194

I know that in JavaScript the syntax is as follows:

function myfunction(param){
  //some code
}

Is there a way to declare a function in jQuery that can be added to an element? For example:

$('#my_div').myfunction()
  • 6
    @RedEyedMonster - it makes plenty of sense. Ever used anything like jQuery datepicker? $('#myDatePickerfield').datePicker(); – Jamiec Aug 23 '12 at 13:55
  • No I haven't but thanks for alerting me to it :) – RedEyedMonster Aug 23 '12 at 13:58
  • 3
    @RedEyedMonster - You've probably used $("#someElement").hide() or .addClass()... – nnnnnn Aug 23 '12 at 13:59
  • @RedEyedMonster: the OP is describing jQuery plugins, which are actually pretty common in JavaScript. See docs.jquery.com/Plugins/Authoring – Paul D. Waite Aug 23 '12 at 14:00

13 Answers 13

269

From the Docs:

(function( $ ){
   $.fn.myfunction = function() {
      alert('hello world');
      return this;
   }; 
})( jQuery );

Then you do

$('#my_div').myfunction();
  • 56
    Just to add something I thought important: please add - return this; after the alert. It will make the function chain-able. – Potheek Sep 29 '13 at 15:09
  • 2
    Many right answers here. The jQuery-Docu shows the differences: learn.jquery.com/plugins/basic-plugin-creation – Andy Tschiersch May 12 '15 at 12:44
  • @candide at which point $('my_div').myfunction(); will be call – Nikhil G Jun 25 '15 at 6:10
  • 2
    @NikhilG $('my_div') refers to a tag <my_div></my_div>. You do need the hash sign there to refer to the id my_div. – Candide Jun 25 '15 at 7:05
  • 5
    This is a strange example because it doesn't really to anything to that element. – sheriffderek Mar 13 '16 at 20:09
74

In spite of all the answers you already received, it is worth noting that you do not need to write a plugin to use jQuery in a function. Certainly if it's a simple, one-time function, I believe writing a plugin is overkill. It could be done much more easily by just passing the selector to the function as a parameter. Your code would look something like this:

function myFunction($param) {
   $param.hide();  // or whatever you want to do
   ...
}

myFunction($('#my_div'));

Note that the $ in the variable name $param is not required. It is just a habit of mine to make it easy to remember that that variable contains a jQuery selector. You could just use param as well.

38

While there is a plethora of documentation / tutorials out there, the simple answer for your question is this:

// to create a jQuery function, you basically just extend the jQuery prototype
// (using the fn alias)

$.fn.myfunction = function () {
    // blah
};

Inside that function, the this variable corresponds to the jQuery wrapped set you called your function on. So something like:

$.fn.myfunction = function () {
    console.log(this.length);
};

$('.foo').myfunction();

... will flush to the console the number of elements with the class foo.

Of course, there is a bit more to semantics than that (as well as best practices, and all that jazz), so make sure you read up on it.

13

To make a function available on jQuery objects you add it to the jQuery prototype (fn is a shortcut for prototype in jQuery) like this:

jQuery.fn.myFunction = function() {
    // Usually iterate over the items and return for chainability
    // 'this' is the elements returns by the selector
    return this.each(function() { 
         // do something to each item matching the selector
    }
}

This is usually called a jQuery plugin.

Example - http://jsfiddle.net/VwPrm/

8

Yup — what you’re describing is a jQuery plugin.

To write a jQuery plugin, you create a function in JavaScript, and assign it to a property on the object jQuery.fn.

E.g.

jQuery.fn.myfunction = function(param) {
    // Some code
}

Within your plugin function, the this keyword is set to the jQuery object on which your plugin was invoked. So, when you do:

$('#my_div').myfunction()

Then this inside myfunction will be set to the jQuery object returned by $('#my_div').

See http://docs.jquery.com/Plugins/Authoring for the full story.

8
$(function () {
    //declare function 
    $.fn.myfunction = function () {
        return true;
    };
});

$(document).ready(function () {
    //call function
    $("#my_div").myfunction();
});
  • I don't think that the mismatch in closing parens and braces are the only problems with this code. Please fix. – Christoffer Lette Aug 23 '12 at 17:13
6

You can also use extend (the way you create jQuery plugins):

$.fn.extend(
{
    myfunction: function () 
    {
    },

    myfunction2: function () 
    {
    }
});

Usage:

$('#my_div').myfunction();
5

You can write your own jQuery plugins(function which can be called on selected elements) like below:

(function( $ ){
    $.fn.myFunc = function(param1, param2){
        //this - jquery object holds your selected elements
    }
})( jQuery );


Call it later like:

$('div').myFunc(1, null);
4

Yes, methods you apply to elements selected using jquery, are called jquery plugins and there is a good amount of info on authoring within the jquery docs.

Its worth noting that jquery is just javascript, so there is nothing special about a "jquery method".

  • 1
    'there is nothing special about a "jquery method"' - Yes there is: a "jQuery method" works on a jQuery object. (But yes, jQuery is just JS...) – nnnnnn Aug 23 '12 at 13:57
3

You can always do this:

jQuery.fn.extend({
   myfunction: function(param){
       // code here
   },
});
OR
jQuery.extend({
   myfunction: function(param){
       // code here
   },
});
$(element).myfunction(param);
2

It sounds like you want to extend the jQuery object via it's prototype (aka write a jQuery plugin). This would mean that every new object created through calling the jQuery function ($(selector/DOM element)) would have this method.

Here is a very simple example:

$.fn.myFunction = function () {
    alert('it works');
};

Demo

2

Create a "colorize" method:

$.fn.colorize = function custom_colorize(some_color) {
    this.css('color', some_color);
    return this;
}

Use it:

$('#my_div').colorize('green');

This simple-ish example combines the best of How to Create a Basic Plugin in the jQuery docs, and answers from @Candide, @Michael.

1

Simplest example to making any function in jQuery is

jQuery.fn.extend({
    exists: function() { return this.length }
});

if($(selector).exists()){/*do something here*/}

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