10

What's happening here?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(){

    int x=0,y=0;
    true? ++x, ++y : --x, --y; 
    cout << "x: " << x << endl;
    cout << "y: " << y << endl; //why does y=0 here?

    x=0,y=0;
    false ? ++x, ++y : --x, --y; 
    cout << "x: " << x << endl;
    cout << "y: " << y << endl;
}

x: 1
y: 0

x: -1
y: -1

The second case seems fine. I would expect both x and y to increment to 1 in the first case but only the left hand operand increments.

8
  • Please provide code that actually compiles - otherwise I cannot be bothered to help you Aug 27 '12 at 4:18
  • 1
    @AdrianCornish This code compiles; did you try it? Aug 27 '12 at 4:21
  • 2
    @chrisaycock actually it doesn't. Maybe it does if you add #include <iostream> and using std::cout; using std::endl;
    – obataku
    Aug 27 '12 at 4:21
  • 2
    Yes. The OP should read sscce.org, but still this is above average in terms of clarity and detail. Aug 27 '12 at 4:22
  • 3
    In a question with code that uses cout, #include <iostream> and using namespace std; are just noise. If that's all that is missing, and the reader can't figure out how to get it to compile, s/he has no business answering C++ questions. Aug 27 '12 at 5:55
20

The first one is equivalent to:

(true  ? (++x, ++y) : (--x)), --y; 

The second one is equivalent to:

(false ? (++x, ++y) : (--x)), --y; 

Thus the --y is always executed. In the first line, the increments are executed first so x = 1, y = 0 is expected. In the second line, the decrement of x is executed first so x = -1, y = -1 is expected.


As noted in a comment (to another answer) by Barmar:

And in case anyone is wondering why the comma between ++x and ++y doesn't have the same effect, it's because (true? ++x) would not be valid at all. So the compiler keeps scanning until it finds the :, but beyond that it stops when it reaches a lower precedence operator [(, in this example) or the end of statement].

1
  • 1
    To state your final paragraph more precisely: precedence (and associativity) of operators only affects binding of the operands at the left and right of the operator, not the one in the middle. Of course the ternary operator is the only one to have a middle operand at all in the first place. But along these lines one might consider a pair of parentheses as a unary (identity) operator whose single operand is in the middle (between the "operator symbols"), which would explain why the grouping it achieves is unaffected by any precedence rules. Apr 18 '14 at 14:02
4

The y is zero because comma has the lowest precedence among all C++ operators. Because its precedence is lower than that of the ternary conditional operator, the conditional operators are parsed as true? ++x, ++y : --x and false? ++x, ++y : --x. In both cases, the --y statement is executed unconditionally.

EDIT The first comma is different because the compiler has found a ?, so now it needs a : to complete the "when true" expression of the conditional. That is why both ++x and ++y are taken in.

2
  • 4
    And in case anyone is wondering why the comma between ++x and ++y doesn't have the same effect, it's because (true? ++x) would not be valid at all. So it keeps scanning until it finds the :, but beyond that it stops when it reaches a lower precedence operator.
    – Barmar
    Aug 27 '12 at 4:27
  • 1
    Oh and never do if(x==100,000) learnt that the hard way ;-) Aug 27 '12 at 4:30
0

Read the standard

§5.18 Comma operator [expr.comma]

¶1 The comma operator groups left-to-right.

expression:
assignment-expression
expression , assignment-expression

A pair of expressions separated by a comma is evaluated left-to-right; the left expression is a discardedvalue expression (Clause 5).83 Every value computation and side effect associated with the left expression is sequenced before every value computation and side effect associated with the right expression. The type and value of the result are the type and value of the right operand; the result is of the same value category as its right operand, and is a bit-field if its right operand is a glvalue and a bit-field.

¶2 In contexts where comma is given a special meaning, [ Example: in lists of arguments to functions (5.2.2) and lists of initializers (8.5) —end example ] the comma operator as described in Clause 5 can appear only in parentheses. [ Example:

f(a, (t=3, t+2), c);

has three arguments, the second of which has the value 5. —end example ]

2
  • Thanks. true? (++x, ++y) : (--x, --y); fixed. Lesson: always use parenthesis where intent is non trivial.
    – hhbilly
    Aug 27 '12 at 4:46
  • 2
    @user1626720 - not to mention "don't abuse the ternary operator". The code in question should be written with if ... else, since the value of the ternary operator is discarded. Aug 27 '12 at 11:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.