32

I have created an abstract base class, which has a pure virtual method with default argument.

class Base {
    ...
    virtual someMethod(const SomeStruct& t = 0) = 0;
    ...
}

class Derived : public Base {
    ...
    virtual someMethod(const SomeStruct& t = 0);
    ...
}

So I would like to know is it a good practice to set the default argument to pure virtual and overall to virtual methods?

4
  • 3
    I think you meant const SomeStruct* t = 0?
    – marcinj
    Aug 27, 2012 at 10:00
  • 4
    @luskan: SomeStruct could be implicitly convertible from 0.
    – CB Bailey
    Aug 27, 2012 at 10:01
  • What do you mean by "set the default argument to pure virutal"?
    – CB Bailey
    Aug 27, 2012 at 10:02
  • my Derived class someMethod should have default argument, which is the implmentation of pure virtual interface from Base class. by setting default argument to pure virtual method I mean just what I wrote in example.
    – deimus
    Aug 27, 2012 at 10:08

5 Answers 5

41

Actually, your code is one of worst possible usage patterns for default parameters, as it involves both inheritance and polymorphic behavior. I support an advice to have a look at related Scott Meyers tip, but here is a short overview:

In case of polymorphic calls, default parameters are used according to declaration for static type, not dynamic one. It is logical as run-time has no idea of default parameters, but breaks any sane assumptions about polymorphic behavior. For example,

#include <cstdio>

class Base
{
        public:
                virtual void f(int a = 1)
                {
                        printf("Base::f(%d)\n", a);
                }
};

class Deriv : public Base
{
        public:
                virtual void f(int a = 2)
                {
                        printf("Deriv::f(%d)\n", a);
                }
};

int main()
{
        Base* a = new Deriv();
        a->f();
        delete a;
        return 0;
}

yields:

Deriv::f(1)
3
  • 2
    Good example that shows the pitfalls associated with this approach. May 18, 2015 at 14:21
  • 1
    But the question asked is about pure virtual methods in base class. Apr 22, 2021 at 18:31
  • I think the rationale still holds though. The derived class overrides the default value for the parameter, but due to the static type of a, we end up using the default value provided in the pure virtual declaration. Jun 18, 2021 at 14:59
24

I often wish to use both default parameters and virtual function as you do. The others have rightfully pointed out however that this leads to ambiguity and is generally not a good idea. There is a reasonably simple solution, one that I use. Give your virtual function a different name, make it protected, and then provide a public function with default parameters which calls it.

class Base {
protected:
    virtual void vSomeMethod(const SomeStruct& t ) = 0;
public:
    void someMethod( const SomeStruc& t = 0 )
    { vSomeMethod( t ); }
}

Derived classes simply override vSomeMethod and don't worry at all about the default parameters.

2
  • 4
    Rather than introducing another name "vSomeMethod", why not just use overloading? I.e. add a public non-virtual member function void someMethod() to Base that calls someMethod(0);. In the more general case where you want a virtual member function f(xn,...,x1,x0) that can be called with n+1 default parameter values, xn=vn,...,x1=v1,x0=v0, the virtual overload of f could have no defaults, and there could be a non-virtual overload with n default parameters f(xn=vn,...,x1=v1) that calls f(xn,...,x1,v0).
    – Ose
    Jul 31, 2014 at 11:28
  • 3
    @Ose The reason to use a separately named implementation function instead of overloading the same name is because when you override the virtual implementation in the child class you hide the non-virtual helper in the parent, requiring you to additionally using that method into the child.
    – Mark B
    Nov 22, 2017 at 17:06
7

Don't use default parameters at all if possible, but if you do, never redefine them (see the text for details)

Buy both the Effective C++ books by Scott Meyers. You won't regret it.

3
  • I'm setting the same default values in both methods, I think your reference is about the ambiguouse situation when different values can be set as a default arguments.
    – deimus
    Aug 27, 2012 at 10:13
  • deimus, It does not matter really. Even if you think you will use always same values as default arguments, it is so easy to make a typo or just forget to mention a default argument. And debugging this kind of error will make your life really miserable with any proper code base. Aug 27, 2012 at 10:22
  • 2
    @deimus you cannot guarantee that someone in the future will not inherit from your base class and change the default value. Aug 27, 2012 at 10:36
0

I would:

  • define the virtual functions with the parameter (without default value)
  • define non virtual functions in the base class, without parameter at all, that call the virtual function passing the correct default parameter

This way the derived classes don't have to care about the default value at all.

0

If you want this code to make sense:

Base* p = new Derived;
p->someMethod();

since the static type of p is Base* it is the Base signature that is used on call. The default value is assigned and, being the function virtual, the call is redirected to Derived.

You can even have them defined differently, if you want your Derived::someMethod to receive a different value from Base* rather than Derived* ...

The important thing is document these "relations" well, since the most of programmers will not understood them from a simple reading of the code.

Of course, if all that is not suitable in you particular context, generating more confusion than else, avoid default parameters on virtual functions, and use helper non-virtual one to call them properly.

But considering also that -by a reader standpoint- a default parameter is more explicative than a overload function calling privately another with a not readable parameter rework.

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