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Outlook by default transforms ":)" into "J". Googling has revealed that J is the Wingdings character for the smilie, so they appear like normal smilies to Outlook users.

I want to transform these "J" smilies into the UTF-8 smiley characters so the rest of us can see them too. But when looking at the source of an email, the "J" smilie lines look like this:

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">J<o:p></o:p></span></p>

That is, just like normal Outlook formatting that you see on every other line. No font-family other than Calibri and Times New Roman is even mentioned anywhere in the source. So just how is Outlook decoding these J's back into smilies? How do I?

<html xmlns:v="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns:m="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/2004/12/omml" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
<meta name="Generator" content="Microsoft Word 14 (filtered medium)">
<!--[if !mso]><style>v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
.shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
</style><![endif]--><style><!--
/* Font Definitions */
@font-face
    {font-family:Calibri;
    panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}
@font-face
    {font-family:Tahoma;
    panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
    {margin:0cm;
    margin-bottom:.0001pt;
    font-size:12.0pt;
    font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
    {mso-style-priority:99;
    color:blue;
    text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
    {mso-style-priority:99;
    color:purple;
    text-decoration:underline;}
p.MsoAcetate, li.MsoAcetate, div.MsoAcetate
    {mso-style-priority:99;
    mso-style-link:"Balloon Text Char";
    margin:0cm;
    margin-bottom:.0001pt;
    font-size:8.0pt;
    font-family:"Tahoma","sans-serif";}
span.dp-replycode
    {mso-style-name:dp-replycode;}
span.EmailStyle18
    {mso-style-type:personal-reply;
    font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
    color:#1F497D;}
span.BalloonTextChar
    {mso-style-name:"Balloon Text Char";
    mso-style-priority:99;
    mso-style-link:"Balloon Text";
    font-family:"Tahoma","sans-serif";}
.MsoChpDefault
    {mso-style-type:export-only;
    font-size:10.0pt;}
@page WordSection1
    {size:612.0pt 792.0pt;
    margin:72.0pt 72.0pt 72.0pt 72.0pt;}
div.WordSection1
    {page:WordSection1;}
--></style><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapedefaults v:ext="edit" spidmax="1026" />
</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapelayout v:ext="edit">
<o:idmap v:ext="edit" data="1" />
</o:shapelayout></xml><![endif]-->
</head>
<body lang="EN-GB" link="blue" vlink="purple">
<div class="WordSection1">
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">Some message
<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D">J<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1F497D"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<div>
....
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  • 1
    hmm ... my Outlook generates this <p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-family:Wingdings'>J</span></p> is it possible, that the html you have posted in your question was altered by your receiving eMail client?
    – Hinek
    Aug 20, 2012 at 14:37
  • For those using Thunderbird to read emails written in 'Lookout' ;), I just found this add-on which 'fixes' this problem on the receiving side: addons.mozilla.org/en-US/thunderbird/addon/smiley-fixer
    – Lambart
    Sep 27, 2013 at 17:20

1 Answer 1

0

I'm just an idiot. I was using client data as a source of Outlook emails since I didn't readily have an Outlook client available. After setting it up and testing for myself, the family:Wingdings is indeed in the source. Turns out the client was just signing his emails with "J"!

Now it's simple enough looking for font-family:Wingdings and converting them into UTF-8 smilies.

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