97

What are the advantages of having declarations in a .inl file? When would I need to use the same?

  • 3
    FWIW, i hate .inl files. Why split up your code more than necessary? – Shog9 Jul 30 '09 at 17:23
  • 9
    @shog9: To seporate interface from implementation. I have always hated C# and Java file because it so hard to read the interface because of all the messey implementation details. – Martin York Jul 30 '09 at 18:49
  • 7
    @Martin - unfortunately C++ gives us a bad combination of both worlds - the interface and part of the implementation in the header, the rest of the implementation in the .cpp file. Even if you avoid inline functions (or put them in .inl files) you have to clutter up the interface with the pesky details of private members unless you're able to religiously use the pimpl idiom. – Michael Burr Jul 30 '09 at 19:48
  • 3
    Yeah, I've never understood the argument that headers separate interface from implementation. They obviously don't. An interface should not contain all the private members. – jalf Jul 30 '09 at 21:40
  • @LokiAstari: To be fair, Java/C# has very good tooling providing the interface outline automatically. One might put it the other way around: In C++ you have to manually solve a problem, which can be fully solved by computers. – bluenote10 Oct 22 '16 at 11:42
125

.inl files are never mandatory and have no special significance to the compiler. It's just a way of structuring your code that provides a hint to the humans that might read it.

I use .inl files in two cases:

  • For definitions of inline functions.
  • For definitions of function templates.

In both cases, I put the declarations of the functions in a header file, which is included by other files, then I #include the .inl file at the bottom of the header file.

I like it because it separates the interface from the implementation and makes the header file a little easier to read. If you care about the implementation details, you can open the .inl file and read it. If you don't, you don't have to.

  • 1
    Indeed, it's mostly about separating interface from implementation. – Pavel Minaev Jul 30 '09 at 17:41
  • 1
    I've also seen .ipp and .ixx used for inline definitions and .tpp and .txx for template one. – AProgrammer Jul 30 '09 at 18:34
  • 1
    For example, the GNU Standard C++ Library uses .tcc for template implementation files. – musiphil Jan 3 '13 at 18:57
  • 1
    @NickMeyer glm uses .hpp and .inl in exactly the same way you've mentioned above. Good to know, thanks for the great answer :) – legends2k May 2 '13 at 19:43
80

Nick Meyer is right: The compiler doesn't care about the extension of the file you're including, so things like ".h", ".hpp", ".hxx", ".hh", ".inl", ".inc", etc. are a simple convention, to make it clear what the files is supposed to contain.

The best example is the STL header files which have no extension whatsoever.

Usually, ".inl" files do contain inline code (hence the ".inl" extension).

Those files ".inl" files are a necessity when you have a dependency cycle between header code.

For example:

// A.hpp
struct A
{
    void doSomethingElse()
    {
       // Etc.
    }

    void doSomething(B & b)
    {
       b.doSomethingElse() ;
    }
} ;

And:

// B.hpp
struct B
{
    void doSomethingElse()
    {
       // Etc.
    }

    void doSomething(A & a)
    {
       a.doSomethingElse() ;
    }
} ;

There's no way you'll have it compile, including using forward declaration.

The solution is then to break down definition and implementation into two kind of header files:

  • hpp for header declaration/definition
  • inl for header implementation

Which breaks down into the following example:

// A.hpp

struct B ;

struct A
{
    void doSomethingElse() ;
    void doSomething(B & b) ;
} ;

And:

// A.inl
#include <A.hpp>
#include <B.hpp>

inline void A::doSomethingElse()
{
   // Etc.
}

inline void A::doSomething(B & b)
{
   b.doSomethingElse() ;
}

And:

// B.hpp

struct A ;

struct B
{
    void doSomethingElse() ;
    void doSomething(A & a) ;
} ;

And:

// B.INL
#include <B.hpp>
#include <A.hpp>

inline void B::doSomethingElse()
{
   // Etc.
}

inline void B::doSomething(A & a)
{
   a.doSomethingElse() ;
}

This way, you can include whatever ".inl" file you need in your own source, and it will work.

Again, the suffix names of included files are not really important, only their uses.

  • 4
    This explains the real benefit (or necessity) of separation, and should have been chosen as the answer. – musiphil Jan 3 '13 at 18:59
  • If the function were not inline, you would you standard .cpp file for the implementation part? – Bublafus Apr 10 '15 at 20:55
  • @Bublafus :If the function were not inline, you would you standard .cpp file for the implementation part? : Possibly. Templates are examples of code that cannot usually be hidden in .CPP files, so in that case, the .INL file would be mandatory. – paercebal Apr 11 '15 at 21:21
31

Since nobody else has mentioned it:

The use of .inl files to store your inline functions can be useful for speeding up compiles.

If you only include the declarations (.h) where you need declarations, and only include inline implementations (.inl) where you need them ( i.e. probably only in .cpp and other .inl files, not .h's ), it can have a beneficial effect on your header dependencies.

This can be a significant win on larger projects with many interacting classes.

  • 6
    +1: the world is definitely a different place when you are managing millions of lines of code and thousands of files. – gatorfax Jul 30 '09 at 21:29
  • so you should never include .inl in header files? I always had the feeling that .inl should be put on the bottom of header files since inline functions require declaration and implementation to be reachable at once. – Icebone1000 May 20 '13 at 17:51
  • 1
    Icebone1000 not all modules that include the header necessarily want to use the inline functions, so they have no need for the implementations to be read in, they're not required to be present if they're not used. – Andy J Buchanan Jun 26 '13 at 14:57
  • 1
    I don't understand how it can be faster, since the compiler has to do more work to include and combine the translation units. – Nikos Oct 19 '18 at 5:42
  • @Nikos I think he meant faster relative to putting all your inline functions in your header files. – CoffeeTableEspresso Jun 4 at 20:21
3

In my experience, .inl files are used to define inline functions. When they're in an .inl file, the file can be included in a header to get inline functions and in a .c file to get regular function definitions.

This way the same source can more easily work with compilers that do not have inline function supportas well as compilers that do.

They're usually used with straight C code, not often with C++ code as all C++ compilers support inline functions.

  • I don't see the point in doing this just to get C support. For C, you'd just conditionally #define inline static, and define your inline functions in the header. – Pavel Minaev Jul 30 '09 at 17:41
  • I guess this avoids multiple copies of the same function from ending up in the binary. I'm just saying I've seen .inl files used this way, not that it's the only technique (or even best). – Michael Burr Jul 30 '09 at 17:49
1

I believe it's just a naming convention for a "header" file includes inline code. it's so that .h files can contain definitions and .inl files contain inline code which is necessary for templates.

I don't belive there is anything more to it than an naming convention to make the purpose of the file clear

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