199

Is there some way that I can run the following:

var data = $("#dataTable").data('timer');
var diffs = [];

for(var i = 0; i + 1 < data.length; i++) {
    diffs[i] = data[i + 1] - data[i];
}

alert(diffs.join(', '));

Only if there is an attribute called data-timer on the element with an id of #dataTable?

1
  • One caveat to be aware of is that sometimes there won't be anything stored in a data- attribute but there will be data stored in jQuery and vice versa. – Alex W Jun 21 '16 at 19:33

15 Answers 15

324
if ($("#dataTable").data('timer')) {
  ...
}

NOTE this only returns true if the data attribute is not empty string or a "falsey" value e.g. 0 or false.

If you want to check for the existence of the data attribute, even if empty, do this:

if (typeof $("#dataTable").data('timer') !== 'undefined') {
  ...
}
16
  • 37
    Another option for you: if ($("#dataTable[data-timer]").length) { ... }. – VisioN Aug 28 '12 at 14:15
  • 103
    Be careful! This only evaluates to true if data-timer has a value. If it's present, but empty it will return false. – Kong Jun 17 '13 at 2:43
  • 15
    Kong is right, if there is an empty value your code doesnt work. Use this instead : if (typeof $("#dataTable").attr('data-timer') !== "undefined") { ... } – PierrickM Aug 8 '13 at 15:45
  • 22
    Yet another version that gives you an actual boolean for your conditional: if ( $("#dataTable").is("[data-timer]") ) { ... }. It's also more useful if you already have a reference to the table in another jQuery object. – Noyo Dec 10 '13 at 11:01
  • 10
    It will return false if the value exists and is equal to 0. This is quirky. – Gherman Apr 7 '15 at 6:42
115
if (typeof $("#dataTable").data('timer') !== 'undefined')
{
    // your code here
}
6
  • @VisioN A fail-safe combination of your and PierrickM's comment on this answer: if (typeof $('#dataTable').data('timer') !== 'undefined') .... – WynandB Nov 20 '13 at 0:07
  • 3
    @Wynand. Updated to reflect yours and VisioN's comment. – Paul Fleming Nov 20 '13 at 14:43
  • 1
    @flem You also need to add in the typeof check – Brendan Bullen Nov 20 '13 at 14:46
  • 1
    @flem, @VisioN, your approaches fail in the case where there is no data attribute, but data has still been set with the .data() method, e.g. $('#dataTable').data('timer', Date.now()). It seems the OP wants to check that the actual data attribute is there. @niiru's solution (or the one you offer in a comment to that solution) is better, in this case. – Noyo Dec 10 '13 at 10:54
  • 1
    @VisioN For me it's about checking for undefined in a consistent manner. We know why typeof is used to check for undefined in some cases, but I'd find it confusing to see it being checked with typeof in one place and without in another. Besides, it's not like using typeof adds a lot more complicated code. It may be more explicit, perhaps redundant at most but hardly overcomplicated. I see your point though, but I'd say that not using it would be oversimplification. ;] – WynandB Sep 30 '14 at 12:05
38

In the interest of providing a different answer from the ones above; you could check it with Object.hasOwnProperty(...) like this:

 if( $("#dataTable").data().hasOwnProperty("timer") ){
     // the data-time property exists, now do you business! .....
 }

alternatively, if you have multiple data elements you want to iterate over you can variablize the .data() object and iterate over it like this:

 var objData = $("#dataTable").data();
 for ( data in objData ){
      if( data == 'timer' ){
            //...do the do
      }
 }

Not saying this solution is better than any of the other ones in here, but at least it's another approach...

2
  • 9
    This is interesting, but it should be noted that if you have the attribute data-foo-bar then your check needs to be .data().hasOwnProperty("fooBar"), not .data().hasOwnProperty("foo-bar") – dgmstuart Sep 26 '15 at 1:03
  • Interesting in this instance with the javascript validator. The typeof returned undefined, but this worked! – Richard Housham Aug 15 '16 at 13:43
13

Or combine with some vanilla JS

if ($("#dataTable").get(0).hasAttribute("data-timer")) {
  ...
}
1
  • I like this one. However, you create the data using jQuery using data() instead of attr(), it will not find the attribute :( – Sam Jul 2 '20 at 11:55
11

You can use jQuery's hasData method.

http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.hasData/

The primary advantage of jQuery.hasData(element) is that it does not create and associate a data object with the element if none currently exists. In contrast, jQuery.data(element) always returns a data object to the caller, creating one if no data object previously existed.

This will only check for the existence of any data objects (or events) on your element, it won't be able to confirm if it specifically has a "timer" object.

0
11

If you want to distinguish between empty values and missing values you can use jQuery to check like this.

<div id="element" data-foo="bar" data-empty=""></div>

<script>
"foo" in $('#element').data(); // true
"empty" in $('#element').data(); // true
"other" in $('#element').data(); // false
</script>

So from the original question you'd do this.

if("timer" in $("#dataTable").data()) {
  // code
}
8

You can create an extremely simple jQuery-plugin to query an element for this:

$.fn.hasData = function(key) {
  return (typeof $(this).data(key) != 'undefined');
};

Then you can simply use $("#dataTable").hasData('timer')

Gotchas:

  • Will return false only if the value does not exist (is undefined); if it's set to false/null it hasData() will still return true.
  • It's different from the built-in $.hasData() which only checks if any data on the element is set.
0
7

All the answers here use the jQuery library.

But the vanilla javascript is very straightforward.

If you want to run a script only if the element with an id of #dataTable also has a data-timer attribute, then the steps are as follows:

// Locate the element
const myElement = document.getElementById('dataTable');

// Run conditional code
if (myElement.dataset.hasOwnProperty('timer')) {

  [... CODE HERE...]

}
3

I've found this works better with dynamically set data elements:

if ($("#myelement").data('myfield')) {
  ...
}
0
3

This is the easiest solution in my opinion is to select all the element which has certain data attribute:

var data = $("#dataTable[data-timer]");
var diffs = [];

for(var i = 0; i + 1 < data.length; i++) {
    diffs[i] = data[i + 1] - data[i];
}

alert(diffs.join(', '));

Here is the screenshot of how it works.

console log of the jquery selector

1

Wrong answer - see EDIT at the end

Let me build on Alex's answer.

To prevent the creation of a data object if it doesn't exists, I would better do:

$.fn.hasData = function(key) {
    var $this = $(this);
    return $.hasData($this) && typeof $this.data(key) !== 'undefined';
};

Then, where $this has no data object created, $.hasData returns false and it will not execute $this.data(key).

EDIT: function $.hasData(element) works only if the data was set using $.data(element, key, value), not element.data(key, value). Due to that, my answer is not correct.

1

I needed a simple boolean to work with. Because it's undefined of not present, and not false, I use the !! to convert to boolean:

var hasTimer = !!$("#dataTable").data('timer');
if( hasTimer ){ /* ....... */ }

An alternative solution would be using filter:

if( $("#dataTable").filter('[data-timer]').length!==0) { /* ....... */ }
0
0
var data = $("#dataTable").data('timer');
var diffs = [];

if( data.length > 0 ) {
for(var i = 0; i + 1 < data.length; i++) {
    diffs[i] = data[i + 1] - data[i];
}

alert(diffs.join(', '));
}
2
  • If .data('timer') is undefined you'll get a TypeError: $(...).data(...) is undefined when checking data.length. This is most likely the basis of the OP's question, i.e. making sure that one can safely check data.length elsewhere. Besides, you wouldn't necessarily be able to say for sure whether data is a string, an array or an object, of which the latter may or may not contain length as a defined property. – WynandB Nov 20 '13 at 0:37
  • Yes my answer needs revision. Written in 2012.. But rewriting it would be useless as the answer is already given. – Luceos Nov 20 '13 at 7:38
0

You can check by css attribute selection with

if ($('#dataTable').is('[data-timer]')) {
   // data-timer attribute exists
}
1
  • 3
    Data values are not always stored as DOM attributes. When you modify data values with jQuery using $.data, it sets it as a element property. – qwerty Apr 15 '14 at 10:04
0

And what about:

if ($('#dataTable[data-timer]').length > 0) {
    // logic here
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.