346

I've been looking at the markdown syntax used in GitHub for a while but except resizing an image to the extent of the README.md page, I can't figure out how to center an image in it.

Is it possible? If it is, how?

  • Pandoc has proposed a general syntax for describing textual content that, should it become part of the Markdown standard, would facilitate centering images. – Dave Jarvis Jun 29 '17 at 15:53
  • 1
    Does this answer your question? Markdown and image alignment – TylerH May 20 at 19:11

13 Answers 13

164

I've been looking at the markdown syntax used in github [...], I can't figure out how to center an image

TL;DR

No you can't by only relying on Markdown syntax. Markdown doesn't care with positioning.

Note: Some markdown processors support inclusion of HTML (as rightfully pointed out by @waldyr.ar), and in the GitHub case you may fallback to something like <div style="text-align:center"><img src="..." /></div>. Beware that there's no guarantee the image will be centered if your repository is forked in a different hosting environment (Codeplex, BitBucket, ...) or if the document isn't read through a browser (Sublime Text Markdown preview, MarkdownPad, VisualStudio Web Essentials Markdown preview, ...).

Note 2: Keep in mind that even within the GitHub website, the way markdown is rendered is not uniform. The wiki, for instance, won't allow such css positional trickery.

Unabridged version

The Markdown syntax doesn't provide one with the ability to control the position of an image.

In fact, it would be borderline against the Markdown philosophy to allow such formatting, as stated in the "Philosophy" section

"A Markdown-formatted document should be publishable as-is, as plain text, without looking like it’s been marked up with tags or formatting instructions. "

Markdown files are rendered by github.com website through the use of the Ruby Redcarpet library.

Redcarpet exposes some extensions (such as strikethrough, for instance) which are not part of standard Markdown syntax and provide additional "features". However, no supported extension allow you to center an image.

| improve this answer | |
  • 47
    This works just fine: <img align="..." src="..." alt="..."> – Nux Jan 31 '13 at 2:17
  • 1
    @JohonnyPauling, if you are worried about not using too much github bandwith, you can give a look to Raw Git, that serves files stored on GitHub, caching them on their system. So, just one access is performed on the resource on GitHub, saving their bandwith. – danidemi Feb 15 '15 at 13:14
  • 7
    Original markdown processes markdown syntax within span tags. So some thing like the following should work: <span style="display:block;text-align:center">![Test Automation]Automated-Testing.png)</span> – Dakshinamurthy Karra Aug 27 '17 at 10:01
  • 6
    The align attribute on an img tag is deprecated as of HTML 4.01 and obsolete as of HTML5. – taylorthurlow May 12 '18 at 23:20
  • @Nux What is fine about it? align doesn't take center value. – x-yuri Jan 31 '19 at 13:25
611

This is from Github's support:

Hey Waldyr,

Markdown doesn't allow you to tweak alignment directly (see docs here: http://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/syntax#img), but you can just use a raw HTML 'img' tag and do the alignment with inline css.

Cheers,

So it is possible to align images! You just have to use inline css to solve the problem. You can take an example from my github repo. At the bottom of README.md there is a centered aligned image. For simplicity you can just do as follows:

<p align="center">
  <img src="http://some_place.com/image.png" />
</p>

Although, as nulltoken said, it would be borderline against the Markdown philosophy!


This code from my readme:

<p align="center">
  <img src="https://github.com/waldyr/Sublime-Installer/blob/master/sublime_text.png?raw=true" alt="Sublime's custom image"/>
</p>

Produces this image output, except centered when viewed on GitHub:

Sublime's custom image

| improve this answer | |
  • 95
    Why this wasn't the accepted answer I don't know. This answer actually explains to the asker how to accomplish the task. – Fergus In London Nov 14 '12 at 21:18
  • 97
    +1, I don't care if this is against the markdown philosophy, I just want to center an image! :D – Gabriel Llamas Feb 2 '13 at 10:09
  • 6
    Yeah, down with the markdown philosophy, just let us make things look pretty :p – Thomas Oct 12 '13 at 12:20
  • 3
    This appears to work (as seen in the poster's repo), but CSS is NOT supported in the Github wiki. Every attempt I've made to specify CSS has been stripped out. Likewise, the align attribute specified is also removed when I attempt do do this in the wiki. – Shawn South Jan 17 '14 at 1:04
  • 4
    It seems that the align attribute is not supported in HTML5? – ostrokach Jun 6 '17 at 19:31
41

Alternatively, if you have control of the css, you could get clever with url parameters and css.

Markdown:

![A cute kitten](http://placekitten.com/200/300?style=centerme)

And CSS:

img[src$="centerme"] {
  display:block;
  margin: 0 auto;
}

You could create a variety of styling options this way and still keep the markdown clean of extra code. Of course you have no control over what happens if someone else uses the markdown somewhere else but thats a general styling issue with all markdown documents one shares.

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35

For left alignment

 <img align="left" width="600" height="200" src="https://www.python.org/python-.png">

For right alignment

<img align="right" width="600" height="200" src="https://www.python.org/python-.png">

And for center alignment

<p align="center">
  <img width="600" height="200" src="https://www.python.org/python-.png">
</p>

Fork it here for future references, if you find this useful.

| improve this answer | |
34

It works for me on github

<p align="center"> 
<img src="...">
</p>
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9

You can also resize the image to the desired width and height. For example:

<p align="center">
  <img src="https://anyserver.com/image.png" width="750px" height="300px"/></p>

To add a centered caption to the image, just one more line:

<p align="center">This is a centered caption for the image<p align="center">

Fortunately, this works both for README.md and the GitHub Wiki pages.

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9

We can use this. Please change the src location of ur img from git folder and add alternate text if img is not loaded

 <p align="center"> 
    <img src="ur img url here" alt="alternate text">
 </p>
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8

Just go to the Readme.md file and use this code.

<div align="center">
<img src=https://newfastuff.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/bW7QXVB.png" >
<p>Perfectly balanced</p>
</div>

enter image description here


<div align=”center”> [ Your content here ]</div> fits everything in the page and center aligns it according to the dimensions of the page.

| improve this answer | |
  • Only using div container was doing it right on GitLab ReadME page – dezible May 31 at 12:51
  • Small correction: s/b src="https://newfastuff.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/bW7QXVB.png". Otherwise, works a treat. – DaveL17 Jul 15 at 16:55
4

To extend the answer a little bit to support local images, just replace FILE_PATH_PLACEHOLDER to your image path and check it out.

<p align="center">
  <img src="FILE_PATH_PLACEHOLDER">
</p>
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3

My way to resolve the problem with image positioning was to use the HTML attributes:

![Image](Image.svg){ width="800" height="600" style="display: block; margin: 0 auto" }

The image was resized and centered properly, at least in my local VS markdown renderer.

Then, I have pushed changes to repo and unfortunately realized that it is not working for GitHub README.md file. Nevertheless I will left this answer as it might help someone else.

So finally, I have ended up using good old HTML tag instead:

<img src="Image.svg" alt="Image" width="800" height="600" style="display: block; margin: 0 auto" />

But guess what? Some JS method replaced my style attribute! I have even tried class attribute and with the same result!

Then I have found following gist page where even more old-school HTML was used:

<p align="center">
    <img src="Image.svg" alt="Image" width="800" height="600" />
</p>

This one is working fine however, I would like to leave it without further comments...

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2

TLDR;

Use this HTML/CSS to add and center an image and set its size to 60% of the screen space width inside your markdown file, which is usually a good starting value:

<img src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/RJj4x.png" 
     style="display:block;float:none;margin-left:auto;margin-right:auto;width:60%"> 

Change the width CSS value to whatever percent you want, or remove it altogether to use the markdown default size, which I think is 100% of the screen width if the image is larger than the screen, or it is the actual image width otherwise.

Done!

Or, keep reading for a lot more information.

Here are various HTML and CSS options which work perfectly inside markdown files:

1. Center and configure (resize) ALL images in your markdown file:

Just copy and paste this to the top of your markdown file to center and resize all images in the file (then just insert any images you want with normal markdown syntax):

<style>
img
{
    display:block; 
    float:none; 
    margin-left:auto;
    margin-right:auto;
    width:60%;
}
</style> 

Or, here is the same code as above but with detailed HTML and CSS comments to explain exactly what is going on:

<!-- (This is an HTML comment). Copy and paste this entire HTML `<style>...</style>` element (block)
to the top of your markdown file -->
<style>
/* (This is a CSS comment). The below `img` style sets the default CSS styling for all images
hereafter in this markdown file. */
img
{
    /* Default display value is `inline-block`. Set it to `block` to prevent surrounding text from
    wrapping around the image. Instead, `block` format will force the text to be above or below the
    image, but never to the sides. */
    display:block; 
    /* Common float options are `left`, `right`, and `none`. Set to `none` to override any previous
    settings which might have been `left` or `right`. `left` causes the image to be to the left,
    with text wrapped to the right of the image, and `right` causes the image to be to the right,
    with text wrapped to its left, so long as `display:inline-block` is also used. */
    float:none; 
    /* Set both the left and right margins to `auto` to cause the image to be centered. */
    margin-left:auto;
    margin-right:auto;
    /* You may also set the size of the image, in percent of width of the screen on which the image
    is being viewed, for example. A good starting point is 60%. It will auto-scale and auto-size
    the image no matter what screen or device it is being viewed on, maintaining proporptions and 
    not distorting it. */
    width:60%;
    /* You may optionally force a fixed size, or intentionally skew/distort an image by also 
    setting the height. Values for `width` and `height` are commonly set in either percent (%) 
    or pixels (px). Ex: `width:100%;` or `height:600px;`. */
    /* height:400px; */
}
</style> 

Now, whether you insert an image using markdown:

![](https://i.stack.imgur.com/RJj4x.png)

Or HTML in your markdown file:

<img src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/RJj4x.png"> 

...it will be automatically centered and sized to 60% of the screenview width, as described in the comments within the HTML and CSS above. (Of course the 60% size is really easily changeable too, and I present simple ways below to do it on an image-by-image basis as well).

2. Center and configure images on a case-by-case basis, one at a time:

Whether or not you have copied and pasted the above <style> block into the top of your markdown file, this will also work, as it overrides and takes precedence over any file-scope style settings you may have set above:

<img src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/RJj4x.png" style="display:block;float:none;margin-left:auto;margin-right:auto;width:60%"> 

You can also format it on multiple lines, like this, and it will still work:

<img src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/RJj4x.png" 
     alt="this is an optional description of the image to help the blind and show up in case the 
          image won't load" 
     style="display:block; /* override the default display setting of `inline-block` */ 
            float:none; /* override any prior settings of `left` or `right` */ 
            /* set both the left and right margins to `auto` to center the image */
            margin-left:auto; 
            margin-right:auto;
            width:60%; /* optionally resize the image to a screen percentage width if you want too */
            "> 

3. In addition to all of the above, you can also create CSS style classes to help stylize individual images:

Add this whole thing to the top of your markdown file.

<style>

/* By default, make all images center-aligned, and 60% of the width 
of the screen in size */
img
{
    display:block; 
    float:none; 
    margin-left:auto;
    margin-right:auto;
    width:60%;
}

/* Create a CSS class to style images to left-align, or "float left" */
.leftAlign
{
    display:inline-block;
    float:left;
    /* provide a 15 pixel gap between the image and the text to its right */
    margin-right:15px; 
}

/* Create a CSS class to style images to right-align, or "float right" */
.rightAlign
{
    display:inline-block;
    float:right;
    /* provide a 15 pixel gap between the image and the text to its left */
    margin-left:15px;
}

</style> 

Now, your img CSS block has set the default setting for images to be centered and 60% of the width of the screen space in size, but you can use the leftAlign and rightAlign CSS classes to override those settings on an image-by-image basis.

For example, this image will be center-aligned and 60% in size (the default I set above):

<img src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/RJj4x.png"> 

This image will be left-aligned, however, with text wrapping to its right, using the leftAlign CSS class we just created above!

<img src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/RJj4x.png" class="leftAlign">

It might look like this:

enter image description here

You can still override any of its CSS properties via the style attribute, however, such as width, like this:

<img src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/RJj4x.png" class="leftAlign" style="width:20%">

And now you'll get this:

enter image description here

4. Create 3 CSS classes, but don't change the img markdown defaults

Another option to what we just showed above, where we modified the default img property:value settings and created 2 classes, is to just leave all the default markdown img properties alone, but create 3 custom CSS classes, like this:

<style>

/* Create a CSS class to style images to center-align */
.centerAlign
{
    display:block;
    float:none;
    /* Set both the left and right margins to `auto` to cause the image to be centered. */
    margin-left:auto;
    margin-right:auto;
    width:60%;
}

/* Create a CSS class to style images to left-align, or "float left" */
.leftAlign
{
    display:inline-block;
    float:left;
    /* provide a 15 pixel gap between the image and the text to its right */
    margin-right:15px; 
    width:60%;
}

/* Create a CSS class to style images to right-align, or "float right" */
.rightAlign
{
    display:inline-block;
    float:right;
    /* provide a 15 pixel gap between the image and the text to its left */
    margin-left:15px;
    width:60%;
}

</style> 

Use them, of course, like this:

<img src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/RJj4x.png" class="centerAlign" style="width:20%">

Notice how I manually set the width property using the CSS style attribute above, but if I had something more complicated I wanted to do, I could also create some additional classes like this, adding them inside the <style>...</style> block above:

/* custom CSS class to set a predefined "small" size for an image */
.small
{
    width:20%;
    /* set any other properties, as desired, inside this class too */
}

Now you can assign multiple classes to the same object, like this. Simply separate class names by a space, NOT a comma. In the event of conflicting settings, I believe whichever setting comes last will be the one that takes effect, overriding any previously-set settings. This should also be the case in the event you set the same CSS properties multiple times in the same CSS class or inside the same HTML style attribute.

<img src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/RJj4x.png" class="centerAlign small">

5. Consolidate Common Settings in CSS Classes:

The last trick is one I learned in this answer here: How can I use CSS to style multiple images differently?. As you can see above, all 3 of the CSS align classes set the image width to 60%. Therefore, this common setting can be set all at once like this if you wish, then you can set the specific settings for each class afterwards:

<style>

/* set common properties for multiple CSS classes all at once */
.centerAlign, .leftAlign, .rightAlign {
    width:60%;
}

/* Now set the specific properties for each class individually */

/* Create a CSS class to style images to center-align */
.centerAlign
{
    display:block;
    float:none;
    /* Set both the left and right margins to `auto` to cause the image to be centered. */
    margin-left:auto;
    margin-right:auto;
}

/* Create a CSS class to style images to left-align, or "float left" */
.leftAlign
{
    display:inline-block;
    float:left;
    /* provide a 15 pixel gap between the image and the text to its right */
    margin-right:15px; 
}

/* Create a CSS class to style images to right-align, or "float right" */
.rightAlign
{
    display:inline-block;
    float:right;
    /* provide a 15 pixel gap between the image and the text to its left */
    margin-left:15px;
}

/* custom CSS class to set a predefined "small" size for an image */
.small
{
    width:20%;
    /* set any other properties, as desired, inside this class too */
}

</style> 

More Details:

1. My thoughts on HTML and CSS in Markdown

As far as I'm concerned, anything which can be written in a markdown document and get the desired result is all we are after, not some "pure markdown" syntax.

In C and C++, the compiler compiles down to assembly code, and the assembly is then assembled down to binary. Sometimes, however, you need the low-level control that only assembly can provide, and so you can write inline assembly right inside of a C or C++ source file. Assembly is the "lower level" language and it can be written right inside C and C++.

So it is with markdown. Markdown is the high-level language which is interpreted down to HTML and CSS. However, where we need extra control, we can just "inline" the lower-level HTML and CSS right inside of our markdown file, and it will still be interpreted correctly. In a sense, therefore, HTML and CSS are valid "markdown" syntax.

So, to center an image in markdown, use HTML and CSS.

2. Standard image insertion in markdown:

How to add a basic image in markdown with default "behind-the-scenes" HTML and CSS formatting:

This markdown:

![](https://i.stack.imgur.com/RJj4x.png)

Will produce this output:

This is my fire-shooting hexacopter I made.

You can also optionally add a description in the opening square brackets. Honestly I'm not even sure what that does, but perhaps it gets converted into an HTML <img> element alt attribute, which gets displayed in case the image can't load, and may be read by screen readers for the blind. So, this markdown:

![this is my hexacopter I built](https://i.stack.imgur.com/RJj4x.png)

will also produce this output:

this is my hexacopter I built

3. More details on what's happening in the HTML/CSS when centering and resizing an image in markdown:

Centering the image in markdown requires that we use the extra control that HTML and CSS can give us directly. You can insert and center an individual image like this:

<img src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/RJj4x.png" 
     alt="this is my hexacopter I built" 
     style="display:block; 
            float:none; 
            margin-left:auto; 
            margin-right:auto;
            "> 

Here's more info. on what is going on here:

  1. The <img part of the above code is the HTML "start tag", while the > at the end is the HTML "end tag".
  2. Everything from the start tag to the end tag, inclusive, makes up this HTML img "element".
  3. HTML img "tags"/"elements" are used to insert images into HTML.
  4. Each of the assignments inside the element is configuring an HTML "attribute".
  5. The "style" attribute accepts CSS styling, so everything inside the double quotes here: style="" is a CSS property:value key-value "declaration".
    1. Note that each CSS "property:value declaration" is separated by a semicolon (;), whereas each HTML "attribute" in this "element" is separated by a space ().
  6. To get the image to center in our HTML and CSS code above, the key "attributes" are simply the src and style ones.
  7. The alt one is optional.
  8. Inside the HTML style attribute, which accepts CSS styling, the key declarations are all 4 that I show: display:block, float:none, margin-left:auto, and margin-right:auto.
    1. If nothing has previously set the float property before, then you can leave off this declaration, but it's a good idea to have it anyway just in case.
    2. If first learned how to center an image using HTML and CSS here: https://www.w3schools.com/howto/howto_css_image_center.asp.
  9. CSS uses C-style comments (/* my comment */).

References:

  1. Read more about CSS Syntax here: https://www.w3schools.com/css/css_syntax.asp
  2. Read about "HTML Tags vs Elements" here.
  3. I did a lot of my HTML and CSS styling practice in my GitHub markdown readme here: https://github.com/ElectricRCAircraftGuy/Arduino-STEM-Presentation
  4. I learned just about everything I know about HTML and CSS by clicking around on w3schools.com. Here's a few specific pages:
    1. %%%%%https://www.w3schools.com/howto/howto_css_image_center.asp
    2. https://www.w3schools.com/css/css_float.asp
      1. https://www.w3schools.com/css/tryit.asp?filename=trycss_layout_float2
    3. https://www.w3schools.com/css/css3_images.asp
    4. https://www.w3schools.com/tags/default.asp
    5. HTML and CSS comments: https://www.w3schools.com/css/css_comments.asp
  5. My fire-shooting hexacopter I made: https://www.electricrcaircraftguy.com/2016/05/battlebots-season-2-buzz-fire-drone.html
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0

A "pure" markdown approach that can handle this is adding the image to a table and then centering the cell:

| ![Image](img.png) |
| :--: | 

It should produce HTML similar to this:

<table>
    <thead>
        <tr>
            <th style="text-align:center;"><img src="img.png" alt="Image"></th>
        </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
    </tbody>
</table>
| improve this answer | |
  • This doesn't appear to work: the table's width is determined by the width of its contents. It also puts a border around the image (per github's default style sheet). – Richard Smith May 7 at 21:32
  • I didn't realize it did that. Outside of GitHub this is how I center images in markdown. – afuzzyllama May 7 at 21:37
-15

This is quite simple really.

-> This is centered Text <-

So taking that in mind you can apply this to the img syntax.

->![alt text](/link/to/img)<-
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  • 3
    What flavor of Markdown is that? – Wingman4l7 Mar 27 '13 at 3:49
  • 2
    I'm curious here, as well. That looks like a screenshot of GitHub, but Redcarpet definitely does not implement that. How did you do this? Can you link to the file on GitHub? – ELLIOTTCABLE May 23 '13 at 21:57
  • 3
    It's a Jeckyll site, so GitHub parses to code before it even gets in the repo. – vdclouis May 24 '13 at 10:00
  • 5
    Just FYI for everyone who is considering flagging this for moderator attention: the fact that an answer doesn't work for you is not a reason to flag it. Just comment and/or downvote. I'm not going to delete an answer for technical inaccuracies. If vdclouis wants to delete it himself because the community finds it to be unhelpful, that should be his choice. – Cody Gray Aug 2 '17 at 9:30

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