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I want to create a single executable from my Python project. A user should be able to download and run it without needing Python installed. If I were just distributing a package, I could use pip, wheel, and PyPI to build and distribute it, but this requires that the user has Python and knows how to install packages. What can I use to build a self-contained executable from a Python project?

  • I am still writing in 2.x(2.7.2 to be exact), but might see the need to transfer to 3.x(if modules and such are compatible) and would need a solution then too. – ShadowFlame Aug 21 '12 at 16:51
  • Note that packaging will complicate problem diagnostics greatly. Not only you (or pdb) don't have easy access to the files being executed, py2exe (dunno about the others) doesn't include .py files so you won't see source lines in stack traces. – ivan_pozdeev Jan 16 '15 at 17:08
  • Just as a point of interest, I've started using pyinstaller – ShadowFlame May 15 '18 at 6:16
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Here are some common ones. Unless explicitly noted, all projects listed below are being actively maintained as of my last edit (August 2018).

I've also included links to their respective websites, repos, and PyPi listings in case you want to check for yourself on how frequently they've been updated.

Also, unless otherwise noted, all programs listed below will produce an exe specifically for the operating system it's running in. So for example, running Pyinstaller in Windows will produce a Windows exe, but running Pyinstaller in Linux will produce a Linux exe. If you want to produce an exe for multiple operating systems, you will have to look into using virtual machines or look into using something like Wine.


The following programs all work similarly -- they bundle together Python and your program, effectively combining them to produce an executable.

  • PyInstaller:

    • Links: Website || Repo || PyPi
    • Supports: Python 2.7 and Python 3.4 - 3.7 on Windows, Mac, and Linux.
  • cx_Freeze:

    • Links: Website || Repo || PyPi
    • Supports: Python 2.7 and 3.5 - 3.7 (?) on Windows, Mac, and Linux.
  • pyapp:

    • Links: Website || Repo || PyPi
    • Supports: Python 2.7 and 3.3 (?) - 3.7 (?) on Mac only.
    • Note: As of my last edit, I've been unable to conclusively determine the exact range of Python versions supported by pyapp. The latest release mentions supporting Python 3.7.

Note: prior versions of this post included write-ups for py2exe (repo) and bbfreeze (repo). Both projects have been removed from this list: they've seen little-to-no activity for several years and appear to be completely unmaintained. See edit history for the old writeups.


Of course, that's not the only way of doing things:

  • pynsist:

    • Links: Website || Repo || PyPi
    • Supports: All Python versions? Note -- will create Windows installers only.
    • Other notes: Pynsist seems to support bundling together any arbitrary Python version with your application. However, the tool itself requires Python 3.5+ to run.

      Pynsist will create a Windows installer for your program which will directly install Python on the user's computer instead of bundling it with your code and create shortcuts that link to your Python script. Although this program produces only Windows installers, it appears that you can still run Pynsist on Mac and Linux computers.

  • Nuitka:

    • Links: Website || Repo (Github mirror) || PyPi
    • Supports: Python 2.6 - 2.7 and Python 3.3 - 3.7 on Windows, Mac, and Linux.
    • Other notes: Nuitka will literally compile your Python code and produce an exe (as opposed to the other projects, which simply include Python) to try and speed up your code. As a side effect, you'll also get a handy exe you can distribute. Note that you need to have a C++ compiler available on your system.
  • cython:

    • Links: Website || Repo || PyPi
    • Supports: Python 2.6 - 2.7 and Python 3.2 - 3.7 (?) on Windows, Mac, and Linux.
    • Other notes: Cython is similar to Nuitka in that it is a Python compiler. However, instead of directly compiling your code, it'll compile it to C. You can then take that C code and turn your code into an exe. You'll need to have a C compiler available on your system.

My personal preference is to use PyInstaller since it was the easiest for me to get up and running, was designed to work nicely with various popular libraries such as numpy or pygame, and has great compatibility with various OSes and Python versions.

However, I've also successfully built various exes using cx_Freeze without too much difficulty, so you should also consider that program out.

I haven't yet had a chance to to try pynist, Nuitka, or Cython extensively, but they seem like pretty interesting and innovative solutions. If you run into trouble using the first group of programs, it might be worthwhile to try one of these three. Since they work fundamentally differently then the Pyinstaller/cx_freeze-style programs, they might succeed in those odd edge cases where the first group fails.

In particular, I think pynist is a good way of sidestepping the entire issue of distributing your code altogether: Macs and Linux already have native support for Python, and just installing Python on Windows might genuinely be the cleanest solution. (The downside is now that you need to worry about targeting multiple versions of Python + installing libraries).

Nuitka and Cython (in my limited experience) seem to work fairly well. Again, I haven't tested them extensively myself, and so my main observation is that they seem to take much longer to produce an exe then the "freeze" style programs do.

As a final note, if you want to support Linux only, you may want to look into creating a distro package for your package, instead of turning it into an executable. Listing tools that can help you do this is beyond the scope of this post, but here's some reading material if you decide to explore this route.

  • 1
    by the way, there is also shedskin – Tobias Kienzler Aug 15 '14 at 7:25
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    Note that you also need to include inside your bundle the Microsoft C++ Redistributables (aka msvcrxx.dll, where xx is a version number) to make the .exe run (or ask users to install it by themselves). This is necessary because Python is built on Windows using Visual Studio. – gaborous Oct 21 '15 at 18:40
  • So it looks like none of the python IDE's (pycharm or pydev - eclipse pluggin) have yet to incorporate the compile-to-single-executable functionality into the IDE itself. Is that correct? :-) – Nelda.techspiress Oct 26 '16 at 16:32
  • If you care about keeping safe your source code, probably Cython is the best choice because it compiles C code. Those programs that use freezing technique generally can be easily decompiled. – Martín De la Fuente Apr 30 '17 at 19:06
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    @Tom -- After doing a little bit more digging, it looks like while pyinstaller itself does support Python 3.7, they haven't officially released a new version with 3.7 support. (E.g. their github repo states that they support Python 3.7 + they appear to have no open issues left related to 3.7, but the latest version of pyinstaller on PyPi is from Dec 2017). So if you need 3.7 support, you could try building + installing pyinstaller directly from source, or wait until the next release. (Or use another program, of course) – Michael0x2a Aug 23 '18 at 7:24
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pyinstaller is still under active development. You can see the latest changes on GitHub.

It has support for all three major platforms:

  • Windows (32-bit and 64-bit)
  • Linux (32-bit and 64-bit)
  • Mac OS X (32-bit and 64-bit)

and it supports Python versions 2.6 and 2.7. It does not support Python 3, but there is an experimental Python 3 branch.

Update

As of version 3.2.1 it supports Python 2.7, 3.3-3.5

protected by davidism Oct 21 '15 at 18:52

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