1

I'm writing a query that uses FirstOrDefault after an OrderBy query, which should check if it isn't null first then use some data in it. Is there a better way than writing it like this:

int count = db.Items.Count(i => 
          i.Assignments.OrderByDescending(a => 
                a.DateAssigned).FirstOrDefault() != null
          && 
          i.Assignments.OrderByDescending(a =>
                a.DateAssigned).FirstOrDefault().DateReturned == null)

What this code does is there are items that has many assignments, I take the latest assignment by date, then check if it exist, then run a condition on a property (DateReturned). As you see, this query is long, and most of my queries seem to look like this where I check for null first then run a second query on it using their properties. Is there a better way of doing this?

4
  • 1
    What is itemsQuery? Basically, is this in LINQ to Objects or something else?
    – Jon Skeet
    Aug 23 '12 at 17:06
  • 1
    When you do have long LINQ queries like that you can add some line breaks in there to make it actually readable...
    – Servy
    Aug 23 '12 at 17:07
  • 1
    And some indentation would also be good.
    – L.B
    Aug 23 '12 at 17:11
  • If you use VB.NET, you wouldn't need to do .OrderByDes and include predicates, you can just use the OrderBy preserved keyword followed by ASC or DES preserved keywords and then say "Is Nothing" and for the second part "IsNot Nothing", so much more beautiful :) Sep 19 '13 at 9:14
8

Just call .Any(a => a.DateReturned == null) to check whether there are any items that meet the condition.

If you only want to check the latest assignment, add .Take(1) before the .Any().

0
1

My take:

int count = 
itemsQuery.Select(i => i.Assignments.OrderByDescending(a => a.DateAssigned))
          .Count(i => i.FirstOrDefault() != null &&  
                      i.First().DateReturned == null);
1
  • EF does not accept a lambda expression with an anonymous delegate because it cannot be converted to an expression tree. Aug 23 '12 at 17:18
0

You can put the result in a variable to avoid doing the same thing twice:

int count = itemsQuery.Count(i => {
  var f = i.Assignments.OrderByDescending(a => a.DateAssigned).FirstOrDefault();
  return f != null && f.DateReturned == null;
});
1
  • EF does not accept a lambda expression with an anonymous delegate because it cannot be converted to an expression tree. Aug 23 '12 at 17:21

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