-1

I wrote the following class:

  public class TestOne {
     public static void main(String[] args) {
        int count = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
          count++;
        }
        System.out.println(count);
     }
   }

The output is 100.

Then I added a semicolon:

    public class TestOne {
     public static void main(String[] args) {
        int count = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++); {     // <-- Added semicolon
          count++;
        }
        System.out.println(count);
     }
   }

The output is 1.

The result is unbelievable. Why does this added semicolon change the meaning of my program so dramatically?

  • According to the Java Language Specification, for expects a block -- in the first case, it is { count++; }, while in the second, it is ;. The block ; is essentially a nop. – oldrinb Aug 28 '12 at 5:09
  • For this reason (and because its less work), I always let the IDE do the code formatting. This avoid adding formatting which is not correct and is more misleading than helpful. – Peter Lawrey Aug 28 '12 at 8:56
7

This is not a bug. The semicolon becomes the only "statement" in the body of your for loop.

Write this another way to make it easier to see:

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    ;

{
    count++;
}

The block with count++ becomes a bare block with a single statement, which isn't associated with the for loop at all, because of the semicolon. So this block, and the count++ within it, is only executed once.

This is syntactically valid java. for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++); is equivalent to:

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{ ; } // no statement in the body of the loop.

for loops of this form can be useful because of the side-effects within the loop increment statement or termination condition. For instance, if you wanted to write your own indexOfSpace to find the first index of a space character in a String:

int idx;

// for loop with no body, just incrementing idx:
for (idx = 0; string.charAt(idx) != ' '; idx++);

// now idx will point to the index of the ' '
8

The semicolon makes the body of the for loop empty. It is equivalent to:

public class TestOne {
     public static void main(String[] args) {
        int count = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) { }

        count++;
        System.out.println(count);
     }
   }
3

By adding that semicolon, you are declaring the for statement without a block to loop.

This causes count++ to only be executed once when it's passed, rather than 100 times when it's looped over.

1

With that semicolon you are saying that the for loop block is ending and there is no instructions inside.

Then you increment count just once and this is why the output is 1

public class TestOne {
     public static void main(String[] args) {
        int count = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)  ; 

        {
          count++;
        }
        System.out.println(count);
     }
   }
  • Please see my classes carefully. – Sai Ye Yan Naing Aye Aug 28 '12 at 4:42
  • 1
    @SaiYeYanNaingAye yes I saw them, the only thing I did it rewrite it to make it clear. It´s the same thing – marc_ferna Aug 28 '12 at 4:44
  • Thanks marc_ferna, Michael Petrotta edited my post.I think it is more convenience than my old post. – Sai Ye Yan Naing Aye Aug 28 '12 at 4:47
1

Semicolon is an empty statement and its a valid statement. Your current loop is acting on just that "empty statement (;) therefore you don't see any change in count with respect to the loop.

After the loop the statement count++ gets executed once and hence you see the result '1'. If the body of the loop is not specified using { } then the first statement of after the loop is considered part of the loop. In your second case its the empty statement.

Its equivalent to:

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) 
      { 
       ; //any empty valid statement
      }

count++;
0

after iteration ending you are incrementing count value

After for loop you are using semi colon so your for loop is end

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++);

{ count++; }

count incremental is not in the for loop. it is outside the loop;

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