11

Given an array say "bca", I need to find the number of permutations which are lexicographicaly greater than the given permutation.

Thus, in this example, cab, cba are permutations which are greater. Thus the answer would be 2.

I tried approaching the problem by finding the lexicographic ranking of the array, but am not able to devise an efficient algorithm for the say.

Any help/pointers in the right direction is appreciated!

  • Is "bbb" a valid array? – kilotaras Aug 27 '12 at 17:49
  • Have you tried a backtracking method?, it ain't actually efficient but it does its job. If you want me to post some code tell me. – Thanatos Aug 27 '12 at 17:57
  • @kilotaras: No. the permutation must be formed with the same number of literals as per the usual definition – user1628340 Aug 27 '12 at 18:38
  • @Thanatos: No I am not aware of the backtracking method. Can you please explain and post some code? Thanks! – user1628340 Aug 27 '12 at 18:39
  • @PaulTomblin - The question is essentially "What's an efficient algorithm to do X?". How can anyone answer that without (pseudo)code? – Xavier Holt Aug 27 '12 at 19:06
16

Let's look at the permutation dacb. Where does this come in lexicographic order among the 4! = 24 permutations of abcd?

  • Consider the first letter d. Among the remaining letters (acb) there are three letters smaller than d, and 3! = 6 permutations starting with each one of them, for a total of 18 permutations.
  • Consider the first two letters da. Among the remaining letters (cb) there are no letters smaller than a (if there were any there would be 2! = 2 permutations starting with d plus each one), for a total of 0 permutations.
  • Consider the first three letters dac. Among the remaining letters (b) there is one letter smaller than c, and 1! = 1 permutations starting with dab, for a total of 1 permutation.

So in total there are 19 permutations smaller than dacb. Let's check that.

>>> from itertools import permutations
>>> list(enumerate(''.join(p) for p in permutations('abcd')))
[(0, 'abcd'), (1, 'abdc'), (2, 'acbd'), (3, 'acdb'),
 (4, 'adbc'), (5, 'adcb'), (6, 'bacd'), (7, 'badc'),
 (8, 'bcad'), (9, 'bcda'), (10, 'bdac'), (11, 'bdca'),
 (12, 'cabd'), (13, 'cadb'), (14, 'cbad'), (15, 'cbda'),
 (16, 'cdab'), (17, 'cdba'), (18, 'dabc'), (19, 'dacb'),
 (20, 'dbac'), (21, 'dbca'), (22, 'dcab'), (23, 'dcba')]

Looks good. So there are 4! − 19 − 1 = 4 permutations that are greater than dacb.

It should be clear now how to generalize the method to make an algorithm. Here's an implementation in Python:

from math import factorial

def lexicographic_index(p):
    """
    Return the lexicographic index of the permutation `p` among all
    permutations of its elements. `p` must be a sequence and all elements
    of `p` must be distinct.

    >>> lexicographic_index('dacb')
    19
    >>> from itertools import permutations
    >>> all(lexicographic_index(p) == i
    ...     for i, p in enumerate(permutations('abcde')))
    True
    """
    result = 0
    for j in range(len(p)):
        k = sum(1 for i in p[j + 1:] if i < p[j])
        result += k * factorial(len(p) - j - 1)
    return result

def lexicographic_followers(p):
    """
    Return the number of permutations of `p` that are greater than `p`
    in lexicographic order. `p` must be a sequence and all elements
    of `p` must be distinct.
    """
    return factorial(len(p)) - lexicographic_index(p) - 1
  • Are you going to need this complexity? (Note, no downvote). – Paddy3118 Aug 28 '12 at 7:45
  • Using Your method, for "acbd" index would be 2: when in fact it is 3. "abdc" index is 2. – SSV Jun 2 '14 at 9:27
  • 1
    @SSV: abcd = 0, abdc = 1, acbd = 2. What's wrong with that? – Gareth Rees Jun 8 '14 at 8:56
  • For anyone who is interested, My implementation in C++ can be found here. – xuhdev Jun 7 '15 at 3:42
13

There is a very clean way to do this based on the factorial number system and Lehmer codes. The idea is to assign a numeric code to each possible permutation that encodes the order in which the values occur (the Lehmer code). You can then convert the Lehmer code into a number that determines the index of the permutation in the list of all permutations (this uses the factorial number system). Given the index of the permutation, you can then compute (n! - 1) and subtract out the index to determine how many more permutations there are.

If you're curious how to do this, I have an implementation of this algorithm that lets you map from permutations to indices or vice-versa. I also gave a talk on how to do this; the details are in the latter half of the slides.

Hope this helps!

  • Can this work for multisets also? If not, what can? – Anastasios Andronidis Mar 21 '16 at 11:42
  • I'm pretty sure this won't work for multisets. I'm not aware of a good answer for how to do this. You should definitely ask this as a question! – templatetypedef Mar 21 '16 at 17:40
0

Here is the Backtracking solution:

The program permutates all the solutions for the given string and it returns a list of solutions as well as how many here are.

Ex: for acb it returns:

c a b
c b a
b a c
b c a
4

Code:

#include <iostream>
#include <stdio>

using namespace std;

int v[100], n, cnt;
char *str;

void init(int k)
{
    v[k] = -1;
}

bool solutionReached( int k ) 
{
    if (k == n + 1)
        return true;
    return false;
}

void printSolution( int k ) 
{
    for (int i = 1; i < k; i++)
    {
        printf("%c ", str[v[i]]);
    }

    printf("\n");

    cnt++;
}

bool hasSuccesor( int k ) 
{
    if(v[k] < n - 1)
    {
        v[k]++;
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

bool isValid( int k ) 
{
    for (int i = 1; i < k; i++)
    {
        if (v[i] == v[k])
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    if (k == n)
    {
        char *cuv = (char *) malloc(n * sizeof(char));

        for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
            cuv[i] = str[v[i + 1]];

        if (strcmp(cuv, str) > 0)
        {
            return true;
        }
        else
            return false;
    }

    return true;
}

void bkt(int k)
{
    if(solutionReached(k))
        printSolution(k);
    else
    {
        init(k);
        while(hasSuccesor(k))
            if(isValid(k))
                bkt(k + 1);
    }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    str = "bca";

    n = strlen(str);
    bkt(1);

    printf("%i \n", --cnt);

    return 0;
}
-3

Straight-forward python solution relies on the fact that Pythons permutation generator will generate in lexicographic order from an initial sorted string.

In [68]: from itertools import permutations

In [69]: from math import factorial

In [70]: def lexigreaterperms(perm):
    ...:     return factorial(len(perm)) - 1 -  list(permutations(sorted(perm))).index(tuple(perm))

In [71]: lexigreaterperms('bca')
Out[71]: 2

In [72]: lexigreaterperms('dacb')
Out[72]: 4
  • 1
    So what happens if you try lexigreaterperms(range(20))? – Gareth Rees Aug 27 '12 at 20:48
  • @Gareth Rees: What normally happens if you prematurely optimize without measurement of the needs of the task. I am well aware of the complexity of the algorithm. I am not aware of any other needs of the task beyond what was stated. Your comment could be the equivalent of "But what happens if you are walking over lava" for someone asking for sandals to walk on a hot beach. Start simple. Get something that is right and that you can measure. You can always use this to test another more efficient implementation if that becomes necessary. But only then – Paddy3118 Aug 28 '12 at 7:29
  • 3
    The OP used the word "efficient" which I took to mean "not by generating all the permutations, which would take exponential time". But in any case, even if exponential time were acceptable, the call to list ensures that exponential space is needed too. – Gareth Rees Aug 28 '12 at 9:45

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