98

I have a Class object. I want to determine if the type that the Class object represents implements a specific interface. I was wondering how this could be achieved?

I have the following code. Basically what it does is gets an array of all the classes in a specified package. I then want to go through the array and add the Class objects that implement an interface to my map. Problem is the isInstance() takes an object as a parameter. I can't instantiate an interface. So I am kind of at a loss with this. Any ideas?

Class[] classes = ClassUtils.getClasses(handlersPackage);
for(Class clazz : classes)
{
    if(clazz.isInstance(/*Some object*/)) //Need something in this if statement
    {
        retVal.put(clazz.getSimpleName(), clazz);
    }
}
0
236

You should use isAssignableFrom:

if (YourInterface.class.isAssignableFrom(clazz)) {
    ...
}
3
  • This works if the project is the same. But if you copy the interface code 1:1, make a new project and jar, then try to load that jar as a plugin, the call will return false. Comparing by name then "works", like Roddy posted. But I have no idea how to check this in the way Java eventually verifies the compatibility. By name is a dirty approach. Yours is fine, of course, if the project is the same. ................ MAYBE I'm doing it wrong: I create a URLClassLoader instance for the plugin file and load it like that. Maybe I should try a different class loader. Jul 19 '18 at 14:00
  • 4
    You're having class loading issues. If you load the same class twice with different class loaders, the two Class instances will not be compatible. You could see errors like java.lang.ClassCastException: com.my.CustomClass cannot be cast to com.my.CustomClass or something similarly inexplicable.
    – Flavio
    Jul 20 '18 at 11:57
  • I have by now tried various approaches, and in the end, it turned out that the main problem I had was this: While the interface in my plugin and main project were identical, they were not in the same place, so the namespace/address was a different one. Btw., I'm now using: myClassLoader = new URLClassLoader(new URL[] { candidateFile.toURI().toURL() }, LoadedPlugin.class.getClassLoader()); and classToLoad = Class.forName("com.blablabla.plugin.Main", true, myClassLoader); and instance = (MyIntf) classToLoad.newInstance(); Works like a charm. Jul 21 '18 at 13:16
18

you can use the below function to get all the implemented interfaces

Class[] intfs = clazz.getInterfaces();
10

You can use class.getInterfaces() and then check to see if the interface class is in there.

Class someInterface; // the interface you want to check for 
Class x; // 
Class[] interfaces = x.getInterfaces();

for (Class i : interfaces) {
    if (i.toString().equals(someInterface.toString()) {
        // if this is true, the class implements the interface you're looking for
    }
}
4
  • This approach will technically work, but the much simpler and cleaner approach is to use isAssignableFrom as Flavio mentions.
    – jwj
    Aug 16 '17 at 17:20
  • Yes, that's true, although your answer has been upvoted more than a few times and I thought it would be useful to add some context. While using isAssignableFrom is probably preferable, there might be instances where you need to scan the list of interfaces a class implements by looking at the names.
    – jwj
    Aug 16 '17 at 20:41
  • 1
    This actually doesn't work, getInterfaces() only works if the class implements the interface directly, if a superclass implements the interface, or a super interface extends it, that interface won't be returned by getInterfaces(). You need to traverse the tree of all super classes and interfaces in order to get all the interfaces that the class implements. Sep 28 '18 at 2:57
  • That wasn't the question though. Sep 28 '18 at 3:04
1

You can also set the instance adding ".class"

Class[] classes = ClassUtils.getClasses(handlersPackage);
for(Class clazz : classes)
{
    if(Interface.class.isAssignableFrom(clazz))
    {
        retVal.put(clazz.getSimpleName(), clazz);
    }
}
1
  • 2
    For anyone looking at this approach, please consider Flavio's answer. Note that the code in this example does a few things that might not make immediate sense: ClassUtils is not part of Java (it's in Guava or Spring and other frameworks), the term Interface as used above is meant to refer to a specific interface being tested (i.e., it's not a Java keyword in this context), and the purpose of retVal is not explained or mentioned anywhere.
    – jwj
    Aug 16 '17 at 17:23

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