87

Is there a way using Jackson JSON Processor to do custom field level serialization? For example, I'd like to have the class

public class Person {
    public String name;
    public int age;
    public int favoriteNumber;
}

serialized to the follow JSON:

{ "name": "Joe", "age": 25, "favoriteNumber": "123" }

Note that age=25 is encoded as a number while favoriteNumber=123 is encoded as a string. Out of the box Jackson marshalls int to a number. In this case I want favoriteNumber to be encoded as a string.

97

You can implement a custom serializer as follows:

public class Person {
    public String name;
    public int age;
    @JsonSerialize(using = IntToStringSerializer.class, as=String.class)
    public int favoriteNumber:
}


public class IntToStringSerializer extends JsonSerializer<Integer> {

    @Override
    public void serialize(Integer tmpInt, 
                          JsonGenerator jsonGenerator, 
                          SerializerProvider serializerProvider) 
                          throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
        jsonGenerator.writeObject(tmpInt.toString());
    }
}

Java should handle the autoboxing from int to Integer for you.

52

Jackson-databind (at least 2.1.3) provides special ToStringSerializer (com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ser.std.ToStringSerializer)

Example:

public class Person {
    public String name;
    public int age;
    @JsonSerialize(using = ToStringSerializer.class)
    public int favoriteNumber:
}
  • 3
    What about the reverse where a String needs to be converted to an int? I don't see ToIntSerializer.class. – jEremyB Sep 17 '15 at 19:00
  • @jEremyB You might have to write a custom deserializer – Drew Stephens Apr 11 '17 at 12:40
  • ToStringSerializer works but FloatSerializer brings this message: Could not write content: java.lang.Integer cannot be cast to java.lang.Float – Arnie Schwarzvogel May 19 '18 at 14:54
11

Add a @JsonProperty annotated getter, which returns a String, for the favoriteNumber field:

public class Person {
    public String name;
    public int age;
    private int favoriteNumber;

    public Person(String name, int age, int favoriteNumber) {
        this.name = name;
        this.age = age;
        this.favoriteNumber = favoriteNumber;
    }

    @JsonProperty
    public String getFavoriteNumber() {
        return String.valueOf(favoriteNumber);
    }

    public static void main(String... args) throws Exception {
        Person p = new Person("Joe", 25, 123);
        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        System.out.println(mapper.writeValueAsString(p)); 
        // {"name":"Joe","age":25,"favoriteNumber":"123"}
    }
}
10

jackson-annotations provides @JsonFormat which can handle a lot of customizations without the need to write the custom serializer.

For example, requesting a STRING shape for a field with numeric type will output the numeric value as string

public class Person {
    public String name;
    public int age;
    @JsonFormat(shape = JsonFormat.Shape.STRING)
    public int favoriteNumber;
}

will result in the desired output

{"name":"Joe","age":25,"favoriteNumber":"123"}
2

with the help of @JsonView we can decide fields of model classes to serialize which satisfy the minimal criteria ( we have to define the criteria) like we can have one core class with 10 properties but only 5 properties can be serialize which are needful for client only

Define our Views by simply creating following class:

public class Views
{
    static class Android{};
    static class IOS{};
    static class Web{};
}

Annotated model class with views:

public class Demo 
{
    public Demo() 
    {
    }

@JsonView(Views.IOS.class)
private String iosField;

@JsonView(Views.Android.class)
private String androidField;

@JsonView(Views.Web.class)
private String webField;

 // getters/setters
...
..
}

Now we have to write custom json converter by simply extending HttpMessageConverter class from spring as:

    public class CustomJacksonConverter implements HttpMessageConverter<Object> 
    {
    public CustomJacksonConverter() 
        {
            super();
        //this.delegate.getObjectMapper().setConfig(this.delegate.getObjectMapper().getSerializationConfig().withView(Views.ClientView.class));
        this.delegate.getObjectMapper().configure(MapperFeature.DEFAULT_VIEW_INCLUSION, true);
        this.delegate.getObjectMapper().setSerializationInclusion(Include.NON_NULL);

    }

    // a real message converter that will respond to methods and do the actual work
    private MappingJackson2HttpMessageConverter delegate = new MappingJackson2HttpMessageConverter();

    @Override
    public boolean canRead(Class<?> clazz, MediaType mediaType) {
        return delegate.canRead(clazz, mediaType);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean canWrite(Class<?> clazz, MediaType mediaType) {
        return delegate.canWrite(clazz, mediaType);
    }

    @Override
    public List<MediaType> getSupportedMediaTypes() {
        return delegate.getSupportedMediaTypes();
    }

    @Override
    public Object read(Class<? extends Object> clazz,
            HttpInputMessage inputMessage) throws IOException,
            HttpMessageNotReadableException {
        return delegate.read(clazz, inputMessage);
    }

    @Override
    public void write(Object obj, MediaType contentType, HttpOutputMessage outputMessage) throws IOException, HttpMessageNotWritableException 
    {
        synchronized(this) 
        {
            String userAgent = ((ServletRequestAttributes) RequestContextHolder.getRequestAttributes()).getRequest().getHeader("userAgent");
            if ( userAgent != null ) 
            {
                switch (userAgent) 
                {
                case "IOS" :
                    this.delegate.getObjectMapper().setConfig(this.delegate.getObjectMapper().getSerializationConfig().withView(Views.IOS.class));
                    break;
                case "Android" :
                    this.delegate.getObjectMapper().setConfig(this.delegate.getObjectMapper().getSerializationConfig().withView(Views.Android.class));
                    break;
                case "Web" :
                    this.delegate.getObjectMapper().setConfig(this.delegate.getObjectMapper().getSerializationConfig().withView( Views.Web.class));
                    break;
                default:
                    this.delegate.getObjectMapper().setConfig(this.delegate.getObjectMapper().getSerializationConfig().withView( null ));
                    break;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                // reset to default view
                this.delegate.getObjectMapper().setConfig(this.delegate.getObjectMapper().getSerializationConfig().withView( null ));
            }
            delegate.write(obj, contentType, outputMessage);
        }
    }

}

Now there is need to tell spring to use this custom json convert by simply putting this in dispatcher-servlet.xml

<mvc:annotation-driven>
        <mvc:message-converters register-defaults="true">
            <bean id="jsonConverter" class="com.mactores.org.CustomJacksonConverter" >
            </bean>
        </mvc:message-converters>
    </mvc:annotation-driven>

That's how you will able to decide which fields to get serialize.

1

In case you don't want to pollute your model with annotations and want to perform some custom operations, you could use mixins.

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
SimpleModule simpleModule = new SimpleModule();
simpleModule.setMixInAnnotation(Person.class, PersonMixin.class);
mapper.registerModule(simpleModule);

Override age:

public abstract class PersonMixin {
    @JsonSerialize(using = PersonAgeSerializer.class)
    public String age;
}

Do whatever you need with the age:

public class PersonAgeSerializer extends JsonSerializer<Integer> {
    @Override
    public void serialize(Integer integer, JsonGenerator jsonGenerator, SerializerProvider serializerProvider) throws IOException {
        jsonGenerator.writeString(String.valueOf(integer * 52) + " months");
    }
}

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