43

I am trying to inject a Spring dependency into an JPA EntityListener. Here is my listener class:

@Configurable(autowire = Autowire.BY_TYPE, dependencyCheck = true)
public class PliListener {

    @Autowired
    private EvenementPliRepository evenementPliRepository;

    @PostPersist
    void onPostPersist(Pli pli) {
        EvenementPli ev = new EvenementPli();
        ev.setPli(pli);
        ev.setDateCreation(new Date());
        ev.setType(TypeEvenement.creation);
        ev.setMessage("Création d'un pli");
        System.out.println("evenementPliRepository: " + evenementPliRepository);
        evenementPliRepository.save(ev);
    }


}

Here is my Entity class:

@RooJavaBean
@RooToString
@RooJpaActiveRecord
@EntityListeners(PliListener.class)
public class Pli implements Serializable{
...

However, my dependency (i.e. evenementPliRepository) is always null.

Can anyone please help?

11 Answers 11

30

A hack to inject dependencies on stateless beans, is to define the dependency as "static", create a setter method so that Spring can inject the dependency (assigning it to the static dependency).

Declare the dependency as static.

static private EvenementPliRepository evenementPliRepository;

Create a method so that Spring can inject it.

@Autowired
public void init(EvenementPliRepository evenementPliRepository) 
{
    MyListenerClass.evenementPliRepository = evenementPliRepository;
    logger.info("Initializing with dependency ["+ evenementPliRepository +"]"); 
}

More details at: http://blog-en.lineofsightnet.com/2012/08/dependency-injection-on-stateless-beans.html

  • 3
    The listener class must be annotated with @Component (or similar) for this to work – 1615903 Jul 20 '18 at 8:16
  • 1
    This works fantastically! Thanks!! – Van Dame Feb 22 at 11:21
21

This is actually an old question but I found an alternative solution :

public class MyEntityListener {
    @Autowired
    private ApplicationEventPublisher publisher;

    @PostPersist
    public void postPersist(MyEntity target) {
        SpringBeanAutowiringSupport.processInjectionBasedOnCurrentContext(this);

        publisher.publishEvent(new OnCreatedEvent<>(this, target));
    }

    @PostUpdate
    public void postUpdate(MyEntity target) {
        SpringBeanAutowiringSupport.processInjectionBasedOnCurrentContext(this);

        publisher.publishEvent(new OnUpdatedEvent<>(this, target));
    }

    @PostRemove
    public void postDelete(MyEntity target) {
        SpringBeanAutowiringSupport.processInjectionBasedOnCurrentContext(this);

        publisher.publishEvent(new OnDeletedEvent<>(this, target));
    }
}

Probably not the best one but better than static variables w/o AOP + weaving.

  • And how to attach that listener to actual entity without using xml?? – Antoniossss Jul 7 '17 at 11:59
  • Add @EntityListeners(MyEntityListener.class) on the related entity. – Ludovic Guillaume Jul 10 '17 at 9:59
  • Cannot do - model is in separate JAR. What I meant is to how to do that without XML on runtime. – Antoniossss Jul 10 '17 at 10:11
  • This is already a XML-less solution. You should include this to your jar that contains entities. Or maybe create a shared jar. If you don't have access to model's sources, you probably have to extend each class you want to listen. – Ludovic Guillaume Jul 10 '17 at 10:17
  • 2
    It worked like a charm! Just a bit worried about possible performance issues since as the method name says it process the injections again – Leonardo Beal Nov 16 '17 at 16:15
14

And what about this solution?

@MappedSuperclass
@EntityListeners(AbstractEntityListener.class)
public abstract class AbstractEntity {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    @Column(name = "id")
    private Long id;

    @Column(name = "creation_date")
    private Date creationDate;

    @Column(name = "modification_date")
    private Date modificationDate;

}

Then the Listener...

@Component
public class AbstractEntityListener {

    @Autowired
    private DateTimeService dateTimeService;

    @PreUpdate
    public void preUpdate(AbstractEntity abstractEntity) {
        AutowireHelper.autowire(this, this.dateTimeService);
            abstractEntity.setModificationDate(this.dateTimeService.getCurrentDate());
    }

    @PrePersist
    public void prePersist(AbstractEntity abstractEntity) {
        AutowireHelper.autowire(this, this.dateTimeService);
        Date currentDate = this.dateTimeService.getCurrentDate();
        abstractEntity.setCreationDate(currentDate);
        abstractEntity.setModificationDate(currentDate);
    }
}

And the helper...

    /**
     * Helper class which is able to autowire a specified class. It holds a static reference to the {@link org
     * .springframework.context.ApplicationContext}.
     */
    public final class AutowireHelper implements ApplicationContextAware {

        private static final AutowireHelper INSTANCE = new AutowireHelper();
        private static ApplicationContext applicationContext;

        private AutowireHelper() {
        }

        /**
         * Tries to autowire the specified instance of the class if one of the specified beans which need to be autowired
         * are null.
         *
         * @param classToAutowire the instance of the class which holds @Autowire annotations
         * @param beansToAutowireInClass the beans which have the @Autowire annotation in the specified {#classToAutowire}
         */
        public static void autowire(Object classToAutowire, Object... beansToAutowireInClass) {
            for (Object bean : beansToAutowireInClass) {
                if (bean == null) {
                    applicationContext.getAutowireCapableBeanFactory().autowireBean(classToAutowire);
                }
            }
        }

        @Override
        public void setApplicationContext(final ApplicationContext applicationContext) {
            AutowireHelper.applicationContext = applicationContext;
        }

        /**
         * @return the singleton instance.
         */
        public static AutowireHelper getInstance() {
            return INSTANCE;
        }

    }

Works for me.

Source: http://guylabs.ch/2014/02/22/autowiring-pring-beans-in-hibernate-jpa-entity-listeners/

  • There is a gotcha with this solution if the EntityListener is used in the initialization of ApplicationContext itself; then you must make sure that the AutowireHelper bean is initialized before the code that uses it. – holmis83 Jun 30 '17 at 15:37
  • Works, but only after you register the AutowireHelper in the config xml or Java Spring configuration: @Bean public AutowireHelper autowireHelper(){ return AutowireHelper.getInstance(); } – ashes Jan 17 '18 at 9:14
13

I started to go down the path of using AOP to inject a spring bean into an Entity listener. After a day and a half of research and trying different things I came across this link which stated:

It is not possible to inject spring managed beans into a JPA EntityListener class. This is because the JPA listener mechanism should be based on a stateless class, so the methods are effectively static, and non-context aware. ... No amount of AOP will save you, nothing gets injected to the ‘object’ representing the listener, because the implementations don’t actually create instances, but uses the class method.

At this point I regrouped and stumbled across the EclipseLink DescriptorEventAdapter. Using this information I created a listener class that extended the Descriptor Adapter.

public class EntityListener extends DescriptorEventAdapter {
    private String injectedValue;

    public void setInjectedValue(String value){
        this.injectedValue = value;
    }

    @Override
    public void aboutToInsert(DescriptorEvent event) {
       // Do what you need here
    }
}

In order to use the class I could have used the @EntityListeners annotation on my entity class. Unfortunately, this method would not allow Spring to control the creation of my listener and as a result would not allow for dependency injection. Instead I added the following 'init' function to my class:

public void init() {
    JpaEntityManager entityManager = null;

    try {
        // Create an entity manager for use in this function
        entityManager = (JpaEntityManager) entityManagerFactory.createEntityManager();
        // Use the entity manager to get a ClassDescriptor for the Entity class
        ClassDescriptor desc = 
            entityManager.getSession().getClassDescriptor(<EntityClass>.class);
        // Add this class as a listener to the class descriptor
        desc.getEventManager().addListener(this);
    } finally {
        if (entityManager != null) {
            // Cleanup the entity manager
            entityManager.close();
        }
    }
}

Add a little Spring XML configuration

<!-- Define listener object -->
<bean id="entityListener" class="EntityListener " init-method="init">
    <property name="injectedValue" value="Hello World"/>
    <property name="entityManagerFactory" ref="emf"/>
</bean>  

Now we have a situation where Spring creates a entity listener, injects it with whatever dependencies are needed, and the listener object registers itself with the entity class to which it intends to listen.

I hope this helps.

9

I annotated the listener with @Component annotation, then created a non static setter to assign the injected Spring bean, it works well

My code looks like :

@Component
public class EntityListener {

    private static MyService service;

    @Autowired
    public void setMyService (MyService service) {
        this.service=service;
    }


    @PreUpdate
    public void onPreUpdate() {

        service.doThings()

    }

    @PrePersist
    public void onPersist() {
       ...
    }


}
  • 2
    maybe EntityListener.service=service would be better than this.service=service – othmane Jan 2 at 13:03
6

I tested out the approach suggested in https://guylabs.ch/2014/02/22/autowiring-pring-beans-in-hibernate-jpa-entity-listeners/ and worked. Not very clean but does the job. Slightly modified AutowireHelper class for me looked like this:

import org.springframework.context.ApplicationContext;
import org.springframework.context.ApplicationContextAware;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;

@Component
public class AutowireHelper implements ApplicationContextAware {

    private static ApplicationContext applicationContext;

    private AutowireHelper() {
    }

    public static void autowire(Object classToAutowire) {
        AutowireHelper.applicationContext.getAutowireCapableBeanFactory().autowireBean(classToAutowire);
    }

    @Override
    public void setApplicationContext(final ApplicationContext applicationContext) {
        AutowireHelper.applicationContext = applicationContext;
    }
}

Then called this from entity listener like this:

public class MyEntityAccessListener {

    @Autowired
    private MyService myService;


    @PostLoad
    public void postLoad(Object target) {

        AutowireHelper.autowire(this);

        myService.doThings();
        ...
    }

    public void setMyService(MyService myService) {
        this.myService = myService;
    }
}
2

I believe it is because this listener bean is not under control of Spring. Spring is not instantiating it, how can Spring know how to find that bean and do the injection?

I haven't tried on that, but seems that you can make use of AspectJ Weaver with Spring's Configurable annotation to have Spring control non-Spring-instantiated beans.

http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.1.2.RELEASE/spring-framework-reference/html/aop.html#aop-using-aspectj

  • Hello and thank you Adrian. I have added <context:spring-configured/> to my configuration. I have aop*.jars in my POM. I don't think I am missing anything. Still evenementPliRepository is null. Any other idea of what I could be missing?? – balteo Aug 28 '12 at 9:39
  • Do you have the agent started? quoted from the ref: Further, in certain environments, this support enables load-time weaving without making any modifications to the application server's launch script that will be needed to add -javaagent:path/to/aspectjweaver.jar or (as we describe later in this section) -javaagent:path/to/org.springframework.instrument-{version}.jar (previously named spring-agent.jar). But to be honest, I haven't really tried this feature before, probably there is other restrictions on this which I am not aware – Adrian Shum Aug 28 '12 at 9:44
  • I am going to check that. I am also realizing that because I use Spring Roo, @Configurable is already set up by Roo. What also strikes me is that I get no warning about dependency issues... – balteo Aug 28 '12 at 9:58
  • You can never get error on that, because, as I said, that object instance is not managed by Spring. Having those DI-related annotations means nothing. No one is going to look at those annotations to do anything. – Adrian Shum Aug 29 '12 at 1:30
1

Another option:

Create a service to make AplicationContext accessible:

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.context.ApplicationContext;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Service;

import lombok.Setter;

@Service
class ContextWrapper {

    @Setter
    private static ApplicationContext context;

    @Autowired
    public ContextWrapper(ApplicationContext ac) {
        setContext(ac);
    }

    public static ApplicationContext getContext() {
        return context;
    }

}

Use it:

...    
public class AuditListener {

    private static final String AUDIT_REPOSITORY = "AuditRepository";

    @PrePersist
    public void beforePersist(Object object){
        //TODO:
    }

    @PreUpdate
    public void beforeUpdate(Object object){
        //TODO:
    }

    @PreRemove
    public void beforeDelete(Object object) {
        getRepo().save(getAuditElement("DEL",object));
    }

    private Audit getAuditElement(String Operation,Object object){

        Audit audit = new Audit();
        audit.setActor("test");
        Timestamp timestamp = new Timestamp(System.currentTimeMillis());
        audit.setDate(timestamp);

        return audit;
    }

    private AuditRepository getRepo(){
        return ContextWrapper.getContext().getBean(AUDIT_REPOSITORY, AuditRepository.class);
    }
}

This class is created as a listener from jpa:

...
@Entity
@EntityListeners(AuditListener.class)
@NamedQuery(name="Customer.findAll", query="SELECT c FROM Customer c")
public class Customer implements Serializable {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
...

Since the listener is not under Spring's control, it can not access the context bean. I have tried multiple options (@Configurable (...)) and none has worked except to create a class that static access to the context. Already in that dilemma I think that this is an elegant option.

1

The problem with JPA Listeners is that:

  1. they are not managed by Spring (so no injections)

  2. they are (or might be) created before Spring's Application Context is ready (so we can't inject beans on a constructor call)

My workaround to deal with the issue:

1) Create Listener class with public static LISTENERS field:

public abstract class Listener {
    // for encapsulation purposes we have private modifiable and public non-modifiable lists
    private static final List<Listener> PRIVATE_LISTENERS = new ArrayList<>();
    public static final List<Listener> LISTENERS = Collections.unmodifiableList(PRIVATE_LISTENERS);

    protected Listener() {
        PRIVATE_LISTENERS.add(this);
    }
}

2) All JPA listeners that we want to be added to Listener.LISTENERS has to extend this class:

public class MyListener extends Listener {

    @PrePersist
    public void onPersist() {
        ...
    }

    ...
}

3) Now we can get all listeners and inject beans just after Spring's Application Context is ready

@Component
public class ListenerInjector {

    @Autowired
    private ApplicationContext context;

    @EventListener(ContextRefreshedEvent.class)
    public void contextRefreshed() {
       Listener.LISTENERS.forEach(listener -> context.getAutowireCapableBeanFactory().autowireBean(listener));
    }

}
  • Thaaank you. Super helpful. – Jmrapp Jun 27 at 19:40
0

Since Spring V5.1 (and Hibernate V5.3) it should work out of the box as Spring registers as the provider of those classes. see documentation of SpringBeanContainer

0

I have used another way. I was using Spring MVC I created a singleton class called AppContextAware

public class AppContextAware{

private static AppContextAware appContextAware;
private ApplicationContext applicationContext;
private AppContextAware() {
}

public static AppContextAware getInstance() {
    if(null == appContextAware) {
        appContextAware = new AppContextAware();
    }
    return appContextAware;
}

public ApplicationContext getApplicationContext() {
    return applicationContext;
}

public void setApplicationContext(ApplicationContext applicationContext) {
    this.applicationContext = applicationContext;
}}

Then I waited for the context refreshed event by registering an event listener

@Bean
public ApplicationListener<ContextRefreshedEvent> applicationListener() {
    final AppContextAware appContextAware = AppContextAware.getInstance();
    return new ApplicationListener<ContextRefreshedEvent>() {
        public void onApplicationEvent(ContextRefreshedEvent event) {
            appContextAware.setApplicationContext(event.getApplicationContext());
        }
    };
}

Now from the AppContextAware, I get the context wherever I want with whatever class

AppContextAware.getInstance().getApplicationContext().getBean(xyz.class)

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