109

I need a regular expression that validates a number, but doesn't require a digit after the decimal. ie.

123
123.
123.4

would all be valid

123..

would be invalid

Any would be greatly appreciated!

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15 Answers 15

182

Use the following:

/^\d*\.?\d*$/
  • ^ - Beginning of the line;
  • \d* - 0 or more digits;
  • \.? - An optional dot (escaped, because in regex, . is a special character);
  • \d* - 0 or more digits (the decimal part);
  • $ - End of the line.

This allows for .5 decimal rather than requiring the leading zero, such as 0.5

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  • 2
    @OrangeDog, your original matches more than might be desired. e.g. 'cow3.45tornado' ;) – S. Albano Aug 24 '12 at 21:50
  • 39
    It also matches a single dot which is not a valid decimal number. A better regex would be /^\d*\.?\d+$/ which would force a digit after a decimal point. – Chandranshu Nov 12 '13 at 6:16
  • 2
    @Chandranshu and it matches an empty string, which your change would also solve. – OGHaza Nov 22 '13 at 14:29
  • 2
    @Chandranshu "doesn't require a digit after the decimal" – OrangeDog Dec 23 '14 at 16:36
  • 3
    This solution doesn't work. It requires decimals while OP clearly says: optional decimals. – Alex G Oct 22 '17 at 23:32
111
/\d+\.?\d*/

One or more digits (\d+), optional period (\.?), zero or more digits (\d*).

Depending on your usage or regex engine you may need to add start/end line anchors:

/^\d+\.?\d*$/

Regular expression visualization

Debuggex Demo

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  • 12
    Yeah, but the top voted answer is wrong, it matches both . and the empty string. – OrangeDog Dec 23 '14 at 16:38
  • 1
    @Gangnus Nor does it say that ".digit" should be matched. If they wanted that, then they should have said. – OrangeDog Jul 28 '17 at 9:25
  • 2
    @EqualityInTech I'm pretty sure it's not - it has no grouping at all. – OrangeDog May 17 '18 at 15:45
  • 1
    Hmm... I think I might not fully understand evil regexes like I thought I did. Sorry. – JDB still remembers Monica May 17 '18 at 15:49
  • 1
    @AlexanderRyanBaggett this matches exactly what the question specified. As you can see it doesn't include - at all. – OrangeDog Oct 21 '19 at 13:24
74

You need a regular expression like the following to do it properly:

/^[+-]?((\d+(\.\d*)?)|(\.\d+))$/

The same expression with whitespace, using the extended modifier (as supported by Perl):

/^  [+-]? ( (\d+ (\.\d*)?)  |  (\.\d+) ) $/x

or with comments:

/^           # Beginning of string
 [+-]?       # Optional plus or minus character
 (           # Followed by either:
   (           #   Start of first option
     \d+       #   One or more digits
     (\.\d*)?  #   Optionally followed by: one decimal point and zero or more digits
   )           #   End of first option
   |           # or
   (\.\d+)     #   One decimal point followed by one or more digits
 )           # End of grouping of the OR options
 $           # End of string (i.e. no extra characters remaining)
 /x          # Extended modifier (allows whitespace & comments in regular expression)

For example, it will match:

  • 123
  • 23.45
  • 34.
  • .45
  • -123
  • -273.15
  • -42.
  • -.45
  • +516
  • +9.8
  • +2.
  • +.5

And will reject these non-numbers:

  • . (single decimal point)
  • -. (negative decimal point)
  • +. (plus decimal point)
  • (empty string)

The simpler solutions can incorrectly reject valid numbers or match these non-numbers.

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  • 1
    Best because it matches a number followed by a period (42.). However there is a bug/false positive as it matches this: 3....3 which can be fixed by adding two more parenthesis to enforce ^$ beginning and end characters: /^([+-]?(\d+(\.\d*)?)|(\.\d+))$/ – Pete Alvin Aug 25 '14 at 13:14
  • 1
    Thanks Pete, well spotted. The answer has now been corrected, by adding extra parenthesis so it behaves as intended. It is now written like ^A?(B|C)$. Previously, it was written like ^A?B|C$ which actually means (^A?B)|(C$) which was incorrect. Note: ^(A?B|C)$ is also incorrect, because it actually means ^((A?B)|(C))$ which would not match "+.5". – Hoylen Sep 7 '14 at 13:16
  • 2
    This is the best answer. The other answers don't handle all cases. I do a similar thing myself except that I use a lookahead to handle the missing-digit cases: /^[+-]?(?=\d|\.\d)\d*(\.\d*)?$/ – PhilHarvey Apr 23 '15 at 17:38
  • 1
    That is the only correct regex here. But some people would disagreee with "34.". I would propose + after second d instead of * – Gangnus Jul 28 '17 at 8:48
  • 1
    This also matches 0000.2, which is probably not what's desired. – Aaron Zorel Oct 8 '19 at 5:32
11

Try this regex:

\d+\.?\d*

\d+ digits before optional decimal
.? optional decimal(optional due to the ? quantifier)
\d* optional digits after decimal

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  • 1
    Nope, that one does not match 123. – Bart Kiers Aug 24 '12 at 21:44
  • 1
    Thanks for the note. Modified my regex. – Kash Aug 24 '12 at 21:46
  • 4
    Indeed, but now you just edited it into what is already posted by someone else. Consider just removing yet another "correct" answer. – Bart Kiers Aug 24 '12 at 21:48
8

I think this is the best one because it matches all requirements:

^\d+(\\.\d+)?$
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  • 1
    For me this is the best answer, since the string: "4." (for example) is not a valid number at least in ruby language. However, the most upvoted answers accepts "4." as a number regex, which is wrong. – Victor Jul 9 '18 at 7:45
3

I ended up using the following:

^\d*\.?\d+$

This makes the following invalid:

.
3.
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  • You might need slashes depending on which language you're using. For example: /^\d*\.?\d+$/ – Charles Naccio Feb 11 '15 at 22:25
  • this will allow .3 – Royi Namir Mar 2 '15 at 19:11
2

What language? In Perl style: ^\d+(\.\d*)?$

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2

This is what I did. It's more strict than any of the above (and more correct than some):

^0$|^[1-9]\d*$|^\.\d+$|^0\.\d*$|^[1-9]\d*\.\d*$

Strings that passes:

0
0.
1
123
123.
123.4
.0
.0123
.123
0.123
1.234
12.34

Strings that fails:

.
00000
01
.0.
..
00.123
02.134
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2

you can use this:

^\d+(\.\d)?\d*$

matches:
11
11.1
0.2

does not match:
.2
2.
2.6.9

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  • Thanks, very simple and matches what I need – Hany Nov 6 '18 at 10:13
2
^[+-]?(([1-9][0-9]*)?[0-9](\.[0-9]*)?|\.[0-9]+)$

should reflect what people usually think of as a well formed decimal number.

The digits before the decimal point can be either a single digit, in which case it can be from 0 to 9, or more than one digits, in which case it cannot start with a 0.

If there are any digits present before the decimal sign, then the decimal and the digits following it are optional. Otherwise, a decimal has to be present followed by at least one digit. Note that multiple trailing 0's are allowed after the decimal point.

grep -E '^[+-]?(([1-9][0-9]*)?[0-9](\.[0-9]*)?|\.[0-9]+)$'

correctly matches the following:

9
0
10
10.
0.
0.0
0.100
0.10
0.01
10.0
10.10
.0
.1
.00
.100
.001

as well as their signed equivalents, whereas it rejects the following:

.
00
01
00.0
01.3

and their signed equivalents, as well as the empty string.

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1
(?<![^d])\d+(?:\.\d+)?(?![^d])

clean and simple.

This uses Suffix and Prefix, RegEx features.

It directly returns true - false for IsMatch condition

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1
^\d+(()|(\.\d+)?)$

Came up with this. Allows both integer and decimal, but forces a complete decimal (leading and trailing numbers) if you decide to enter a decimal.

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1

What you asked is already answered so this is just an additional info for those who want only 2 decimal digits if optional decimal point is entered:

^\d+(\.\d{2})?$

^ : start of the string
\d : a digit (equal to [0-9])
+ : one and unlimited times

Capturing Group (.\d{2})?
? : zero and one times . : character .
\d : a digit (equal to [0-9])
{2} : exactly 2 times
$ : end of the string

1 : match
123 : match
123.00 : match
123. : no match
123.. : no match
123.0 : no match
123.000 : no match
123.00.00 : no match

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  • Does this match negative numbers? – Alexander Ryan Baggett Oct 21 '19 at 13:22
  • 1
    @AlexanderRyanBaggett you need to check for the negative sign so it would be: ^-?\d+(\.\d{2})?$ – PersyJack Oct 25 '19 at 14:34
0

In Perl, use Regexp::Common which will allow you to assemble a finely-tuned regular expression for your particular number format. If you are not using Perl, the generated regular expression can still typically be used by other languages.

Printing the result of generating the example regular expressions in Regexp::Common::Number:

$ perl -MRegexp::Common=number -E 'say $RE{num}{int}'
(?:(?:[-+]?)(?:[0123456789]+))

$ perl -MRegexp::Common=number -E 'say $RE{num}{real}'
(?:(?i)(?:[-+]?)(?:(?=[.]?[0123456789])(?:[0123456789]*)(?:(?:[.])(?:[0123456789]{0,}))?)(?:(?:[E])(?:(?:[-+]?)(?:[0123456789]+))|))

$ perl -MRegexp::Common=number -E 'say $RE{num}{real}{-base=>16}'
(?:(?i)(?:[-+]?)(?:(?=[.]?[0123456789ABCDEF])(?:[0123456789ABCDEF]*)(?:(?:[.])(?:[0123456789ABCDEF]{0,}))?)(?:(?:[G])(?:(?:[-+]?)(?:[0123456789ABCDEF]+))|))
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0

try this. ^[0-9]\d{0,9}(\.\d{1,3})?%?$ it is tested and worked for me.

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