8

Creating an object called car:

function car(temp){

    this.brand=temp[0];
    this.color=temp[1];
    this.year=temp[2];
}

var temp = ['Skoda', 'Red', '2012'];
car = new car(temp);
  1. Setting object and stringify after reading from localStorage:

    localStorage.setItem('car',car);
    car = localStorage.getItem('car');
    car = JSON.stringify(car);
    

    car after stringify-----------------> [object Object] at file:///android_asset/www/...

  2. Stringify object and Setting object to localStorage after it: localStorage.setItem('car',JSON.stringify(car)); car = localStorage.getItem('car');

car after stringify-----------------> "{\"brand\":\"Skoda\",\"color\":\"Red\",\"year\":\"2012\"}" at file:///android_asset/www/...

Question 1: Why does it make difference what is the order when you stringify the object?

Question 2: Why can't I use stringified object like that:

08-21 11:49:14.860: I/Web Console(9642): car after stringify----------------->     {"brand":"Skoda","color":"Red","year":"2012"}

console.log("car.brand----->" +car.brand); car.name----->undefined

17

From my understanding you can't use your stringified object once it's been stringified because it's no longer an object. It's a String.

So when you try to do car.brand on the string there is no property brand.

Personally, good practice in my opinion would be to do.

 function car(temp){
     this.brand=temp[0];
     this.color=temp[1];
     this.year=temp[2];
 }

 var temp = ['Skoda', 'Red', '2012'];
 car = new car(temp);

 localStorage.setItem('car',JSON.stringify(car)); 
 car = localStorage.getItem('car');
 car = JSON.parse(car);

This means the car object is now not a string but an object.

When doing this also write to local storage using stringify and read using parse.

10

You can't store JavaScript object is localStorage, see this question.

So use your second option. First stringify the object the store it. And later pick it up and parse it to a javascript object.

localStorage.setItem('car',JSON.stringify(car));
carString = localStorage.getItem('car');
car = JSON.parse(carString);
console.log(car.brand); // Skoda
0

I was facing this same issue recently. Check out this script I wrote.
https://github.com/andresgallo/truStorage

It allows storage and retrieval of objects inside local storage. It will return objects as objects automatically if need be. The other thing is you also set and get items in a nested object. Best part of it all is that its a tiny script.

0

The latest browsers now support localStorage as objects natively. I have tested this with Chrome v44 and Firefox v34:

localStorage
Storage {debug: "undefined", uid: "3", length: 2} 

typeof localStorage
"object"

So from now on. You'll be alright.

  • Actually, localStorage itself is an object (that's what your example above shows), but it still only stores your data as strings. You might be thinking of Chrome's own storage API, chrome.storage, which is the same as localStorage, but with some extensions, including the ability to store objects natively: developer.chrome.com/extensions/storage (and likely Firefox has something similar, though I haven't checked.) – seanTcoyote Dec 7 '16 at 18:15

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