169

As you can see in the CSS below, I want child2 to position itself before child1. This is because the site I'm currently developing should also work on mobile devices, on which the child2 should be at the bottom, as it contains the navigation which I want below the content on the mobile devices. - Why not 2 masterpages? This is the only 2 divs which are repositioned in the entire HTML, so 2 masterpages for this minor change is an overkill.

HTML:

<div id="parent">
    <div class="child1"></div>
    <div class="child2"></div>
</div>

CSS:

parent { position: relative; width: 100%; }
child1 { width: auto; margin-left: 160px; }
child2 { width: 145px; position: absolute; top: 0px; bottom: 0px; }

child2 has dynamic height, as different subsites could have more or less navigation items.

I know that absolute positioned elements are removed from the flow, thus ignored by other elements.
I tried setting overflow:hidden; on the parent div, but that didn't help, neither does the clearfix.

My last resort will be javascript to reposition the two divs accordingly, but for now I'll try and see if there exist a non-javascript way of doing this.

  • 3
    show us a demo at jsfiddle.net – blasteralfred Ψ Aug 22 '12 at 10:11
  • 2
    I'm not 100% sure but I think you'll probably have to go for a JS solution which works out the height of child2 and moves child1 accordingly. – Billy Moat Aug 22 '12 at 10:11
  • 1
    This can be done by setting the parent's position to relative and the child to absolute. – fungusanthrax Apr 19 '17 at 20:26
  • See this Workaround maybe it can help. – BBeta Sep 18 '17 at 14:11

14 Answers 14

136

You answered the question by yourself: "I know that absolute positioned elements are removed from the flow, thus ignored by other elements." So you can't set the parents height according to an absolutely positioned element.

You either use fixed heights or you need to involve JS.

  • 11
    Do you have a link to the solution you found? I am having the same problem @DanielZiga – Pierce McGeough Nov 28 '13 at 14:15
  • 3
    oh god another css block.. i want element to remain at bottom but also expand the parent when it's clicked and shows more information. – Muhammad Umer Jul 7 '15 at 19:33
  • 1
    How do we use JS to accomplish this? – Josh Grinberg Jun 6 '16 at 15:00
  • 1
    @JoshGrinberg You can find a lot of JS snippets and jQuery plugins to set elements to an equal height. There are also complete libraries, that allow to modify the display, height and position of multiple elements. – feeela Jun 7 '16 at 9:40
  • 4
    @JoshGrinberg , if you are using jQuery: $('.parent').height($('.child').outerHeight()); – Ran Galili Mar 29 '17 at 10:44
12

Although stretching to elements with position: absolute is not possible, there are often solutions where you can avoid the absolute positioning while obtaining the same effect. Look at this fiddle that solves the problem in your particular case http://jsfiddle.net/gS9q7/

The trick is to reverse element order by floating both elements, the first to the right, the second to the left, so the second appears first.

.child1 {
    width: calc(100% - 160px);
    float: right;
}
.child2 {
    width: 145px;
    float: left;
}

Finally, add a clearfix to the parent and you're done (see the fiddle for the complete solution).

Generally, as long as the element with absolute position is positioned at the top of the parent element, chances are good that you find a workaround by floating the element.

9

Feeela is right but you can get a parent div contracting/expanding to a child element if you reverse your div positioning like this:

.parent{
    postion: absolute;
    /* position it in the browser using the `left`, `top` and `margin` 
       attributes */
}

.child{
    position: relative;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;

    overflow: hidden;
    /* to pad or move it around using `left` and `top` inside the parent */
}

This should work for you.

  • 116
    Some CSS code would make your answer much clearer. – user2015707 Apr 25 '13 at 13:16
8

There is a quite simple way to solve this.

You just have to duplicate the content of child1 and child2 in relative divs with display:none in parent div. Say child1_1 and child2_2. Put child2_2 on top and child1_1 at the bottom.

When your jquery (or whatever) calls the absolute div, just set the according relative div (child1_1 or child2_2) with display:block AND visibility:hidden. The relative child will still be invisible but will make parent's div higher.

  • 2
    This got me thinking in the right direction. In my case setting display: none on the "size holder" content makes the div not size, however opacity: 0, sizes the div correctly and doesn't require any additional jquery. – edencorbin Oct 19 '16 at 17:56
  • The way I did was to get two duplicate divs the first one is the visible content with position absolute and the second one is a div with visibility hidden that keeps the parent div with the correct height all works fine =D – Diogo Garcia Nov 9 '16 at 11:31
  • This answer works for me. Thanks a lot!!!! – Ricky Jiao Jun 26 '17 at 2:37
2

I had a similar problem. To solve this (instead of calculate the iframe's height using the body, document or window) I created a div that wraps the whole page content (a div with an id="page" for example) and then I used its height.

2

There's a very simple hack that fixes this issue

Here's a codesandbox that illustrates the solution: https://codesandbox.io/s/00w06z1n5l

HTML

<div id="parent">
  <div class="hack">
   <div class="child">
   </div>
  </div>
</div>

CSS

.parent { position: relative; width: 100%; }
.hack { position: absolute; left:0; right:0; top:0;}
.child { position: absolute; left: 0; right: 0; bottom:0; }

you can play with the positioning of the hack div to affect where the child positions itself.

Here's a snippet:

html {
  font-family: sans-serif;
  text-align: center;
}

.container {
  border: 2px solid gray;
  height: 400px;
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
}

.stuff-the-middle {
  background: papayawhip
    url("https://camo.githubusercontent.com/6609e7239d46222bbcbd846155351a8ce06eb11f/687474703a2f2f692e696d6775722e636f6d2f4e577a764a6d6d2e706e67");
  flex: 1;
}

.parent {
  background: palevioletred;
  position: relative;
}

.hack {
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  top:0;
  right: 0;
}
.child {
  height: 40px;
  background: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5);
  position: absolute;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
}
    <div class="container">
      <div class="stuff-the-middle">
        I have stuff annoyingly in th emiddle
      </div>
      <div class="parent">
        <div class="hack">
          <div class="child">
            I'm inside of my parent but absolutely on top
          </div>
        </div>
        I'm the parent
        <br /> You can modify my height
        <br /> and my child is always on top
        <br /> absolutely on top
        <br /> try removing this text
      </div>
    </div>

1

I came up with another solution, which I don't love but gets the job done.

Basically duplicate the child elements in such a way that the duplicates are not visible.

<div id="parent">
    <div class="width-calc">
        <div class="child1"></div>
        <div class="child2"></div>
    </div>

    <div class="child1"></div>
    <div class="child2"></div>
</div>

CSS:

.width-calc {
    height: 0;
    overflow: hidden;
}

If those child elements contain little markup, then the impact will be small.

  • 3
    This can give some problems with search engine ranking – mschadegg Jan 19 '16 at 14:23
1

"You either use fixed heights or you need to involve JS."

Here is the JS example:

---------- jQuery JS example--------------------

    function findEnvelopSizeOfAbsolutelyPositionedChildren(containerSelector){
        var maxX = $(containerSelector).width(), maxY = $(containerSelector).height();

        $(containerSelector).children().each(function (i){
            if (maxX < parseInt($(this).css('left')) + $(this).width()){
                maxX = parseInt($(this).css('left')) + $(this).width();
            }
            if (maxY < parseInt($(this).css('top')) + $(this).height()){
                maxY = parseInt($(this).css('top')) + $(this).height();
            }
        });
        return {
            'width': maxX,
            'height': maxY
        }
    }

    var specBodySize = findEnvelopSizeOfAbsolutelyPositionedSubDivs("#SpecBody");
    $("#SpecBody").width(specBodySize.width);
    $("#SpecBody").height(specBodySize.height);
  • This answer could benefit from better explanation and direction of the proposed solution. – DaniDev Feb 28 '18 at 20:26
1

With pure JavaScript, you just need to retrieve the height of your static position child element .child1 using the getComputedStyle() method then set that retrieve value as the padding-top for that same child using the HTMLElement.style property.


Check and run the following Code Snippet for a practical example of what I described above:

/* JavaScript */

var child1 = document.querySelector(".child1");
var parent = document.getElementById("parent");

var childHeight = parseInt(window.getComputedStyle(child1).height) + "px";
child1.style.paddingTop = childHeight;
/* CSS */

#parent { position: relative; width: 100%; }
.child1 { width: auto; }
.child2 { width: 145px; position: absolute; top: 0px; bottom: 0px; }
html, body { width: 100%;height: 100%; margin: 0; padding: 0; }
<!-- HTML -->

<div id="parent">
    <div class="child1">STATIC</div>
    <div class="child2">ABSOLUTE</div>
</div>

0

There is a better way to do this now. You can use the bottom property.

    .my-element {
      position: absolute;
      bottom: 30px;
    }
  • 4
    this will work only if you know the final height of the parent, which you don't – machineaddict Jun 10 '15 at 8:34
0

This is very similar to what @ChrisC suggested. It is not using an absolute positioned element, but a relative one. Maybe could work for you

<div class="container">
  <div class="my-child"></div>
</div>

And your css like this:

.container{
    background-color: red;
    position: relative;
    border: 1px solid black;
    width: 100%;
}

.my-child{
    position: relative;
    top: 0;
    left: 100%;
    height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    margin-left: -100px;
    background-color: blue;
}

https://jsfiddle.net/royriojas/dndjwa6t/

0

Also consider next approach:

CSS:

.parent {
  height: 100%;
}
.parent:after {
  content: '';
  display: block;
}

Also since you are trying to reposition divs consider css grid

-1

Absolute views position themselves against the nearest ancestor that isn't statically positioned (position: static), therefore if you want an absolute view positioned against a given parent, set the parent position to relative and the child to position to absolute

-4

Try this, it was worked for me

.child {
    width: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    bottom: 0px;
    z-index: 1;
}

It will set child height to parent height

  • great solution! – Alexander Cherednichenko Apr 2 '18 at 11:13
  • 3
    @AlexanderCherednichenko Not really, it misses the point of the question. – wickywills Apr 11 '18 at 13:55

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