129

In Chrome for Mac, one can "overscroll" a page (for lack of a better word), as shown in the screenshot below, to see "what's behind", similar to the iPad or iPhone.

I've noticed that some pages have it disabled, like gmail and the "new tab" page.

How can I disable "overscrolling"? Are there other ways in which I can control "overscrolling"?

enter image description here

2
  • 2
    I'm actually trying to enable it on the newtab page, for example. Trying to understand the issues involved here.
    – Randomblue
    Aug 20, 2012 at 22:58
  • I don't think there is a way to do that. It's a simple matter of having the page be long enough to allow the scroller to start. Also, consider changing the title of your post to what you would like to achieve instead of the opposite. Aug 20, 2012 at 23:00

8 Answers 8

182

The accepted solution was not working for me. The only way I got it working while still being able to scroll is:

html {
    overflow: hidden;
    height: 100%;
}

body {
    height: 100%;
    overflow: auto;
}
14
  • 2
    This solution is problematic for both devices that don't respect the html styling hack and for mobile web browsers which look at the full overflow of body disregarding the height to which html was set.
    – runspired
    Jul 7, 2015 at 19:46
  • 5
    This solution doesn't work as of Chrome 46 for Mac. It prevents over-scrolling but none of the child elements are scrollable. Oct 31, 2015 at 17:01
  • 1
    Then, how can you get the scrollTop value that you'd usually get with $(window).scrollTop ?
    – Guig
    Apr 20, 2016 at 19:37
  • 2
    Neither solution works for me on Chrome 49 for mac or Firefox 44 for mac. window.scrollY is always 0.
    – momo
    Apr 22, 2016 at 21:40
  • 4
    Works for Chrome, but not Safari. Aug 3, 2016 at 21:47
99

In Chrome 63+, Firefox 59+ and Opera 50+ you can do this in CSS:

body {
  overscroll-behavior-y: none;
}

This disables the rubberbanding effect on iOS shown in the screenshot of the question. It however also disables pull-to-refresh, glow effects and scroll chaining.

You can however elect to implement your own effect or functionality upon over-scrolling. If you for instance want to blur the page and add a neat animation:

<style>
  body.refreshing #inbox {
    filter: blur(1px);
    touch-action: none; /* prevent scrolling */
  }
  body.refreshing .refresher {
    transform: translate3d(0,150%,0) scale(1);
    z-index: 1;
  }
  .refresher {
    --refresh-width: 55px;
    pointer-events: none;
    width: var(--refresh-width);
    height: var(--refresh-width);
    border-radius: 50%; 
    position: absolute;
    transition: all 300ms cubic-bezier(0,0,0.2,1);
    will-change: transform, opacity;
    ...
  }
</style>

<div class="refresher">
  <div class="loading-bar"></div>
  <div class="loading-bar"></div>
  <div class="loading-bar"></div>
  <div class="loading-bar"></div>
</div>

<section id="inbox"><!-- msgs --></section>

<script>
  let _startY;
  const inbox = document.querySelector('#inbox');

  inbox.addEventListener('touchstart', e => {
    _startY = e.touches[0].pageY;
  }, {passive: true});

  inbox.addEventListener('touchmove', e => {
    const y = e.touches[0].pageY;
    // Activate custom pull-to-refresh effects when at the top of the container
    // and user is scrolling up.
    if (document.scrollingElement.scrollTop === 0 && y > _startY &&
        !document.body.classList.contains('refreshing')) {
      // refresh inbox.
    }
  }, {passive: true});
</script>

Browser Support

As of this writing Chrome 63+, Firefox 59+ and Opera 50+ support it. Edge publically supported it while Safari is an unknown. Track progress here and current browser compatibility at MDN documentation

More information

3
  • 6
    This is the best solution, in my opinion. And simple. The one with all the upvotes can be problematic.
    – TheTC
    Nov 21, 2019 at 18:51
  • 1
    any other solution for edge browser users?
    – YTG
    Sep 22, 2020 at 19:04
  • 1
    @YTG This property has worked bug-free in Edge as well since version 79 when it got converted to use Chromium under-the-hood. The property also somewhat worked in the prior version, 18 but through a bug. Alternatively the other solution not using overscroll-behaviour-y property should work in earlier versions of Edge than those. 18 and in particular 79+ do however seem to cover most Edge users. See more about browser support here: caniuse.com/css-overscroll-behavior. The MDN link appears to currently be slightly out-of-date in regards to Edge support.
    – Koslun
    Sep 23, 2020 at 16:12
40

One way you can prevent this, is using the following CSS:

html, body {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    overflow: hidden;
}

body > div {
    height: 100%;
    overflow: scroll;
    -webkit-overflow-scrolling: touch;
}

This way the body has never any overflow and won't "bounce" when scrolling at the top and bottom of the page. The container will perfectly scroll its content within. This works in Safari and in Chrome.

Edit

Why the extra <div>-element as a wrapper could be useful:
Florian Feldhaus' solution uses slightly less code and works fine too. However, it can have a little quirk, when it comes to content that exceeds the viewport width. In this case the scrollbar at the bottom of the window is moved out of the viewport half way and is hard to recognize/reach. This can be avoided using body { margin: 0; } if suitable. In situation where you can't add this CSS the wrapper element is useful as the scrollbar is always fully visible.

Find a screenshot below: enter image description here

7
  • 3
    If this worked once, it no longer works. In my Chrome v37, the overscoll behaviour will happen wherever an element scrolls.
    – bbsimonbb
    Oct 31, 2014 at 8:30
  • @user1585345 I've tested this right now in Chrome 38 again on OS X and it still works (also in Safari). Here's the file I'm using. Can you test it with this file? Direct link to the file on sendspace.com. Oct 31, 2014 at 11:16
  • 1
    I've tested with the above file, and I still have the bounce. I suspect we will not get to the bottom of this mystery. Chrome 37
    – bbsimonbb
    Nov 3, 2014 at 11:01
  • You shouldn't need the extra wrapper div. Check the below answer for a better solution.
    – JayD3e
    Mar 24, 2015 at 14:12
  • 1
    This solution doesn't work as of Chrome 46 for Mac. It prevents over-scrolling but none of the child elements are scrollable. Oct 31, 2015 at 17:02
2

Try this way

body {
    height: 100vh;
    background-size: cover;
    overflow: hidden;
}
2

You can use this code to remove touchmove predefined action:

document.body.addEventListener('touchmove', function(event) {
  console.log(event.source);
  //if (event.source == document.body)
    event.preventDefault();
}, false);
1
html,body {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}
body {
    position: fixed;
    overflow: hidden;
}
3
  • 4
    While this may answer the question, it is better to explain the essential parts of the answer and possibly what was the problem with OPs code.
    – pirho
    Dec 10, 2017 at 18:45
  • Your answer was flagged because of its length and content. I suggest revising. Perhaps add additional details.
    – www139
    Dec 10, 2017 at 22:28
  • 1
    position: fixed is the saviour! Sep 17, 2018 at 13:05
0

position: absolute works for me. I've tested on Chrome 50.0.2661.75 (64-bit) and OSX.

body {
  overflow: hidden;
}

// position is important
#element {
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  right: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  overflow: auto;
}
0

Bounce effect cannot be disabled except the height of webpage equals to window.innerHeight, you can let your sub-elements scroll.

html {
    overflow: hidden;
}

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