129

I have a list like below where the first element is the id and the other is a string:

[(1, u'abc'), (2, u'def')]

I want to create a list of ids only from this list of tuples as below:

[1,2]

I'll use this list in __in so it needs to be a list of integer values.

183
>>> a = [(1, u'abc'), (2, u'def')]
>>> [i[0] for i in a]
[1, 2]
58

Use the zip function to decouple elements:

>>> inpt = [(1, u'abc'), (2, u'def')]
>>> unzipped = zip(*inpt)
>>> print unzipped
[(1, 2), (u'abc', u'def')]
>>> print list(unzipped[0])
[1, 2]

Edit (@BradSolomon): The above works for Python 2.x, where zip returns a list.

In Python 3.x, zip returns an iterator and the following is equivalent to the above:

>>> print(list(list(zip(*inpt))[0]))
[1, 2]
  • does this need a separate import? – JuliandotNut Jul 12 '15 at 9:13
  • 1
    @JuliandotNut No, it's a built-in function. (in Python 2.x) – WayneSan Jul 13 '15 at 11:18
18

do you mean something like this?

new_list = [ seq[0] for seq in yourlist ]

What you actually have is a list of tuple objects, not a list of sets (as your original question implied). If it is actually a list of sets, then there is no first element because sets have no order.

Here I've created a flat list because generally that seems more useful than creating a list of 1 element tuples. However, you can easily create a list of 1 element tuples by just replacing seq[0] with (seq[0],).

  • I tried it. It gives this error: int() argument must be a string or a number, not 'QuerySet' – wasimbhalli Aug 27 '12 at 12:50
  • 4
    @wasimbhalli -- int() is nowhere in my solution, so the exception you're seeing must come later on in the code. – mgilson Aug 27 '12 at 12:51
  • I've updated the question, I need to use this list later in __in for filtering data – wasimbhalli Aug 27 '12 at 12:53
  • what is __in? -- Based on the example input you've given, this will create a list of integers. However, if your list of tuples doesn't start with integers, then you won't get integers and you'll need to make them integers via int, or try to figure out why your first element can't be converted to an integer. – mgilson Aug 27 '12 at 12:53
  • Does new_list = [ seq[0] for seq in yourlist if type(seq[0]) == int] work? – pR0Ps Aug 27 '12 at 12:54
7

You can use "tuple unpacking":

>>> my_list = [(1, u'abc'), (2, u'def')]
>>> my_ids = [idx for idx, val in my_list]
>>> my_ids
[1, 2]

At iteration time each tuple is unpacked and its values are set to the variables idx and val.

>>> x = (1, u'abc')
>>> idx, val = x
>>> idx
1
>>> val
u'abc'
5

This is what operator.itemgetter is for.

>>> a = [(1, u'abc'), (2, u'def')]
>>> import operator
>>> b = map(operator.itemgetter(0), a)
>>> b
[1, 2]

The itemgetter statement returns a function that returns the index of the element you specify. It's exactly the same as writing

>>> b = map(lambda x: x[0], a)

But I find that itemgetter is a clearer and more explicit.

This is handy for making compact sort statements. For example,

>>> c = sorted(a, key=operator.itemgetter(0), reverse=True)
>>> c
[(2, u'def'), (1, u'abc')]
4

if the tuples are unique then this can work

>>> a = [(1, u'abc'), (2, u'def')]
>>> a
[(1, u'abc'), (2, u'def')]
>>> dict(a).keys()
[1, 2]
>>> dict(a).values()
[u'abc', u'def']
>>> 
  • 4
    This will lose the order. It may work with ordereddict, though. – Tim Tisdall Apr 15 '16 at 12:45
4

From a performance point of view, in python3.X

  • [i[0] for i in a] and list(zip(*a))[0] are equivalent
  • they are faster than list(map(operator.itemgetter(0), a))

Code

import timeit


iterations = 100000
init_time = timeit.timeit('''a = [(i, u'abc') for i in range(1000)]''', number=iterations)/iterations
print(timeit.timeit('''a = [(i, u'abc') for i in range(1000)]\nb = [i[0] for i in a]''', number=iterations)/iterations - init_time)
print(timeit.timeit('''a = [(i, u'abc') for i in range(1000)]\nb = list(zip(*a))[0]''', number=iterations)/iterations - init_time)

output

3.491014136001468e-05

3.422205176000717e-05

1

when I ran (as suggested above):

>>> a = [(1, u'abc'), (2, u'def')]
>>> import operator
>>> b = map(operator.itemgetter(0), a)
>>> b

instead of returning:

[1, 2]

I received this as the return:

<map at 0xb387eb8>

I found I had to use list():

>>> b = list(map(operator.itemgetter(0), a))

to successfully return a list using this suggestion. That said, I'm happy with this solution, thanks. (tested/run using Spyder, iPython console, Python v3.6)

0

Those are tuples, not sets. You can do this:

l1 = [(1, u'abc'), (2, u'def')]
l2 = [(tup[0],) for tup in l1]
l2
>>> [(1,), (2,)]
  • 1
    Not really what is being asked – Mad Physicist Sep 8 '14 at 23:44

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