9

Check this program

ifstream filein("Hey.txt");
filein.getline(line,99);
cout<<line<<endl;
filein.getline(line,99);
cout<<line<<endl;
filein.close();

The file Hey.txt has alot of characters in it. Well over a 1000

But my question is Why in the second time i try to print line. It doesnt get print?

11

According to the C++ reference (here) getline sets the ios::fail when count-1 characters have been extracted. You would have to call filein.clear(); in between the getline() calls.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Some explanation of your answer would be great. What is ios::fail and what is going on :D – Mohamed Ahmed Nabil Aug 26 '12 at 20:21
  • 2
    i like people like you, Pushing me forward like that. Thanks again – Mohamed Ahmed Nabil Aug 26 '12 at 20:32
  • There are several bits that keep track of the internal state of a stream defined in std::ios_base: goodbit, badbit, failbit, eofbit. When any of the 'bad' bits are set, the stream stops reading and evaluates to false (e.g., used as a while condition). That is why Kerrek SB suggested to use the while loop. – Roman Kutlak Aug 26 '12 at 20:45
  • The bits only affect the stream. Nothing really happens to the file. – Roman Kutlak Aug 27 '12 at 9:03
42

The idiomatic way to read lines from a stream is thus:

{
    std::ifstream filein("Hey.txt");

    for (std::string line; std::getline(filein, line); )
    {
        std::cout << line << std::endl;
    }
}

Note:

  • No close(). C++ takes care of resource management for you when used idiomatically.

  • Use the free std::getline, not the stream member function.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This actually isnt helping my problem at all – Mohamed Ahmed Nabil Aug 26 '12 at 20:03
  • @MohamedAhmedNabil: You never check the return value of your input operations, so it's entirely impossible to tell what your program is doing. – Kerrek SB Aug 26 '12 at 20:11
  • The first time i print out line, it prints out the first 99 chars, but the next time i do that it prints out nothing – Mohamed Ahmed Nabil Aug 26 '12 at 20:14
  • 5
    The problem is that it is considered a failure if there is no newline within the 98 characters and, thus, the stream is put into failure mode, i.e., std::ios_base::failbit is set. With this bit set the stream won't extract any characters. Strangely, though, it modifies the character array to store a null character into the next, i.e., the first location. – Dietmar Kühl Aug 26 '12 at 20:36
  • 2
    This thus is the most idiomatic way one deals with the stream. – Michael Apr 7 at 3:20
1

As Kerrek SB said correctly There is 2 possibilities: 1) Second line is an empty line 2) there is no second line and all more than 1000 character is in one line, so second getline has nothing to get.

| improve this answer | |
  • actually even if it was one line, getline should continue where it left off – Mohamed Ahmed Nabil Aug 26 '12 at 20:25
1
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main() 
{
ifstream in;
string lastLine1;
string lastLine2;
in.open("input.txt");
while(in.good()){
    getline(in,lastLine1);
    getline(in,lastLine2);
}
in.close();
if(lastLine2=="")
    cout<<lastLine1<<endl;
else
    cout<<lastLine2<<endl;
return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply. – Adrian Mole May 21 at 20:00

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