85

I have a dict and would like to remove all the keys for which there are empty value strings.

metadata = {u'Composite:PreviewImage': u'(Binary data 101973 bytes)',
            u'EXIF:CFAPattern2': u''}

What is the best way to do this?

15 Answers 15

142

Python 2.X

dict((k, v) for k, v in metadata.iteritems() if v)

Python 3.X

{k: v for k, v in metadata.items() if v is not None}

Note that all of your keys have values. It's just that some of those values are the empty string. There's no such thing as a key in a dict without a value; if it didn't have a value, it wouldn't be in the dict.

  • 21
    +1. It's important to note that this does not actually remove the keys from an existing dictionary. Rather, it creates a new dictionary. Usually this is exactly what someone wants and is probably what the OP needs, but it is not what the OP asked for. – Steven Rumbalski Aug 25 '12 at 3:06
  • 1
    That's true, good point. – BrenBarn Aug 25 '12 at 16:54
  • 17
    This also kills v=0, which is fine, if that is what is wanted. – Paul Nov 15 '14 at 10:23
  • 3
    @shredding: You mean .items(). – BrenBarn Nov 14 '16 at 18:54
  • 5
    For later versions of python you should also use the dictionary generator: {k: v for k, v in metadata.items() if v is not None} – Schiavini Jan 25 '17 at 13:31
66

It can get even shorter than BrenBarn's solution (and more readable I think)

{k: v for k, v in metadata.items() if v}

Tested with Python 2.7.3.

  • 12
    This also kills zero values. – Paul Nov 15 '14 at 10:22
  • 9
    To preserve 0 (zero) you can use ... if v!=None like so: {k: v for k, v in metadata.items() if v!=None} – Dannid Apr 2 '15 at 16:09
  • 1
    {k: v for k, v in metadata.items() if v!=None} doesn't get rid of empty strings. – philgo20 Oct 1 '15 at 21:07
  • 1
    dictionary comprehensions is supported only with Python 2.7+ for compatibility with prior versions please use @BrenBarn's solution. – Pavan Gupta Oct 24 '15 at 18:51
  • 12
    Should always compare None with, 'is not', instead of '!='. stackoverflow.com/a/14247419/2368836 – rocktheartsm4l Apr 12 '16 at 23:11
18

If you really need to modify the original dictionary:

empty_keys = [k for k,v in metadata.iteritems() if not v]
for k in empty_keys:
    del metadata[k]

Note that we have to make a list of the empty keys because we can't modify a dictionary while iterating through it (as you may have noticed). This is less expensive (memory-wise) than creating a brand-new dictionary, though, unless there are a lot of entries with empty values.

  • this will also remove value 0 and 0 is not empty – JVK May 21 '16 at 22:29
  • If you are using Python 3+ you have to replace .iteritems() with .items(), the first doesn't work anymore in latest Python versions. – Mariano Ruiz Dec 18 '17 at 18:33
11

If you want a full-featured, yet succinct approach to handling real-world data structures which are often nested, and can even contain cycles, I recommend looking at the remap utility from the boltons utility package.

After pip install boltons or copying iterutils.py into your project, just do:

from boltons.iterutils import remap

drop_falsey = lambda path, key, value: bool(value)
clean = remap(metadata, visit=drop_falsey)

This page has many more examples, including ones working with much larger objects from Github's API.

It's pure-Python, so it works everywhere, and is fully tested in Python 2.7 and 3.3+. Best of all, I wrote it for exactly cases like this, so if you find a case it doesn't handle, you can bug me to fix it right here.

  • 1
    This solution worked great for a similar problem i had: stripping empty values from deeply nested lists inside of dictionaries. Thanks! – Nicholas Tulach Apr 19 '17 at 20:22
  • 1
    This is good, as you are not reinventing the wheel, and providing a solution for nested objects. Thanks! – vekerdyb Aug 21 '18 at 11:15
  • 1
    I really liked the article you wrote for your library, and this is a useful library! – lifelogger Oct 13 '18 at 4:55
8

BrenBarn's solution is ideal (and pythonic, I might add). Here is another (fp) solution, however:

from operator import itemgetter
dict(filter(itemgetter(1), metadata.items()))
8

Based on Ryan's solution, if you also have lists and nested dictionaries:

For Python 2:

def remove_empty_from_dict(d):
    if type(d) is dict:
        return dict((k, remove_empty_from_dict(v)) for k, v in d.iteritems() if v and remove_empty_from_dict(v))
    elif type(d) is list:
        return [remove_empty_from_dict(v) for v in d if v and remove_empty_from_dict(v)]
    else:
        return d

For Python 3:

def remove_empty_from_dict(d):
    if type(d) is dict:
        return dict((k, remove_empty_from_dict(v)) for k, v in d.items() if v and remove_empty_from_dict(v))
    elif type(d) is list:
        return [remove_empty_from_dict(v) for v in d if v and remove_empty_from_dict(v)]
    else:
        return d
  • 1
    Ha, nice extension! It is a good solution for dictionaries like the following: d = { "things": [{ "name": "" }] } – Ryan Jul 22 '14 at 23:07
6

If you have a nested dictionary, and you want this to work even for empty sub-elements, you can use a recursive variant of BrenBarn's suggestion:

def scrub_dict(d):
    if type(d) is dict:
        return dict((k, scrub_dict(v)) for k, v in d.iteritems() if v and scrub_dict(v))
    else:
        return d
  • Use items() instead of iteritems() for Python 3 – andydavies Sep 24 '18 at 11:14
4

Building on the answers from patriciasz and nneonneo, and accounting for the possibility that you might want to delete keys that have only certain falsy things (e.g. '') but not others (e.g. 0), or perhaps you even want to include some truthy things (e.g. 'SPAM'), then you could make a highly specific hitlist:

unwanted = ['', u'', None, False, [], 'SPAM']

Unfortunately, this doesn't quite work, because for example 0 in unwanted evaluates to True. We need to discriminate between 0 and other falsy things, so we have to use is:

any([0 is i for i in unwanted])

...evaluates to False.

Now use it to del the unwanted things:

unwanted_keys = [k for k, v in metadata.items() if any([v is i for i in unwanted])]
for k in unwanted_keys: del metadata[k]

If you want a new dictionary, instead of modifying metadata in place:

newdict = {k: v for k, v in metadata.items() if not any([v is i for i in unwanted])}
  • really nice shot, it address many problems at once and it solves the question, thank you to make it clear – jlandercy Apr 29 '16 at 7:14
4

Quick Answer (TL;DR)

Example01

### example01 -------------------

mydict  =   { "alpha":0,
              "bravo":"0",
              "charlie":"three",
              "delta":[],
              "echo":False,
              "foxy":"False",
              "golf":"",
              "hotel":"   ",                        
            }
newdict =   dict([(vkey, vdata) for vkey, vdata in mydict.iteritems() if(vdata) ])
print newdict

### result01 -------------------
result01 ='''
{'foxy': 'False', 'charlie': 'three', 'bravo': '0'}
'''

Detailed Answer

Problem

  • Context: Python 2.x
  • Scenario: Developer wishes modify a dictionary to exclude blank values
    • aka remove empty values from a dictionary
    • aka delete keys with blank values
    • aka filter dictionary for non-blank values over each key-value pair

Solution

  • example01 use python list-comprehension syntax with simple conditional to remove "empty" values

Pitfalls

  • example01 only operates on a copy of the original dictionary (does not modify in place)
  • example01 may produce unexpected results depending on what developer means by "empty"
    • Does developer mean to keep values that are falsy?
    • If the values in the dictionary are not gauranteed to be strings, developer may have unexpected data loss.
    • result01 shows that only three key-value pairs were preserved from the original set

Alternate example

  • example02 helps deal with potential pitfalls
  • The approach is to use a more precise definition of "empty" by changing the conditional.
  • Here we only want to filter out values that evaluate to blank strings.
  • Here we also use .strip() to filter out values that consist of only whitespace.

Example02

### example02 -------------------

mydict  =   { "alpha":0,
              "bravo":"0",
              "charlie":"three",
              "delta":[],
              "echo":False,
              "foxy":"False",
              "golf":"",
              "hotel":"   ",
            }
newdict =   dict([(vkey, vdata) for vkey, vdata in mydict.iteritems() if(str(vdata).strip()) ])
print newdict

### result02 -------------------
result02 ='''
{'alpha': 0,
  'bravo': '0', 
  'charlie': 'three', 
  'delta': [],
  'echo': False,
  'foxy': 'False'
  }
'''

See also

3

For python 3

dict((k, v) for k, v in metadata.items() if v)
0

An alternative way you can do this, is using dictionary comprehension. This should be compatible with 2.7+

result = {
    key: value for key, value in
    {"foo": "bar", "lorem": None}.items()
    if value
}
0

I read all replies in this thread and some referred also to this thread: Remove empty dicts in nested dictionary with recursive function

I originally used solution here and it worked great:

Attempt 1: Too Hot (not performant or future-proof): def scrub_dict(d): if type(d) is dict: return dict((k, scrub_dict(v)) for k, v in d.iteritems() if v and scrub_dict(v)) else: return d

But some performance and compatibility concerns were raised in Python 2.7 world:

  1. use isinstance instead of type
  2. unroll the list comp into for loop for efficiency
  3. use python3 safe items instead of iteritems

Attempt 2: Too Cold (Lacks Memoization): def scrub_dict(d): new_dict = {} for k, v in d.items(): if isinstance(v,dict): v = scrub_dict(v) if not v in (u'', None, {}): new_dict[k] = v return new_dict

DOH! This is not recursive and not at all memoizant.

Attempt 3: Just Right (so far): def scrub_dict(d): new_dict = {} for k, v in d.items(): if isinstance(v,dict): v = scrub_dict(v) if not v in (u'', None, {}): new_dict[k] = v return new_dict

0

Here is an option if you are using pandas:

import pandas as pd

d = dict.fromkeys(['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'])
d['b'] = 'not null'
d['c'] = ''  # empty string

print(d)

# convert `dict` to `Series` and replace any blank strings with `None`;
# use the `.dropna()` method and
# then convert back to a `dict`
d_ = pd.Series(d).replace('', None).dropna().to_dict()

print(d_)
0

Some of Methods mentioned above ignores if there are any integers and float with values 0 & 0.0

If someone wants to avoid the above can use below code(removes empty strings and None values from nested dictionary and nested list):

def remove_empty_from_dict(d):
    if type(d) is dict:
        _temp = {}
        for k,v in d.items():
            if v == None or v == "":
                pass
            elif type(v) is int or type(v) is float:
                _temp[k] = remove_empty_from_dict(v)
            elif (v or remove_empty_from_dict(v)):
                _temp[k] = remove_empty_from_dict(v)
        return _temp
    elif type(d) is list:
        return [remove_empty_from_dict(v) for v in d if( (str(v).strip() or str(remove_empty_from_dict(v)).strip()) and (v != None or remove_empty_from_dict(v) != None))]
    else:
        return d
-2

Some benchmarking:

1. List comprehension recreate dict

In [7]: %%timeit dic = {str(i):i for i in xrange(10)}; dic['10'] = None; dic['5'] = None
   ...: dic = {k: v for k, v in dic.items() if v is not None} 
   1000000 loops, best of 7: 375 ns per loop

2. List comprehension recreate dict using dict()

In [8]: %%timeit dic = {str(i):i for i in xrange(10)}; dic['10'] = None; dic['5'] = None
   ...: dic = dict((k, v) for k, v in dic.items() if v is not None)
1000000 loops, best of 7: 681 ns per loop

3. Loop and delete key if v is None

In [10]: %%timeit dic = {str(i):i for i in xrange(10)}; dic['10'] = None; dic['5'] = None
    ...: for k, v in dic.items():
    ...:   if v is None:
    ...:     del dic[k]
    ...: 
10000000 loops, best of 7: 160 ns per loop

so loop and delete is the fastest at 160ns, list comprehension is half as slow at ~375ns and with a call to dict() is half as slow again ~680ns.

Wrapping 3 into a function brings it back down again to about 275ns. Also for me PyPy was about twice as fast as neet python.

  • Loop and delete may also throw a RunTimeError, since it is not valid to modify a dictionary while iterating a view. docs.python.org/3/library/stdtypes.html s4.10.1 – Airsource Ltd Jun 16 '17 at 12:53
  • ah man yeah ok in python 3 that is true but not in python 2.7 as items returns a list, so you have to call list(dic.items()) in py 3. Dict comprehension ftw then? del still seems faster for a low ratio of Null/empty values. I guess building that list is just as bad for memory consumption than just recreating the dict. – Richard Mathie Nov 28 '17 at 11:48

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