I've written some code to implement an algorithm that takes as input a vector q of real numbers, and returns as an output a complex matrix R. The Matlab code below produces a plot showing the input vector q and the output matrix R.

Given only the complex matrix output R, I would like to obtain the input vector q. Can I do this using least-squares optimization? Since there is a recursive running sum in the code (rs_r and rs_i), the calculation for a column of the output matrix is dependent on the calculation of the previous column.

Perhaps a non-linear optimization can be set up to recompose the input vector q from the output matrix R?

Looking at this in another way, I've used an algorithm to compute a matrix R. I want to run the algorithm "in reverse," to get the input vector q from the output matrix R.

If there is no way to recompose the starting values from the output, thereby treating the problem as a "black box," then perhaps the mathematics of the model itself can be used in the optimization? The program evaluates the following equation:

Equations

The Utilde(tau, omega) is the output matrix R. The tau (time) variable comprises the columns of the response matrix R, whereas the omega (frequency) variable comprises the rows of the response matrix R. The integration is performed as a recursive running sum from tau = 0 up to the current tau timestep.

Here are the plots created by the program posted below:

q value input matrix output

Here is the full program code:

N = 1001;
q = zeros(N, 1); % here is the input
q(1:200) = 55;
q(201:300) = 120;
q(301:400) = 70;
q(401:600) = 40;
q(601:800) = 100;
q(801:1001) = 70;
dt = 0.0042;
fs = 1 / dt;
wSize = 101;
Glim = 20;
ginv = 0;
R = get_response(N, q, dt, wSize, Glim, ginv); % R is output matrix
rows = wSize; 
cols = N;

figure; plot(q); title('q value input as vector'); 
ylim([0 200]); xlim([0 1001])

figure; imagesc(abs(R)); title('Matrix output of algorithm')
colorbar

Here is the function that performs the calculation:

function response = get_response(N, Q, dt, wSize, Glim, ginv)

fs = 1 / dt; 
Npad = wSize - 1; 
N1 = wSize + Npad;
N2 = floor(N1 / 2 + 1);
f = (fs/2)*linspace(0,1,N2);
omega = 2 * pi .* f';
omegah = 2 * pi * f(end);
sigma2 = exp(-(0.23*Glim + 1.63));

sign = 1;
if(ginv == 1)
    sign = -1;
end

ratio = omega ./ omegah;
rs_r = zeros(N2, 1);  
rs_i = zeros(N2, 1);   
termr = zeros(N2, 1);
termi = zeros(N2, 1);
termr_sub1 = zeros(N2, 1);
termi_sub1 = zeros(N2, 1);
response = zeros(N2, N);

 % cycle over cols of matrix
for ti = 1:N               

    term0 = omega ./ (2 .* Q(ti));
    gamma = 1 / (pi * Q(ti));

    % calculate for the real part
    if(ti == 1)
        Lambda = ones(N2, 1);
        termr_sub1(1) = 0;  
        termr_sub1(2:end) = term0(2:end) .* (ratio(2:end).^-gamma);  
    else
        termr(1) = 0; 
        termr(2:end) = term0(2:end) .* (ratio(2:end).^-gamma); 
        rs_r = rs_r - dt.*(termr + termr_sub1);
        termr_sub1 = termr;
        Beta = exp( -1 .* -0.5 .* rs_r );

        Lambda = (Beta + sigma2) ./ (Beta.^2 + sigma2);  % vector
    end 

    % calculate for the complex part  
    if(ginv == 1)  
        termi(1) = 0;
        termi(2:end) = (ratio(2:end).^(sign .* gamma) - 1) .* omega(2:end);
    else
        termi = (ratio.^(sign .* gamma) - 1) .* omega;
    end
    rs_i = rs_i - dt.*(termi + termi_sub1);
    termi_sub1 = termi;
    integrand = exp( 1i .* -0.5 .* rs_i );

    if(ginv == 1) 
        response(:,ti) = Lambda .* integrand;
    else        
        response(:,ti) = (1 ./ Lambda) .* integrand;
    end  
end % ti loop

No, you cannot do so unless you know the "model" itself for this process. If you intend to treat the process as a complete black box, then it is impossible in general, although in any specific instance, anything can happen.

Even if you DO know the underlying process, then it may still not work, as any least squares estimator is dependent on the starting values, so if you do not have a good guess there, it may converge to the wrong set of parameters.

  • Thanks woodchips; this is greatly appreciated! What makes this problem so ill-posed, and what might I consider changing? If I get rid of the recursive running sum (which is a cumulative trapezoidal integration), might this make the problem better posed? – Nicholas Kinar Aug 23 '12 at 0:30
  • 1
    Use of a running sum as an approximate cumulative integral can always be replaced by higher order approximations, but if this is part of the black box for which you are trying to estimate the parameters, then it won't matter. Understanding what makes a complex problem ill-posed can be difficult. If there is an actual singularity, you may be able to discover whence it arises by looking at the eigenvectors corresponding to essentially zero eigenvalues of the Hessian, but this need not be obvious. Good starting values are always crucial. – user85109 Aug 23 '12 at 0:40
  • Thanks again, woodchips. I've now updated my question to include the equations comprising the mathematical model. Given the output matrix R, and knowing the mathematics shown above, can I set up an optimization problem? How might I replace the running sum using higher-order approximations? – Nicholas Kinar Aug 23 '12 at 1:36
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It turns out that by using the mathematics of the model, the input can be estimated. This is not true in general, but for my problem it seems to work. The cumulative integral is eliminated by a partial derivative.

N = 1001;
q = zeros(N, 1);
q(1:200) = 55;
q(201:300) = 120;
q(301:400) = 70;
q(401:600) = 40;
q(601:800) = 100;
q(801:1001) = 70;
dt = 0.0042;
fs = 1 / dt;
wSize = 101;
Glim = 20;
ginv = 0;
R = get_response(N, q, dt, wSize, Glim, ginv);
rows = wSize; 
cols = N;
cut_val = 200;

imagLogR = imag(log(R));

Mderiv = zeros(rows, cols-2);
for k = 1:rows
   val = deriv_3pt(imagLogR(k,:), dt);
   val(val > cut_val) = 0;
   Mderiv(k,:) = val(1:end-1);
end

disp('Running iteration');
q0 = 10;
q1 = 500;
NN = cols - 2;
qout = zeros(NN, 1);
for k = 1:NN
    data = Mderiv(:,k); 
    qout(k) = fminbnd(@(q) curve_fit_to_get_q(q, dt, rows, data),q0,q1);
end

figure; plot(q); title('q value input as vector'); 
ylim([0 200]); xlim([0 1001])

figure;
plot(qout); title('Reconstructed q')
ylim([0 200]); xlim([0 1001])

Here are the supporting functions:

function output = deriv_3pt(x, dt)

% Function to compute dx/dt using the 3pt symmetrical rule
% dt is the timestep

N = length(x);
N0 = N - 1;
output = zeros(N0, 1);
denom = 2 * dt;

for k = 2:N0 
   output(k - 1) = (x(k+1) - x(k-1)) / denom;  
end


function sse = curve_fit_to_get_q(q, dt, rows, data)

fs = 1 / dt;
N2 = rows;
f = (fs/2)*linspace(0,1,N2);  % vector for frequency along cols
omega = 2 * pi .* f';
omegah = 2 * pi * f(end);
ratio = omega ./ omegah;

gamma = 1 / (pi * q);

termi = ((ratio.^(gamma)) - 1) .* omega;

Error_Vector =  termi - data;
sse = sum(Error_Vector.^2);

Original Estimated

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