output = [];
      for(var i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
        bool found = false;
        for(var j = 0; j < output.length; j++) {
          if (isEqual(list[i], output[j])) {
            found = true;
          }
        }
        if (found) {
          output.add(list[i]);
        }
      }

      return output;
    }

Use it like this:

  var theList = removeDuplicates(myOriginalList, (item1, item2) => item1.documentID == item2.documentID);

or...

  var theList = removeDuplicates(myOriginalList, (item1, item2) => item1.equals(item2));

or...

-1

It works for me.

var list = [
 {"id": 1, "name": "Joshua"},
 {"id": 2, "name": "Joshua"},
 {"id": 3, "name": "Shinta"},
 {"id": 4, "name": "Shinta"},
 {"id": 5, "name": "Zaidan"}
];
list.removeWhere((element) => element.name == element.name.codeUnitAt(1));
list.sort((a, b) => a.name.compareTo(b.name));

Output:

[{"id": 1, "name": "Joshua"}, 
{"id": 3, "name": "Shinta"}, 
{"id": 5, "name": "Zaidan"}]
1
  • Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Dec 9, 2021 at 1:47
-10

I have a library called Reactive-Dart that contains many composable operators for terminating and non-terminating sequences. For your scenario it would look something like this:

final newList = [];
Observable
   .fromList(['abc', 'abc', 'def'])
   .distinct()
   .observe((next) => newList.add(next), () => print(newList));

Yielding:

[abc, def]

I should add that there are other libraries out there with similar features. Check around on GitHub and I'm sure you'll find something suitable.

0

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